This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Remove proposed (but unimplemented) $foo ~~ Range smart matching.
authorRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Tue, 12 May 2009 07:38:29 +0000 (09:38 +0200)
committerRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Tue, 12 May 2009 07:38:29 +0000 (09:38 +0200)
The reasons for that are :

- $_ ~~ 1..42 actually parses as ($_ ~~ 1) .. 42
- in when(), a range 1..42 will be expanded, and not treated as a
  boolean flip-flop operator
- It will not distribute properly with array smart-matching, as
  in $foo ~~ [1, 2, [4..5]] (that won't match for $foo = 4.2 for
  example.)

op.c
pod/perlsyn.pod
t/op/smartmatch.t
t/op/switch.t

diff --git a/op.c b/op.c
index f1faf42..93bbf21 100644 (file)
--- a/op.c
+++ b/op.c
@@ -5224,6 +5224,8 @@ S_looks_like_bool(pTHX_ const OP *o)
        case OP_DEFINED: case OP_EXISTS:
        case OP_MATCH:   case OP_EOF:
 
+       case OP_FLOP:
+
            return TRUE;
        
        case OP_CONST:
@@ -5234,11 +5236,6 @@ S_looks_like_bool(pTHX_ const OP *o)
                return TRUE;
            else
                return FALSE;
-               
-       case OP_FLOP:
-           /* Detect "..." flip-flop operator */
-           if (cUNOPo->op_first->op_flags & OPf_SPECIAL)
-               return TRUE;
 
        /* FALL THROUGH */
        default:
index 038bcfa..94a5677 100644 (file)
@@ -603,8 +603,7 @@ that return numerical values, not boolean ones.
 
 =item *
 
-the C<...> flip-flop operator (but B<not> the two-dot version C<..>, which
-is used to construct and test against numerical or string ranges).
+the C<..> and C<...> flip-flop operators.
 
 =back
 
@@ -718,11 +717,8 @@ and "Array" entries apply in those cases. (For blessed references, the
     Array   Regex     array grep               grep /$b/, @$a
     Any     Regex     pattern match            $a =~ /$b/
 
-    undef   Range[4]  always false
-    Any     Range[4]  in range
-
     Any     Num       numeric equality         $a == $b
-    Num     numish[5] numeric equality         $a == $b
+    Num     numish[4] numeric equality         $a == $b
     Any     Any       string equality          $a eq $b
 
 
@@ -730,11 +726,7 @@ and "Array" entries apply in those cases. (For blessed references, the
  2 - that is, each element smart-matches the element of same index in the
      other array. [3]
  3 - If a circular reference is found, we fall back to referential equality.
- 4 - a range is written EXPR..EXPR (using the C<..> range operator, but
-     NOT the three-dot version C<...>, which will be treated as a boolean
-     operator). Numeric ranges will use numeric comparison: that is,
-     "4.5 ~~ 3..5" will be true.
- 5 - either a real number, or a string that looks like a number
+ 4 - either a real number, or a string that looks like a number
 
 The "matching code" doesn't represent the I<real> matching code,
 of course: it's just there to explain the intended meaning. Unlike
index eb14bf0..ab36cbf 100644 (file)
@@ -379,8 +379,6 @@ __DATA__
        12345           qr/3/
 !      12345           qr/7/
 
-# TODO ranges
-
 # array/hash against string
        @fooormore      "".\@fooormore
 !      @keyandmore     "".\@fooormore
index 9ca4f13..79b3797 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ BEGIN {
 use strict;
 use warnings;
 
-use Test::More tests => 118;
+use Test::More tests => 122;
 
 # The behaviour of the feature pragma should be tested by lib/switch.t
 # using the tests in t/lib/switch/*. This file tests the behaviour of
@@ -517,6 +517,17 @@ sub notfoo {"bar"}
     my $n = 0;
     for my $l qw(a b c d) {
        given ($l) {
+           when ($_ eq "b" .. $_ eq "c") { $n = 1 }
+           default { $n = 0 }
+       }
+       ok(($n xor $l =~ /[ad]/), 'when(E1..E2) evaluates in boolean context');
+    }
+}
+
+{
+    my $n = 0;
+    for my $l qw(a b c d) {
+       given ($l) {
            when ($_ eq "b" ... $_ eq "c") { $n = 1 }
            default { $n = 0 }
        }