This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Change some link pod for better rendering
authorKarl Williamson <khw@cpan.org>
Sun, 16 Aug 2020 01:59:43 +0000 (19:59 -0600)
committerKarl Williamson <khw@cpan.org>
Tue, 1 Sep 2020 00:15:43 +0000 (18:15 -0600)
C<L</foo>> renders better in places than L</C<foo>>

README.os2
hv.c
lib/overload.pm
pod/perl5120delta.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlrebackslash.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
utf8.c
utf8.h

index 0b1ad92..8389bd7 100644 (file)
@@ -300,7 +300,7 @@ with
        perl ../../blah/foo.cmd arg1 arg2 arg3
 
 (note that the argument C<-my_opts> is taken care of by the C<extproc> line
-in your script, see L</C<extproc> on the first line>).
+in your script, see C<L</extproc> on the first line>).
 
 To understand what the above I<magic> does, read perl docs about C<-S>
 switch - see L<perlrun>, and cmdref about C<extproc>:
@@ -558,7 +558,7 @@ of this file.
 
 B<NOTE>. Because of a typo the binary installer of 5.00305
 would install a variable C<PERL_SHPATH> into F<Config.sys>. Please
-remove this variable and put L</C<PERL_SH_DIR>> instead.
+remove this variable and put C<L</PERL_SH_DIR>> instead.
 
 =head2 Manual binary installation
 
diff --git a/hv.c b/hv.c
index 3aa1d42..e44e75e 100644 (file)
--- a/hv.c
+++ b/hv.c
@@ -3737,10 +3737,10 @@ Returns the label attached to a cop, and stores its length in bytes into
 C<*len>.
 Upon return, C<*flags> will be set to either C<SVf_UTF8> or 0.
 
-Alternatively, use the macro L</C<CopLABEL_len_flags>>;
+Alternatively, use the macro C<L</CopLABEL_len_flags>>;
 or if you don't need to know if the label is UTF-8 or not, the macro
-L</C<CopLABEL_len>>;
-or if you additionally dont need to know the length, L</C<CopLABEL>>.
+C<L</CopLABEL_len>>;
+or if you additionally dont need to know the length, C<L</CopLABEL>>.
 
 =cut
 */
index 30f810b..c8b46f4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 package overload;
 
-our $VERSION = '1.31';
+our $VERSION = '1.32';
 
 %ops = (
     with_assign         => "+ - * / % ** << >> x .",
@@ -1239,7 +1239,7 @@ Put this in F<symbolic.pm> in your Perl library directory:
 
 This module is very unusual as overloaded modules go: it does not
 provide any usual overloaded operators, instead it provides an
-implementation for L</C<nomethod>>.  In this example the C<nomethod>
+implementation for C<L</nomethod>>.  In this example the C<nomethod>
 subroutine returns an object which encapsulates operations done over
 the objects: C<< symbolic->new(3) >> contains C<['n', 3]>, C<< 2 +
 symbolic->new(3) >> contains C<['+', 2, ['n', 3]]>.
index 5b5eac0..2bfddc2 100644 (file)
@@ -573,7 +573,7 @@ could create names that are, for example, made up entirely of punctuation
 symbols. It is now deprecated to make names that don't begin with an
 alphabetic character, and aren't alphanumeric or contain other than
 a very few other characters, namely spaces, dashes, parentheses
-and colons. Because of the added meaning of C<\N> (See L</C<\N>
+and colons. Because of the added meaning of C<\N> (See C<L</\N>
 experimental regex escape>), names that look like curly brace -enclosed
 quantifiers won't work. For example, C<\N{3,4}> now means to match 3 to
 4 non-newlines; before a custom name C<3,4> could have been created.
index f49fd35..bc475ec 100644 (file)
@@ -296,7 +296,7 @@ string as a multi-line buffer, such that the C<"^"> will match after any
 newline within the string (except if the newline is the last character in
 the string), and C<"$"> will match before any newline.  At the
 cost of a little more overhead, you can do this by using the
-L</C<E<sol>m>> modifier on the pattern match operator.  (Older programs
+C<L</E<sol>m>> modifier on the pattern match operator.  (Older programs
 did this by setting C<$*>, but this option was removed in perl 5.10.)
 X<^> X<$> X</m>
 
@@ -710,7 +710,7 @@ the pattern uses a Unicode break (C<\b{...}> or C<\B{...}>); or
 
 =item 7
 
-the pattern uses L</C<(?[ ])>>
+the pattern uses C<L</(?[ ])>>
 
 =item 8
 
@@ -926,7 +926,7 @@ string" problem can be most efficiently performed when written as:
 
 as we know that if the final quote does not match, backtracking will not
 help. See the independent subexpression
-L</C<< (?>I<pattern>) >>> for more details;
+C<L</(?E<gt>I<pattern>)>> for more details;
 possessive quantifiers are just syntactic sugar for that construct. For
 instance the above example could also be written as follows:
 
@@ -2575,7 +2575,7 @@ you can write either of these:
  (*atomic_script_run:pattern)
  (*asr:pattern)
 
-(See L</C<(?E<gt>I<pattern>)>>.)
+(See C<L</(?E<gt>I<pattern>)>>.)
 
 In Taiwan, Japan, and Korea, it is common for text to have a mixture of
 characters from their native scripts and base Chinese.  Perl follows
index 1a812a8..94fb99d 100644 (file)
@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ The boundary types are:
 
 This matches a Unicode "Grapheme Cluster Boundary".  (Actually Perl
 always uses the improved "extended" grapheme cluster").  These are
-explained below under L</C<\X>>.  In fact, C<\X> is another way to get
+explained below under C<L</\X>>.  In fact, C<\X> is another way to get
 the same functionality.  It is equivalent to C</.+?\b{gcb}/>.  Use
 whichever is most convenient for your situation.
 
index acfc64c..5d3aa3e 100644 (file)
@@ -957,7 +957,7 @@ X<-X>
 Disables all warnings regardless of C<use warnings> or C<$^W>.
 See L<warnings>.
 
-Forbidden in L</C<PERL5OPT>>.
+Forbidden in C<L</PERL5OPT>>.
 
 =item B<-x>
 X<-x>
diff --git a/utf8.c b/utf8.c
index 88233e8..d0b9596 100644 (file)
--- a/utf8.c
+++ b/utf8.c
@@ -493,7 +493,7 @@ different extension.  For these reasons, there is a separate set of flags that
 can warn and/or disallow these extremely high code points, even if other
 above-Unicode ones are accepted.  They are the C<UNICODE_WARN_PERL_EXTENDED>
 and C<UNICODE_DISALLOW_PERL_EXTENDED> flags.  For more information see
-L</C<UTF8_GOT_PERL_EXTENDED>>.  Of course C<UNICODE_DISALLOW_SUPER> will
+C<L</UTF8_GOT_PERL_EXTENDED>>.  Of course C<UNICODE_DISALLOW_SUPER> will
 treat all above-Unicode code points, including these, as malformations.  (Note
 that the Unicode standard considers anything above 0x10FFFF to be illegal, but
 there are standards predating it that allow up to 0x7FFF_FFFF (2**31 -1))
@@ -1260,7 +1260,7 @@ different extension.  For these reasons, there is a separate set of flags that
 can warn and/or disallow these extremely high code points, even if other
 above-Unicode ones are accepted.  They are the C<UTF8_WARN_PERL_EXTENDED> and
 C<UTF8_DISALLOW_PERL_EXTENDED> flags.  For more information see
-L</C<UTF8_GOT_PERL_EXTENDED>>.  Of course C<UTF8_DISALLOW_SUPER> will treat all
+C<L</UTF8_GOT_PERL_EXTENDED>>.  Of course C<UTF8_DISALLOW_SUPER> will treat all
 above-Unicode code points, including these, as malformations.
 (Note that the Unicode standard considers anything above 0x10FFFF to be
 illegal, but there are standards predating it that allow up to 0x7FFF_FFFF
@@ -1393,7 +1393,7 @@ C<UTF8_DISALLOW_NONCHAR> or the C<UTF8_WARN_NONCHAR> flags.
 
 The input sequence was malformed in that a non-continuation type byte was found
 in a position where only a continuation type one should be.  See also
-L</C<UTF8_GOT_SHORT>>.
+C<L</UTF8_GOT_SHORT>>.
 
 =item C<UTF8_GOT_OVERFLOW>
 
diff --git a/utf8.h b/utf8.h
index 9a2aea9..59d7df3 100644 (file)
--- a/utf8.h
+++ b/utf8.h
@@ -539,16 +539,16 @@ If there is a possibility of malformed input, use instead:
 
 =over
 
-=item L</C<UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>> if you know the maximum ending pointer in the
+=item C<L</UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>> if you know the maximum ending pointer in the
 buffer pointed to by C<s>; or
 
-=item L</C<UTF8_CHK_SKIP>> if you don't know it.
+=item C<L</UTF8_CHK_SKIP>> if you don't know it.
 
 =back
 
 It is better to restructure your code so the end pointer is passed down so that
 you know what it actually is at the point of this call, but if that isn't
-possible, L</C<UTF8_CHK_SKIP>> can minimize the chance of accessing beyond the end
+possible, C<L</UTF8_CHK_SKIP>> can minimize the chance of accessing beyond the end
 of the input buffer.
 
 =cut
@@ -557,7 +557,7 @@ of the input buffer.
 
 /*
 =for apidoc Am|STRLEN|UTF8_SKIP|char* s
-This is a synonym for L</C<UTF8SKIP>>
+This is a synonym for C<L</UTF8SKIP>>
 
 =cut
 */
@@ -567,8 +567,8 @@ This is a synonym for L</C<UTF8SKIP>>
 /*
 =for apidoc Am|STRLEN|UTF8_CHK_SKIP|char* s
 
-This is a safer version of L</C<UTF8SKIP>>, but still not as safe as
-L</C<UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>>.  This version doesn't blindly assume that the input
+This is a safer version of C<L</UTF8SKIP>>, but still not as safe as
+C<L</UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>>.  This version doesn't blindly assume that the input
 string pointed to by C<s> is well-formed, but verifies that there isn't a NUL
 terminating character before the expected end of the next character in C<s>.
 The length C<UTF8_CHK_SKIP> returns stops just before any such NUL.
@@ -579,7 +579,7 @@ beyond the end of the input buffer, even if it is malformed UTF-8.
 
 This macro is intended to be used by XS modules where the inputs could be
 malformed, and it isn't feasible to restructure to use the safer
-L</C<UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>>, for example when interfacing with a C library.
+C<L</UTF8_SAFE_SKIP>>, for example when interfacing with a C library.
 
 =cut
 */