This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Catch the case of filesize limits.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Sat, 14 Aug 1999 11:31:58 +0000 (11:31 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Sat, 14 Aug 1999 11:31:58 +0000 (11:31 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/cfgperl@3989

t/lib/syslfs.t
t/op/lfs.t

index 458b626..084ec31 100644 (file)
@@ -26,6 +26,20 @@ sub bye {
     exit(0);
 }
 
+sub explain {
+    print STDERR <<EOM;
+#
+# If the lfs (large file support: large meaning larger than two gigabytes)
+# tests fail, it may mean either that your process is not allowed to write
+# large files or that the file system you are running the tests on doesn't
+# support large files, or both.
+#
+# Perl may still be able to support large files, once you have
+# such a process and such a file system.
+#
+EOM
+}
+
 # Known have-nots.
 if ($^O eq 'win32' || $^O eq 'vms') {
     print "1..0\n# no sparse files\n";
@@ -64,14 +78,18 @@ unless (@s == 13 &&
 # By now we better be sure that we do have sparse files:
 # if we are not, the following will hog 5 gigabytes of disk.  Ooops.
 
-print "1..8\n";
-
-my $fail = 0;
-
 sysopen(BIG, "big", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC) or
        do { warn "sysopen failed: $!\n"; bye };
 sysseek(BIG, 5_000_000_000, SEEK_SET);
-syswrite(BIG, "big");
+# The syswrite will fail if there are are filesize limitations (process or fs).
+unless(syswrite(BIG, "big") == 3) {
+    $ENV{LC_ALL} = "C";
+    if ($! =~/File too large/) {
+       print "1..0\n# writing past 2GB failed\n";
+       explain();
+       bye();
+    }
+}
 close BIG;
 
 @s = stat("big");
@@ -83,6 +101,10 @@ sub fail () {
     $fail++;
 }
 
+print "1..8\n";
+
+my $fail = 0;
+
 fail unless $s[7] == 5_000_000_003;    # exercizes pp_stat
 print "ok 1\n";
 
@@ -119,16 +141,7 @@ print "ok 7\n";
 fail unless $big eq "big";
 print "ok 8\n";
 
-if ($fail) {
-    print STDERR <<EOM;
-#
-# If the lfs (large file support) tests fail, it may mean that
-# the *file system* you are running the tests on doesn't support
-# large files (files larger than two gigabytes).  Perl may still
-# be able to support such files, once you have such a file system.
-#
-EOM
-}
+explain if $fail;
 
 bye();
 
index 2683a69..96180a1 100644 (file)
@@ -25,6 +25,20 @@ sub bye {
     exit(0);
 }
 
+sub explain {
+    print STDERR <<EOM;
+#
+# If the lfs (large file support: large meaning larger than two gigabytes)
+# tests fail, it may mean either that your process is not allowed to write
+# large files or that the file system you are running the tests on doesn't
+# support large files, or both.
+#
+# Perl may still be able to support large files, once you have
+# such a process and such a file system.
+#
+EOM
+}
+
 # Known have-nots.
 if ($^O eq 'win32' || $^O eq 'vms') {
     print "1..0\n# no sparse files\n";
@@ -67,15 +81,21 @@ unless (@s == 13 &&
 # By now we better be sure that we do have sparse files:
 # if we are not, the following will hog 5 gigabytes of disk.  Ooops.
 
-print "1..8\n";
-
-my $fail = 0;
-
 open(BIG, ">big") or do { warn "open failed: $!\n"; bye };
 binmode BIG;
 seek(BIG, 5_000_000_000, $SEEK_SET);
-print BIG "big";
-close BIG;
+# Either the print or (more likely, thanks to buffering) the close will
+# fail if there are are filesize limitations (process or fs).
+my $print = print BIG "big";
+my $close = close BIG if $print;
+unless ($print && $close) {
+    $ENV{LC_ALL} = "C";
+    if ($! =~/File too large/) {
+       print "1..0\n# writing past 2GB failed\n";
+       explain();
+    }
+    bye();
+}
 
 @s = stat("big");
 
@@ -86,6 +106,10 @@ sub fail () {
     $fail++;
 }
 
+print "1..8\n";
+
+my $fail = 0;
+
 fail unless $s[7] == 5_000_000_003;    # exercizes pp_stat
 print "ok 1\n";
 
@@ -123,16 +147,7 @@ print "ok 7\n";
 fail unless $big eq "big";
 print "ok 8\n";
 
-if ($fail) {
-    print STDERR <<EOM;
-#
-# If the lfs (large file support) tests fail, it may mean that
-# the *file system* you are running the tests on doesn't support
-# large files (files larger than two gigabytes).  Perl may still
-# be able to support such files, once you have such a file system.
-#
-EOM
-}
+explain if $fail;
 
 bye();