This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
PATCH: perlmodlib.pod
authorArtur Bergman <sky@nanisky.com>
Fri, 25 Dec 1998 00:48:39 +0000 (00:48 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Mon, 28 Dec 1998 07:56:59 +0000 (07:56 +0000)
To: perlbug@perl.com
Message-ID: <3682E0E7.EBFB5D65@vogon-solutions.com>

p4raw-id: //depot/cfgperl@2506

pod/perlmodlib.pod
pod/perlop.pod

index 5d0e5b0..f10d04b 100644 (file)
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ bulletproof.
 
 They work somewhat like pragmas in that they tend to affect the compilation of
 your program, and thus will usually work well only when used within a
-C<use>, or C<no>.  Most of these are locally scoped, so an inner BLOCK
+C<use>, or C<no>.  Most of these are lexically scoped, so an inner BLOCK
 may countermand any of these by saying:
 
     no integer;
index 5a85e7f..a485781 100644 (file)
@@ -620,9 +620,9 @@ the same character fore and aft, but the 4 sorts of brackets
        ""      qq{}          Literal             yes
        ``      qx{}          Command             yes (unless '' is delimiter)
                qw{}         Word list            no
-       //       m{}       Pattern match          yes
-               qr{}          Pattern             yes
-                s{}{}      Substitution          yes
+       //       m{}       Pattern match          yes (unless '' is delimiter)
+               qr{}          Pattern             yes (unless '' is delimiter)
+                s{}{}      Substitution          yes (unless '' is delimiter)
                tr{}{}    Transliteration         no (but see below)
 
 Note that there can be whitespace between the operator and the quoting
@@ -753,22 +753,22 @@ Options are:
 
 If "/" is the delimiter then the initial C<m> is optional.  With the C<m>
 you can use any pair of non-alphanumeric, non-whitespace characters 
-as delimiters (if single quotes are used, no interpretation is done
-on the replacement string. Unlike Perl 4, Perl 5 treats backticks as normal
-delimiters; the replacement text is not evaluated as a command).
-This is particularly useful for matching Unix path names
-that contain "/", to avoid LTS (leaning toothpick syndrome).  If "?" is
+as delimiters. This is particularly useful for matching Unix path names
+that contain "/", to avoid LTS (leaning toothpick syndrome). If "?" is
 the delimiter, then the match-only-once rule of C<?PATTERN?> applies.
+If "'" is the delimiter, no variable interpolation is performed on the
+PATTERN.
 
 PATTERN may contain variables, which will be interpolated (and the
-pattern recompiled) every time the pattern search is evaluated.  (Note
-that C<$)> and C<$|> might not be interpolated because they look like
-end-of-string tests.)  If you want such a pattern to be compiled only
-once, add a C</o> after the trailing delimiter.  This avoids expensive
-run-time recompilations, and is useful when the value you are
-interpolating won't change over the life of the script.  However, mentioning
-C</o> constitutes a promise that you won't change the variables in the pattern.
-If you change them, Perl won't even notice.
+pattern recompiled) every time the pattern search is evaluated, except
+for when the delimiter is a single quote.  (Note that C<$)> and C<$|>
+might not be interpolated because they look like end-of-string tests.)
+If you want such a pattern to be compiled only once, add a C</o> after
+the trailing delimiter.  This avoids expensive run-time recompilations,
+and is useful when the value you are interpolating won't change over
+the life of the script.  However, mentioning C</o> constitutes a promise
+that you won't change the variables in the pattern.  If you change them,
+Perl won't even notice.
 
 If the PATTERN evaluates to the empty string, the last
 I<successfully> matched regular expression is used instead.
@@ -911,8 +911,9 @@ A double-quoted, interpolated string.
 =item qr/STRING/imosx
 
 Quote-as-a-regular-expression operator.  I<STRING> is interpolated the
-same way as I<PATTERN> in C<m/PATTERN/>.  Returns a Perl value which
-may be used instead of the corresponding C</STRING/imosx> expression.
+same way as I<PATTERN> in C<m/PATTERN/>.  If "'" is used as the
+delimiter, no variable interpolation is done.  Returns a Perl value
+which may be used instead of the corresponding C</STRING/imosx> expression.
 
 For example,
 
@@ -1072,7 +1073,7 @@ variable is searched and modified.  (The string specified with C<=~> must
 be scalar variable, an array element, a hash element, or an assignment
 to one of those, i.e., an lvalue.)
 
-If the delimiter chosen is single quote, no variable interpolation is
+If the delimiter chosen is single quote, no variable interpolation is
 done on either the PATTERN or the REPLACEMENT.  Otherwise, if the
 PATTERN contains a $ that looks like a variable rather than an
 end-of-string test, the variable will be interpolated into the pattern