This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
PATCH: minor typo cleanup of pod/ directory
authorTom Christiansen <tchrist@perl.com>
Tue, 5 Jan 2010 03:32:51 +0000 (20:32 -0700)
committerAbigail <abigail@abigail.be>
Tue, 5 Jan 2010 08:24:38 +0000 (09:24 +0100)
These are all in the pod/ directory, and only the first is a code fix.
There was also a single lingering ISO 8859-1 encoding that missed the
UTF-8 upconvert.  The rest are cleanups for typos, some of which seem
to have been around for a rather long time: spelling errors, incorrect
possessives, and extra, missing, or duplicated words.

If you actually read through, I bet you'll realize what sparked this. :)

--tom

Signed-off-by: Abigail <abigail@abigail.be>
41 files changed:
pod/buildtoc
pod/perl5100delta.pod
pod/perl5101delta.pod
pod/perl5110delta.pod
pod/perl5113delta.pod
pod/perl570delta.pod
pod/perl571delta.pod
pod/perl572delta.pod
pod/perl573delta.pod
pod/perl581delta.pod
pod/perl588delta.pod
pod/perl589delta.pod
pod/perl58delta.pod
pod/perl590delta.pod
pod/perl593delta.pod
pod/perlembed.pod
pod/perlfaq.pod
pod/perlfaq2.pod
pod/perlfaq3.pod
pod/perlfaq4.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfaq8.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perliol.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlnewmod.pod
pod/perlopentut.pod
pod/perlperf.pod
pod/perlpod.pod
pod/perlpodspec.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlreguts.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perlutil.pod
pod/perlvms.pod

index 83eb447..4dd4271 100755 (executable)
@@ -763,7 +763,7 @@ while (my ($target, $name) = each %Targets) {
   rename $name, "$name.old" or die "$0: Can't rename $name to $name.old: $!";
   open THING, ">$name" or die "$0: Can't open $name for writing: $!";
   print THING $new or die "$0: print to $name failed: $!";
-  close THING or die die "$0: close $name failed: $!";
+  close THING or die "$0: close $name failed: $!";
 }
 
 warn "$0: was not instructed to build anything\n" unless $built;
index fe9f02e..263f158 100644 (file)
@@ -440,7 +440,7 @@ with it. (Larry Wall, Nicholas Clark)
 =head2 kill() on Windows
 
 On Windows platforms, C<kill(-9, $pid)> now kills a process tree.
-(On UNIX, this delivers the signal to all processes in the same process
+(On Unix, this delivers the signal to all processes in the same process
 group.)
 
 =head1 Incompatible Changes
@@ -1468,7 +1468,7 @@ to reflect this.)
 
 =head2 Elimination of SVt_PVBM
 
-Related to this, the internal type C<SVt_PVBM> has been been removed. This
+Related to this, the internal type C<SVt_PVBM> has been removed. This
 dedicated type of C<SV> was used by the C<index> operator and parts of the
 regexp engine to facilitate fast Boyer-Moore matches. Its use internally has
 been replaced by C<SV>s of type C<SVt_PVGV>.
index f7b9ec1..c6cdef9 100644 (file)
@@ -1149,7 +1149,7 @@ file. This eliminates a potential race condition [RT #60904].
 
 =item *
 
-On some UNIX systems, the value in C<$?> would not have the top bit set
+On some Unix systems, the value in C<$?> would not have the top bit set
 (C<$? & 128>) even if the child core dumped.
 
 =item *
index c49c559..1b722ed 100644 (file)
@@ -858,7 +858,7 @@ file. This eliminates a potential race condition [RT #60904].
 
 =item *
 
-On some UNIX systems, the value in C<$?> would not have the top bit set
+On some Unix systems, the value in C<$?> would not have the top bit set
 (C<$? & 128>) even if the child core dumped.
 
 =item *
index 55fe29d..77918e2 100644 (file)
@@ -425,7 +425,7 @@ Numerous bugfixes catch small issues caused by the recently-added Lexer API.
 
 =item *
 
-Smart match against C<@_> sometimes gave false negatives negatives. [perl #71078]
+Smart match against C<@_> sometimes gave false negatives. [perl #71078]
 
 =item *
 
index 20abcd6..dcc2f0f 100644 (file)
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ perl.org, not perl.com.
 =item *
 
 The perlcc utility has been rewritten and its user interface (that is,
-command line) is much more like that of the UNIX C compiler, cc.
+command line) is much more like that of the Unix C compiler, cc.
 
 =item *
 
index 56eb74f..d25bee0 100644 (file)
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ The built-in layers are: unix (low level read/write), stdio (as in
 previous Perls), perlio (re-implementation of stdio buffering in a
 portable manner), crlf (does CRLF <=> "\n" translation as on Win32,
 but available on any platform).  A mmap layer may be available if
-platform supports it (mostly UNIXes).
+platform supports it (mostly Unixes).
 
 Layers to be applied by default may be specified via the 'open' pragma.
 
@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@ That is a literal undef, not an undefined value.
 
 =item *
 
-The list form of C<open> is now implemented for pipes (at least on UNIX):
+The list form of C<open> is now implemented for pipes (at least on Unix):
 
    open($fh,"-|", 'cat', '/etc/motd')
 
index fc5c392..21585ed 100644 (file)
@@ -409,7 +409,7 @@ NetWare from Novell is now supported.  See L<perlnetware>.
 
 =item *
 
-The Amdahl UTS UNIX mainframe platform is now supported.
+The Amdahl UTS Unix mainframe platform is now supported.
 
 =back
 
index 42ed261..00e73fe 100644 (file)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ The numbers refer to the Perl repository change numbers; see
 L<Changes58> (or L<Changes> in Perl 5.8.1).  In addition to these
 changes, lots of work took place in integrating threads, PerlIO, and
 Unicode; general code cleanup; and last but not least porting to
-non-UNIX lands such as Win32, VMS, Cygwin, DJGPP, VOS, MacOS Classic,
+non-Unix lands such as Win32, VMS, Cygwin, DJGPP, VOS, MacOS Classic,
 and EBCDIC.
 
 =over 4
index ecefbf7..cd88c73 100644 (file)
@@ -506,9 +506,9 @@ perlreref has been added: it is a regular expressions quick reference.
 
 =head1 Installation and Configuration Improvements
 
-The UNIX standard Perl location, F</usr/bin/perl>, is no longer
+The Unix standard Perl location, F</usr/bin/perl>, is no longer
 overwritten by default if it exists.  This change was very prudent
-because so many UNIX vendors already provide a F</usr/bin/perl>,
+because so many Unix vendors already provide a F</usr/bin/perl>,
 but simultaneously many system utilities may depend on that
 exact version of Perl, so better not to overwrite it.
 
index 16082b5..a3d1df3 100644 (file)
@@ -1472,7 +1472,7 @@ Trailing spaces are now trimmed from C<$!> and C<$^E>.
 
 =item *
 
-Operations that require perl to read a process' list of groups, such as reads
+Operations that require perl to read a process's list of groups, such as reads
 of C<$(> and C<$)>, now dynamically allocate memory rather than using a
 fixed sized array. The fixed size array could cause C stack exhaustion on
 systems configured to use large numbers of groups.
index d4bafa1..2070cc3 100644 (file)
@@ -1166,7 +1166,7 @@ between C<""> and C<< E<lt>E<gt> >> quoting in C<#include> statements.
 
 =item *
 
-now generates correct correct code for C<#if defined A || defined B>
+now generates correct code for C<#if defined A || defined B>
 [RT #39130]
 
 =back
@@ -1834,7 +1834,7 @@ The reference count of C<PerlIO> file descriptors is now correctly handled.
 
 =item *
 
-On VMS, escaped dots will be preserved when converted to UNIX syntax.
+On VMS, escaped dots will be preserved when converted to Unix syntax.
 
 =item *
 
@@ -2096,7 +2096,7 @@ Calls all tests in F<t/op/inccode.t> after first tying C<@INC>.
 
 =item t/op/incfilter.t
 
-Tests for for source filters returned from code references in C<@INC>.
+Tests for source filters returned from code references in C<@INC>.
 
 =item t/op/kill0.t
 
index a3a0d8a..f3a8679 100644 (file)
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ to be aliases for d/f, but you never knew that.)
 
 The list of filenames from glob() (or <...>) is now by default sorted
 alphabetically to be csh-compliant (which is what happened before
-in most UNIX platforms).  (bsd_glob() does still sort platform
+in most Unix platforms).  (bsd_glob() does still sort platform
 natively, ASCII or EBCDIC, unless GLOB_ALPHASORT is specified.) [561]
 
 =head2 Deprecations
@@ -381,7 +381,7 @@ The built-in layers are: unix (low level read/write), stdio (as in
 previous Perls), perlio (re-implementation of stdio buffering in a
 portable manner), crlf (does CRLF <=> "\n" translation as on Win32,
 but available on any platform).  A mmap layer may be available if
-platform supports it (mostly UNIXes).
+platform supports it (mostly Unixes).
 
 Layers to be applied by default may be specified via the 'open' pragma.
 
@@ -1505,7 +1505,7 @@ perl.org, not perl.com.
 =item *
 
 C<perlcc> has been rewritten and its user interface (that is,
-command line) is much more like that of the UNIX C compiler, cc.
+command line) is much more like that of the Unix C compiler, cc.
 (The perlbc tools has been removed.  Use C<perlcc -B> instead.)
 B<Note that perlcc is still considered very experimental and
 unsupported.> [561]
@@ -1531,7 +1531,7 @@ C<pod2html> now produces XHTML 1.0.
 =item *
 
 C<pod2html> now understands POD written using different line endings
-(PC-like CRLF versus UNIX-like LF versus MacClassic-like CR).
+(PC-like CRLF versus Unix-like LF versus MacClassic-like CR).
 
 =item *
 
@@ -2083,7 +2083,7 @@ available.  See L<perlvos>. [561+]
 
 =item *
 
-The Amdahl UTS UNIX mainframe platform is now supported. [561]
+The Amdahl UTS Unix mainframe platform is now supported. [561]
 
 =item *
 
index db6f599..a19bf7a 100644 (file)
@@ -487,9 +487,9 @@ perlreref has been added: it is a regular expressions quick reference.
 
 =head1 Installation and Configuration Improvements
 
-The UNIX standard Perl location, F</usr/bin/perl>, is no longer
+The Unix standard Perl location, F</usr/bin/perl>, is no longer
 overwritten by default if it exists.  This change was very prudent
-because so many UNIX vendors already provide a F</usr/bin/perl>,
+because so many Unix vendors already provide a F</usr/bin/perl>,
 but simultaneously many system utilities may depend on that
 exact version of Perl, so better not to overwrite it.
 
index d67a5a5..6c8587a 100644 (file)
@@ -390,7 +390,7 @@ Trailing spaces are now trimmed from C<$!> and C<$^E>.
 
 =item *
 
-Operations that require perl to read a process' list of groups, such as reads
+Operations that require perl to read a process's list of groups, such as reads
 of C<$(> and C<$)>, now dynamically allocate memory rather than using a
 fixed sized array. The fixed size array could cause C stack exhaustion on
 systems configured to use large numbers of groups.
index 36da54f..5ecaed0 100644 (file)
@@ -1100,7 +1100,7 @@ Finally, select Build -> Build interp.exe and you're ready to go.
 
 =head1 Hiding Perl_
 
-If you completely hide the short forms forms of the Perl public API,
+If you completely hide the short forms of the Perl public API,
 add -DPERL_NO_SHORT_NAMES to the compilation flags.  This means that
 for example instead of writing
 
index 96623ad..4f805ec 100644 (file)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ into nine major sections outlined in this document.
 
 The perlfaq comes with the standard Perl distribution, so if you have Perl
 you should have the perlfaq. You should also have the C<perldoc> tool
-that let's you read the L<perlfaq>:
+that lets you read the L<perlfaq>:
 
        $ perldoc perlfaq
 
@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ it, try the resources in L<perlfaq2>.
 
 Tom Christiansen wrote the original perlfaq then expanded it with the
 help of Nat Torkington. The perlfaq-workers maintain current document
-and the dezinens of comp.lang.perl.misc regularly review and update the
+and the denizens of comp.lang.perl.misc regularly review and update the
 FAQ. Several people have contributed answers, corrections, and comments,
 and the perlfaq notes those contributions wherever appropriate.
 
@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ and the perlfaq notes those contributions wherever appropriate.
 Copyright (c) 1997-2009 Tom Christiansen, Nathan Torkington, and
 other authors as noted. All rights reserved.
 
-Tom Christainsen wrote the original version of this document.
+Tom Christiansen wrote the original version of this document.
 brian d foy C<< <bdfoy@cpan.org> >> wrote this version. See the
 individual perlfaq documents for additional copyright information.
 
@@ -1440,4 +1440,3 @@ How can I do RPC in Perl?
 
 =back
 
-
index d558172..4aa420a 100644 (file)
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ including setting the Followup-To header line to NOT include alt.sources;
 see their FAQ ( http://www.faqs.org/faqs/alt-sources-intro/ ) for details.
 
 If you're just looking for software, first use Google
-( http://www.google.com ), Google's usenet search interface
+( http://www.google.com ), Google's USENET search interface
 ( http://groups.google.com ),  and CPAN Search ( http://search.cpan.org ).
 This is faster and more productive than just posting a request.
 
index 6b2a046..7be2379 100644 (file)
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ You might also try pltags: http://www.mscha.com/pltags.zip
 
 Perl programs are just plain text, so any editor will do.
 
-If you're on Unix, you already have an IDE--Unix itself.  The UNIX
+If you're on Unix, you already have an IDE--Unix itself.  The Unix
 philosophy is the philosophy of several small tools that each do one
 thing and do it well.  It's like a carpenter's toolbox.
 
@@ -425,7 +425,7 @@ For vi lovers in general, Windows or elsewhere:
 
 nvi ( http://www.bostic.com/vi/ , available from CPAN in src/misc/) is
 yet another vi clone, unfortunately not available for Windows, but in
-UNIX platforms you might be interested in trying it out, firstly because
+Unix platforms you might be interested in trying it out, firstly because
 strictly speaking it is not a vi clone, it is the real vi, or the new
 incarnation of it, and secondly because you can embed Perl inside it
 to use Perl as the scripting language.  nvi is not alone in this,
@@ -489,7 +489,7 @@ MKS and U/WIN are commercial (U/WIN is free for educational and
 research purposes), Cygwin is covered by the GNU General Public
 License (but that shouldn't matter for Perl use).  The Cygwin, MKS,
 and U/WIN all contain (in addition to the shells) a comprehensive set
-of standard UNIX toolkit utilities.
+of standard Unix toolkit utilities.
 
 If you're transferring text files between Unix and Windows using FTP
 be sure to transfer them in ASCII mode so the ends of lines are
@@ -912,7 +912,7 @@ executables for HP-UX, Linux, Solaris and Windows."
 
 Perl2Exe ( http://www.indigostar.com/perl2exe.htm ) is a command line
 program for converting perl scripts to executable files.  It targets both
-Windows and unix platforms.
+Windows and Unix platforms.
 
 =head2 How can I get C<#!perl> to work on [MS-DOS,NT,...]?
 
@@ -1080,7 +1080,7 @@ or
 
 The C<ExtUtils::MakeMaker> module, better known simply as "MakeMaker",
 turns a Perl script, typically called C<Makefile.PL>, into a Makefile.
-The unix tool C<make> uses this file to manage dependencies and actions
+The Unix tool C<make> uses this file to manage dependencies and actions
 to process and install a Perl distribution.
 
 =head1 REVISION
index 8d5e2e6..5549634 100644 (file)
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ are in base 10:
        print $string + 44; # prints 688, certainly not octal!
 
 This problem usually involves one of the Perl built-ins that has the
-same name a unix command that uses octal numbers as arguments on the
+same name a Unix command that uses octal numbers as arguments on the
 command line. In this example, C<chmod> on the command line knows that
 its first argument is octal because that's what it does:
 
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ doesn't matter and you end up with the previous date.
 
 (contributed by brian d foy)
 
-Perl itself never had a Y2K problem, although that nevers stopped people
+Perl itself never had a Y2K problem, although that never stopped people
 from creating Y2K problems on their own. See the documentation for
 C<localtime> for its proper use.
 
index bc2f4f6..a74ff1f 100644 (file)
@@ -656,7 +656,7 @@ see L<perltoot/"Overridden Methods">.
 Calling a subroutine as C<&foo> with no trailing parentheses ignores
 the prototype of C<foo> and passes it the current value of the argument
 list, C<@_>. Here's an example; the C<bar> subroutine calls C<&foo>,
-which prints what its arguments list:
+which prints its argument list:
 
        sub bar { &foo }
 
index adda585..0fd322e 100644 (file)
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ It even includes limited support for Windows.
 
 However, using the code requires that you have a working C compiler
 and can use it to build and install a CPAN module.  Here's a solution
-using the standard C<POSIX> module, which is already on your systems
+using the standard C<POSIX> module, which is already on your system
 (assuming your system supports POSIX).
 
        use HotKey;
@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ C<IPC::Open3>, C<IPC::Run>, C<Parallel::Jobs>, C<Parallel::ForkManager>, C<POE>,
 C<Proc::Background>, and C<Win32::Process>. There are many other modules you
 might use, so check those namespaces for other options too.
 
-If you are on a unix-like system, you might be able to get away with a
+If you are on a Unix-like system, you might be able to get away with a
 system call where you put an C<&> on the end of the command:
 
        system("cmd &")
@@ -494,7 +494,7 @@ the VMS equivalent is C<set time>.
 However, if all you want to do is change your time zone, you can
 probably get away with setting an environment variable:
 
-       $ENV{TZ} = "MST7MDT";              # unixish
+       $ENV{TZ} = "MST7MDT";              # Unixish
        $ENV{'SYS$TIMEZONE_DIFFERENTIAL'}="-5" # vms
        system "trn comp.lang.perl.misc";
 
@@ -864,7 +864,7 @@ stuck, because Windows does not have an argc/argv-style API.
 =head2 Why can't my script read from STDIN after I gave it EOF (^D on Unix, ^Z on MS-DOS)?
 
 This happens only if your perl is compiled to use stdio instead of
-perlio, which is the default. Some (maybe all?) stdio's set error and
+perlio, which is the default. Some (maybe all?) stdios set error and
 eof flags that you may need to clear. The C<POSIX> module defines
 C<clearerr()> that you can use.  That is the technically correct way to
 do it.  Here are some less reliable workarounds:
index 114d4da..a40fbc3 100644 (file)
@@ -1022,7 +1022,7 @@ Traditionally the result is a string of 13 bytes: two first bytes of
 the salt, followed by 11 bytes from the set C<[./0-9A-Za-z]>, and only
 the first eight bytes of PLAINTEXT mattered. But alternative
 hashing schemes (like MD5), higher level security schemes (like C2),
-and implementations on non-UNIX platforms may produce different
+and implementations on non-Unix platforms may produce different
 strings.
 
 When choosing a new salt create a random two character string whose
@@ -3194,7 +3194,7 @@ C<< '+<' >> is almost always preferred for read/write updates--the C<<
 either read-write mode for updating textfiles, since they have
 variable length records.  See the B<-i> switch in L<perlrun> for a
 better approach.  The file is created with permissions of C<0666>
-modified by the process' C<umask> value.
+modified by the process's C<umask> value.
 
 These various prefixes correspond to the fopen(3) modes of C<'r'>,
 C<'r+'>, C<'w'>, C<'w+'>, C<'a'>, and C<'a+'>.
@@ -3405,7 +3405,7 @@ the same file descriptor.
 
 Note that if you are using Perls older than 5.8.0, Perl will be using
 the standard C libraries' fdopen() to implement the "=" functionality.
-On many UNIX systems fdopen() fails when file descriptors exceed a
+On many Unix systems fdopen() fails when file descriptors exceed a
 certain value, typically 255.  For Perls 5.8.0 and later, PerlIO is
 most often the default.
 
@@ -3440,7 +3440,7 @@ The following triples are more or less equivalent:
 The last example in each block shows the pipe as "list form", which is
 not yet supported on all platforms.  A good rule of thumb is that if
 your platform has true C<fork()> (in other words, if your platform is
-UNIX) you can use the list form.
+Unix) you can use the list form.
 
 See L<perlipc/"Safe Pipe Opens"> for more examples of this.
 
@@ -4165,7 +4165,7 @@ C<$::sail> is equivalent to C<$main::sail> (as well as to C<$main'sail>,
 still seen in older code).
 
 If VERSION is provided, C<package> also sets the C<$VERSION> variable in the
-given namespace.  VERSION must be be a numeric literal or v-string; it is
+given namespace.  VERSION must be a numeric literal or v-string; it is
 parsed exactly the same way as a VERSION argument to C<use MODULE VERSION>.
 C<$VERSION> should only be set once per package.
 
@@ -4280,7 +4280,7 @@ function has no prototype).  FUNCTION is a reference to, or the name of,
 the function whose prototype you want to retrieve.
 
 If FUNCTION is a string starting with C<CORE::>, the rest is taken as a
-name for Perl builtin.  If the builtin is not I<overridable> (such as
+name for Perl builtin.  If the builtin is not I<overridable> (such as
 C<qw//>) or if its arguments cannot be adequately expressed by a prototype
 (such as C<system>), prototype() returns C<undef>, because the builtin
 does not really behave like a Perl function.  Otherwise, the string
@@ -4902,7 +4902,7 @@ Deletes the directory specified by FILENAME if that directory is
 empty.  If it succeeds it returns true, otherwise it returns false and
 sets C<$!> (errno).  If FILENAME is omitted, uses C<$_>.
 
-To remove a directory tree recursively (C<rm -rf> on unix) look at
+To remove a directory tree recursively (C<rm -rf> on Unix) look at
 the C<rmtree> function of the L<File::Path> module.
 
 =item s///
@@ -6488,7 +6488,7 @@ Better to omit it.  See the perlfunc(1) entry on C<umask> for more
 on this.
 
 Note that C<sysopen> depends on the fdopen() C library function.
-On many UNIX systems, fdopen() is known to fail when file descriptors
+On many Unix systems, fdopen() is known to fail when file descriptors
 exceed a certain value, typically 255. If you need more file
 descriptors than that, consider rebuilding Perl to use the C<sfio>
 library, or perhaps using the POSIX::open() function.
index a964fa8..fb9bdb8 100644 (file)
@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@ Configure, build and installation process, as well as the overall
 portability of the core code rests with the Configure pumpkin -
 others help out with individual operating systems.
 
-The three files that fall under his/her resposibility are Configure,
+The three files that fall under his/her responsibility are Configure,
 config_h.SH, and Porting/Glossary (and a whole bunch of small related
 files that are less important here). The Configure pumpkin decides how
 patches to these are dealt with. Currently, the Configure pumpkin will
@@ -2598,7 +2598,7 @@ not perfect, because the below is a compile-time check):
   #endif
 
 How does the HAS_QUUX become defined where it needs to be?  Well, if
-Foonix happens to be UNIXy enough to be able to run the Configure
+Foonix happens to be Unixy enough to be able to run the Configure
 script, and Configure has been taught about detecting and testing
 quux(), the HAS_QUUX will be correctly defined.  In other platforms,
 the corresponding configuration step will hopefully do the same.
@@ -2699,7 +2699,7 @@ and for Bourne-type shells:
     PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL=2
     export PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL
 
-or in UNIXy environments you can also use the C<env> command:
+or in Unixy environments you can also use the C<env> command:
 
     env PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL=2 valgrind ./perl -Ilib ...
 
@@ -3010,7 +3010,7 @@ results.
 
 =head2 Gprof Profiling
 
-gprof is a profiling tool available in many UNIX platforms,
+gprof is a profiling tool available in many Unix platforms,
 it uses F<statistical time-sampling>.
 
 You can build a profiled version of perl called "perl.gprof" by
index a560d97..e814847 100644 (file)
@@ -70,10 +70,10 @@ handling binary data.  The "pushed" layers are processed in left-to-right
 order.
 
 sysopen() operates (unsurprisingly) at a lower level in the stack than
-open().  For example in UNIX or UNIX-like systems sysopen() operates
+open().  For example in Unix or Unix-like systems sysopen() operates
 directly at the level of file descriptors: in the terms of PerlIO
 layers, it uses only the "unix" layer, which is a rather thin wrapper
-on top of the UNIX file descriptors.
+on top of the Unix file descriptors.
 
 =head2 Layers vs Disciplines
 
@@ -837,7 +837,7 @@ The following table summarizes the behaviour:
     Unread      PerlIOBase_unread
     Write       FAILURE
 
- FAILURE        Set errno (to EINVAL in UNIXish, to LIB$_INVARG in VMS) and
+ FAILURE        Set errno (to EINVAL in Unixish, to LIB$_INVARG in VMS) and
                 return -1 (for numeric return values) or NULL (for pointers)
  INHERITED      Inherited from the layer below
  SUCCESS        Return 0 (for numeric return values) or a pointer 
index 6424615..962d106 100644 (file)
@@ -718,7 +718,7 @@ the pipe and expecting an EOF will never receive it, and therefore
 never exit.  A single process closing a pipe is not enough to close it;
 the last process with the pipe open must close it for it to read EOF.
 
-There are some features built-in to unix to help prevent this most of
+Certain built-in Unix features help prevent this most of
 the time.  For instance, filehandles have a 'close on exec' flag (set
 I<en masse> with Perl using the C<$^F> L<perlvar>), so that any
 filehandles which you didn't explicitly route to the STDIN, STDOUT or
index 918abfc..0dbabe7 100644 (file)
@@ -434,7 +434,7 @@ parameters as integers correctly formatted in the current locale:
 =head2 I18N::Langinfo
 
 Another interface for querying locale-dependent information is the
-I18N::Langinfo::langinfo() function, available at least in UNIX-like
+I18N::Langinfo::langinfo() function, available at least in Unix-like
 systems and VMS.
 
 The following example will import the langinfo() function itself and
@@ -861,7 +861,7 @@ set, it overrides all the rest of the locale environment variables.
 
 B<NOTE>: C<LANGUAGE> is a GNU extension, it affects you only if you
 are using the GNU libc.  This is the case if you are using e.g. Linux.
-If you are using "commercial" UNIXes you are most probably I<not>
+If you are using "commercial" Unixes you are most probably I<not>
 using GNU libc and you can ignore C<LANGUAGE>.
 
 However, in the case you are using C<LANGUAGE>: it affects the
index d8bd400..7555f97 100644 (file)
@@ -276,5 +276,5 @@ Updated by Kirrily "Skud" Robert, C<skud@cpan.org>
 L<perlmod>, L<perlmodlib>, L<perlmodinstall>, L<h2xs>, L<strict>,
 L<Carp>, L<Exporter>, L<perlpod>, L<Test::Simple>, L<Test::More>
 L<ExtUtils::MakeMaker>, L<Module::Build>, L<Module::Starter>
-http://www.cpan.org/ , Ken Williams' tutorial on building your own
+http://www.cpan.org/ , Ken Williams's tutorial on building your own
 module at http://mathforum.org/~ken/perl_modules.html
index 9139ebc..ea4b307 100644 (file)
@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ be 0777, and for anything else, 0666.
 Why so permissive?  Well, it isn't really.  The MASK will be modified
 by your process's current C<umask>.  A umask is a number representing
 I<disabled> permissions bits; that is, bits that will not be turned on
-in the created files' permissions field.
+in the created file's permissions field.
 
 For example, if your C<umask> were 027, then the 020 part would
 disable the group from writing, and the 007 part would disable others
index 9384d53..a934271 100644 (file)
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ optimization process.
 Firstly, you need to establish a baseline time for the existing code, which
 timing needs to be reliable and repeatable.  You'll probably want to use the
 C<Benchmark> or C<Devel::DProf> modules, or something similar, for this step,
-or perhaps the unix system C<time> utility, whichever is appropriate.  See the
+or perhaps the Unix system C<time> utility, whichever is appropriate.  See the
 base of this document for a longer list of benchmarking and profiling modules,
 and recommended further reading.
 
@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ it managed to execute an average of 628,930 times a second during our test, the
 direct approach managed to run an additional 204,403 times, unfortunately.
 Unfortunately, because there are many examples of code written using the
 multiple layer direct variable access, and it's usually horrible.  It is,
-however, miniscully faster.  The question remains whether the minute gain is
+however, minusculy faster.  The question remains whether the minute gain is
 actually worth the eyestrain, or the loss of maintainability.
 
 =head2  Search and replace or tr
@@ -214,8 +214,7 @@ Running the code gives us our results:
             tr:  0 wallclock secs ( 0.49 usr +  0.00 sys =  0.49 CPU) @ 2040816.33/s (n=1000000)
 
 The C<tr> version is a clear winner.  One solution is flexible, the other is
-fast - and it's appropriately the programmers choice which to use in the
-circumstances.
+fast - and it's appropriately the programmer's choice which to use.
 
 Check the C<Benchmark> docs for further useful techniques.
 
@@ -446,7 +445,7 @@ reader program.  C<dprofpp> usage is therefore identical to the above example.
 Interestingly we get slightly different results, which is mostly because the
 algorithm which generates the report is different, even though the output file
 format was allegedly identical.  The elapsed, user and system times are clearly
-showing the time it took for C<Devel::Profiler> to execute it's own run, but
+showing the time it took for C<Devel::Profiler> to execute its own run, but
 the column listings feel more accurate somehow than the ones we had earlier
 from C<Devel::DProf>.  The 102% figure has disappeared, for example.  This is
 where we have to use the tools at our disposal, and recognise their pros and
@@ -598,7 +597,7 @@ the code.
 C<NYTProf> will generate a report database into the file F<nytprof.out> by
 default.  Human readable reports can be generated from here by using the
 supplied C<nytprofhtml> (HTML output) and C<nytprofcsv> (CSV output) programs.
-We've used the unix sytem C<html2text> utility to convert the
+We've used the Unix sytem C<html2text> utility to convert the
 F<nytprof/index.html> file for convenience here.
 
     $> html2text nytprof/index.html
@@ -762,7 +761,7 @@ be quite useful as a simple filter:
 
 A command such as this can vastly reduce the volume of material to actually
 sort through in the first place, and should not be too lightly disregarded
-purely on the basis of it's simplicity.  The C<KISS> principle is too often
+purely on the basis of its simplicity.  The C<KISS> principle is too often
 overlooked - the next example uses the simple system C<time> utility to
 demonstrate.  Let's take a look at an actual example of sorting the contents of
 a large file, an apache logfile would do.  This one has over a quarter of a
@@ -945,7 +944,7 @@ Run the new code against the same logfile, as above, to check the new time.
 
 The time has been cut in half, which is a respectable speed improvement by any
 standard.  Naturally, it is important to check the output is consistent with
-the first program run, this is where the unix system C<cksum> utility comes in.
+the first program run, this is where the Unix system C<cksum> utility comes in.
 
     $> cksum out-sort out-schwarz
     3044173777 52029194 out-sort
index 55ea57e..2f4e5c5 100644 (file)
@@ -383,7 +383,7 @@ C<LE<lt>nameE<gt>>
 
 Link to a Perl manual page (e.g., C<LE<lt>Net::PingE<gt>>).  Note
 that C<name> should not contain spaces.  This syntax
-is also occasionally used for references to UNIX man pages, as in
+is also occasionally used for references to Unix man pages, as in
 C<LE<lt>crontab(5)E<gt>>.
 
 =item *
index 7ab5659..da62a35 100644 (file)
@@ -1331,13 +1331,13 @@ that case, formatters will have to just ignore that formatting.
 At time of writing, C<LE<lt>nameE<gt>> values are of two types:
 either the name of a Pod page like C<LE<lt>Foo::BarE<gt>> (which
 might be a real Perl module or program in an @INC / PATH
-directory, or a .pod file in those places); or the name of a UNIX
+directory, or a .pod file in those places); or the name of a Unix
 man page, like C<LE<lt>crontab(5)E<gt>>.  In theory, C<LE<lt>chmodE<gt>>
 in ambiguous between a Pod page called "chmod", or the Unix man page
 "chmod" (in whatever man-section).  However, the presence of a string
 in parens, as in "crontab(5)", is sufficient to signal that what
 is being discussed is not a Pod page, and so is presumably a
-UNIX man page.  The distinction is of no importance to many
+Unix man page.  The distinction is of no importance to many
 Pod processors, but some processors that render to hypertext formats
 may need to distinguish them in order to know how to render a
 given C<LE<lt>fooE<gt>> code.
index 8deecdf..1bcc477 100644 (file)
@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ modification timestamp), or one second granularity of any timestamps
 (e.g. the FAT filesystem limits the time granularity to two seconds).
 
 The "inode change timestamp" (the C<-C> filetest) may really be the
-"creation timestamp" (which it is not in UNIX).
+"creation timestamp" (which it is not in Unix).
 
 VOS perl can emulate Unix filenames with C</> as path separator.  The
 native pathname characters greater-than, less-than, number-sign, and
@@ -281,10 +281,10 @@ S<RISC OS> perl can emulate Unix filenames with C</> as path
 separator, or go native and use C<.> for path separator and C<:> to
 signal filesystems and disk names.
 
-Don't assume UNIX filesystem access semantics: that read, write,
+Don't assume Unix filesystem access semantics: that read, write,
 and execute are all the permissions there are, and even if they exist,
 that their semantics (for example what do r, w, and x mean on
-a directory) are the UNIX ones.  The various UNIX/POSIX compatibility
+a directory) are the Unix ones.  The various Unix/POSIX compatibility
 layers usually try to make interfaces like chmod() work, but sometimes
 there simply is no good mapping.
 
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ is usually best to know what type of system you will be running
 under so that you can write code explicitly for that platform (or
 class of platforms).
 
-Don't assume the UNIX filesystem access semantics: the operating
+Don't assume the Unix filesystem access semantics: the operating
 system or the filesystem may be using some ACL systems, which are
 richer languages than the usual rwx.  Even if the rwx exist,
 their semantics might be different.
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ for race conditions-- someone or something might change the
 permissions between the permissions check and the actual operation.
 Just try the operation.)
 
-Don't assume the UNIX user and group semantics: especially, don't
+Don't assume the Unix user and group semantics: especially, don't
 expect the C<< $< >> and C<< $> >> (or the C<$(> and C<$)>) to work
 for switching identities (or memberships).
 
@@ -1020,7 +1020,7 @@ Unicode characters.  Characters that could be misinterpreted by the DCL
 shell or file parsing utilities need to be prefixed with the C<^>
 character, or replaced with hexadecimal characters prefixed with the
 C<^> character.  Such prefixing is only needed with the pathnames are
-in VMS format in applications.  Programs that can accept the UNIX format
+in VMS format in applications.  Programs that can accept the Unix format
 of pathnames do not need the escape characters.  The maximum length for
 filenames is 255 characters.  The ODS-5 file system can handle both
 a case preserved and a case sensitive mode.
@@ -1031,34 +1031,34 @@ Support for the extended file specifications is being done as optional
 settings to preserve backward compatibility with Perl scripts that
 assume the previous VMS limitations.
 
-In general routines on VMS that get a UNIX format file specification
-should return it in a UNIX format, and when they get a VMS format
+In general routines on VMS that get a Unix format file specification
+should return it in a Unix format, and when they get a VMS format
 specification they should return a VMS format unless they are documented
 to do a conversion.
 
 For routines that generate return a file specification, VMS allows setting
 if the C library which Perl is built on if it will be returned in VMS
-format or in UNIX format.
+format or in Unix format.
 
 With the ODS-2 file system, there is not much difference in syntax of
-filenames without paths for VMS or UNIX.  With the extended character
+filenames without paths for VMS or Unix.  With the extended character
 set available with ODS-5 there can be a significant difference.
 
 Because of this, existing Perl scripts written for VMS were sometimes
-treating VMS and UNIX filenames interchangeably.  Without the extended
+treating VMS and Unix filenames interchangeably.  Without the extended
 character set enabled, this behavior will mostly be maintained for
 backwards compatibility.
 
 When extended characters are enabled with ODS-5, the handling of
-UNIX formatted file specifications is to that of a UNIX system.
+Unix formatted file specifications is to that of a Unix system.
 
 VMS file specifications without extensions have a trailing dot.  An
-equivalent UNIX file specification should not show the trailing dot.
+equivalent Unix file specification should not show the trailing dot.
 
 The result of all of this, is that for VMS, for portable scripts, you
 can not depend on Perl to present the filenames in lowercase, to be
 case sensitive, and that the filenames could be returned in either
-UNIX or VMS format.
+Unix or VMS format.
 
 And if a routine returns a file specification, unless it is intended to
 convert it, it should return it in the same format as it found it.
@@ -1073,7 +1073,7 @@ return F<a.> when VMS is (though that file could be opened with
 C<open(FH, 'A')>).
 
 With support for extended file specifications and if C<opendir> was
-given a UNIX format directory, a file named F<A.;5> will return F<a>
+given a Unix format directory, a file named F<A.;5> will return F<a>
 and optionally in the exact case on the disk.  When C<opendir> is given
 a VMS format directory, then C<readdir> should return F<a.>, and
 again with the optionally the exact case.
@@ -1590,7 +1590,7 @@ Does not automatically flush output handles on some platforms.
 
 =item exit
 
-Emulates UNIX exit() (which considers C<exit 1> to indicate an error) by
+Emulates Unix exit() (which considers C<exit 1> to indicate an error) by
 mapping the C<1> to SS$_ABORT (C<44>).  This behavior may be overridden
 with the pragma C<use vmsish 'exit'>.  As with the CRTL's exit()
 function, C<exit 0> is also mapped to an exit status of SS$_NORMAL
@@ -1885,7 +1885,7 @@ Not implemented. (Win32, VMS, S<RISC OS>, VOS)
 =item sockatmark
 
 A relatively recent addition to socket functions, may not
-be implemented even in UNIX platforms.
+be implemented even in Unix platforms.
 
 =item socketpair
 
index 7127de0..e040f09 100644 (file)
@@ -1344,7 +1344,7 @@ otherwise stated the ARG argument is optional; in some cases, it is
 forbidden.
 
 Any pattern containing a special backtracking verb that allows an argument
-has the special behaviour that when executed it sets the current packages'
+has the special behaviour that when executed it sets the current package's
 C<$REGERROR> and C<$REGMARK> variables. When doing so the following
 rules apply:
 
index 9c54ec4..17adf78 100644 (file)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ the regex engine, or understand how the regex engine works. Readers of
 this document are expected to understand perl's regex syntax and its
 usage in detail. If you want to learn about the basics of Perl's
 regular expressions, see L<perlre>. And if you want to replace the
-regex engine with your own see see L<perlreapi>.
+regex engine with your own, see L<perlreapi>.
 
 =head1 OVERVIEW
 
@@ -222,7 +222,7 @@ always be so.
 =item *
 
 There is the "next regop" from a given regop/regnode. This is the
-regop physically located after the the current one, as determined by
+regop physically located after the current one, as determined by
 the size of the current regop. This is often useful, such as when
 dumping the structure we use this order to traverse. Sometimes the code
 assumes that the "next regnode" is the same as the "next regop", or in
@@ -624,13 +624,13 @@ interpreter.
 The two entry points are C<re_intuit_start()> and C<pregexec()>. These routines
 have a somewhat incestuous relationship with overlap between their functions,
 and C<pregexec()> may even call C<re_intuit_start()> on its own. Nevertheless
-other parts of the the perl source code may call into either, or both.
+other parts of the perl source code may call into either, or both.
 
 Execution of the interpreter itself used to be recursive, but thanks to the
 efforts of Dave Mitchell in the 5.9.x development track, that has changed: now an
 internal stack is maintained on the heap and the routine is fully
 iterative. This can make it tricky as the code is quite conservative
-about what state it stores, with the result that that two consecutive lines in the
+about what state it stores, with the result that two consecutive lines in the
 code can actually be running in totally different contexts due to the
 simulated recursion.
 
index b9be6e6..a6ad210 100644 (file)
@@ -2701,7 +2701,7 @@ the letter's counter. Then C<(*FAIL)> does what it says, and
 the regexp  engine proceeds according to the book: as long as the end of
 the string  hasn't been reached, the position is advanced before looking
 for another vowel. Thus, match or no match makes no difference, and the
-regexp engine proceeds until the the entire string has been inspected.
+regexp engine proceeds until the entire string has been inspected.
 (It's remarkable that an alternative solution using something like
 
    $count{lc($_)}++ for split('', "supercalifragilisticexpialidoceous");
index b98ab78..bc9d9bc 100644 (file)
@@ -566,7 +566,7 @@ folks use it for their backup files:
     $ perl -pi~ -e 's/foo/bar/' file1 file2 file3...
 
 Note that because B<-i> renames or deletes the original file before
-creating a new file of the same name, UNIX-style soft and hard links will
+creating a new file of the same name, Unix-style soft and hard links will
 not be preserved.
 
 Finally, the B<-i> switch does not impede execution when no
@@ -946,7 +946,7 @@ locations are automatically included if they exist (this lookup
 being done at interpreter startup time.)
 
 If PERL5LIB is not defined, PERLLIB is used.  Directories are separated
-(like in PATH) by a colon on unixish platforms and by a semicolon on
+(like in PATH) by a colon on Unixish platforms and by a semicolon on
 Windows (the proper path separator being given by the command C<perl
 -V:path_sep>).
 
@@ -978,7 +978,7 @@ layer specification strings (which is also used to decode the PERLIO
 environment variable) treats the colon as a separator.
 
 An unset or empty PERLIO is equivalent to the default set of layers for
-your platform, for example C<:unix:perlio> on UNIX-like systems
+your platform, for example C<:unix:perlio> on Unix-like systems
 and C<:unix:crlf> on Windows and other DOS-like systems.
 
 The list becomes the default for I<all> perl's IO. Consequently only built-in
@@ -1072,7 +1072,7 @@ buggy in this release.
 
 On all platforms the default set of layers should give acceptable results.
 
-For UNIX platforms that will equivalent of "unix perlio" or "stdio".
+For Unix platforms that will equivalent of "unix perlio" or "stdio".
 Configure is setup to prefer "stdio" implementation if system's library
 provides for fast access to the buffer, otherwise it uses the "unix perlio"
 implementation.
@@ -1097,7 +1097,7 @@ X<PERLIO_DEBUG>
 
 If set to the name of a file or device then certain operations of PerlIO
 sub-system will be logged to that file (opened as append). Typical uses
-are UNIX:
+are Unix:
 
    PERLIO_DEBUG=/dev/tty perl script ...
 
index 00d5e57..63dcb84 100644 (file)
@@ -366,7 +366,7 @@ threading, or for that matter, to most other threading systems out there,
 is that by default, no data is shared. When a new Perl thread is created,
 all the data associated with the current thread is copied to the new
 thread, and is subsequently private to that new thread!
-This is similar in feel to what happens when a UNIX process forks,
+This is similar in feel to what happens when a Unix process forks,
 except that in this case, the data is just copied to a different part of
 memory within the same process rather than a real fork taking place.
 
@@ -739,7 +739,7 @@ Semaphores with counters greater than one are also useful for
 establishing quotas.  Say, for example, that you have a number of
 threads that can do I/O at once.  You don't want all the threads
 reading or writing at once though, since that can potentially swamp
-your I/O channels, or deplete your process' quota of filehandles.  You
+your I/O channels, or deplete your process's quota of filehandles.  You
 can use a semaphore initialized to the number of concurrent I/O
 requests (or open files) that you want at any one time, and have your
 threads quietly block and unblock themselves.
@@ -1030,7 +1030,7 @@ changing uids and gids.
 
 Thinking of mixing C<fork()> and threads?  Please lie down and wait
 until the feeling passes.  Be aware that the semantics of C<fork()> vary
-between platforms.  For example, some UNIX systems copy all the current
+between platforms.  For example, some Unix systems copy all the current
 threads into the child process, while others only copy the thread that
 called C<fork()>. You have been warned!
 
@@ -1161,7 +1161,7 @@ Dan Sugalski E<lt>dan@sidhe.org<gt>
 
 Slightly modified by Arthur Bergman to fit the new thread model/module.
 
-Reworked slightly by Jˆrg Walter E<lt>jwalt@cpan.org<gt> to be more concise
+Reworked slightly by Jörg Walter E<lt>jwalt@cpan.org<gt> to be more concise
 about thread-safety of Perl code.
 
 Rearranged slightly by Elizabeth Mattijsen E<lt>liz@dijkmat.nl<gt> to put
index 44638a8..61a10fb 100644 (file)
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ cash.
 
 =head2 Improve the coverage of the core tests
 
-Use Devel::Cover to ascertain the core modules's test coverage, then add
+Use Devel::Cover to ascertain the core modules' test coverage, then add
 tests that are currently missing.
 
 =head2 test B
@@ -1098,7 +1098,7 @@ in fact, all of L<perlport> is.)
 This has actually already been implemented (but only for Win32),
 take a look at F<iperlsys.h> and F<win32/perlhost.h>.  While all Win32
 variants go through a set of "vtables" for operating system access,
-non-Win32 systems currently go straight for the POSIX/UNIX-style
+non-Win32 systems currently go straight for the POSIX/Unix-style
 system/library call.  Similar system as for Win32 should be
 implemented for all platforms.  The existing Win32 implementation
 probably does not need to survive alongside this proposed new
index e67ec1c..2d9b4ad 100644 (file)
@@ -218,7 +218,7 @@ for more information.
 
 =item L<prove>
 
-F<prove> is a command-line interface to the test-running functionality of
+F<prove> is a command-line interface to the test-running functionality
 of F<Test::Harness>.  It's an alternative to C<make test>.
 
 =item L<corelist>
index b25a2d7..dc56071 100644 (file)
@@ -206,12 +206,12 @@ check the appropriate DECC$ feature logical, or call a conversion
 routine to force it to that format.
 
 The feature logical name DECC$FILENAME_UNIX_REPORT modifies traditional
-Perl behavior in the conversion of file specifications from UNIX to VMS
+Perl behavior in the conversion of file specifications from Unix to VMS
 format in order to follow the extended character handling rules now
 expected by the CRTL.  Specifically, when this feature is in effect, the
-C<./.../> in a UNIX path is now translated to C<[.^.^.^.]> instead of
+C<./.../> in a Unix path is now translated to C<[.^.^.^.]> instead of
 the traditional VMS C<[...]>.  To be compatible with what MakeMaker
-expects, if a VMS path cannot be translated to a UNIX path, it is
+expects, if a VMS path cannot be translated to a Unix path, it is
 passed through unchanged, so C<unixify("[...]")> will return C<[...]>.
 
 The handling of extended characters is largely complete in the
@@ -221,24 +221,24 @@ particular, at this writing PathTools has only partial support for
 directories containing some extended characters.
 
 There are several ambiguous cases where a conversion routine cannot
-determine whether an input filename is in UNIX format or in VMS format,
-since now both VMS and UNIX file specifications may have characters in
+determine whether an input filename is in Unix format or in VMS format,
+since now both VMS and Unix file specifications may have characters in
 them that could be mistaken for syntax delimiters of the other type. So
 some pathnames simply cannot be used in a mode that allows either type
 of pathname to be present.  Perl will tend to assume that an ambiguous
-filename is in UNIX format.
+filename is in Unix format.
 
 Allowing "." as a version delimiter is simply incompatible with
-determining whether a pathname is in VMS format or in UNIX format with
+determining whether a pathname is in VMS format or in Unix format with
 extended file syntax.  There is no way to know whether "perl-5.8.6" is a
-UNIX "perl-5.8.6" or a VMS "perl-5.8;6" when passing it to unixify() or
+Unix "perl-5.8.6" or a VMS "perl-5.8;6" when passing it to unixify() or
 vmsify().
 
 The DECC$FILENAME_UNIX_REPORT logical name controls how Perl interprets
 filenames to the extent that Perl uses the CRTL internally for many
 purposes, and attempts to follow CRTL conventions for reporting
 filenames.  The DECC$FILENAME_UNIX_ONLY feature differs in that it
-expects all filenames passed to the C run-time to be already in UNIX
+expects all filenames passed to the C run-time to be already in Unix
 format.  This feature is not yet supported in Perl since Perl uses
 traditional OpenVMS file specifications internally and in the test
 harness, and it is not yet clear whether this mode will be useful or
@@ -284,7 +284,7 @@ default supports symbolic links when the requisite support is available
 in the filesystem and CRTL (generally 64-bit OpenVMS v8.3 and later). 
 There are a number of limitations and caveats to be aware of when
 working with symbolic links on VMS.  Most notably, the target of a valid
-symbolic link must be expressed as a UNIX-style path and it must exist
+symbolic link must be expressed as a Unix-style path and it must exist
 on a volume visible from your POSIX root (see the C<SHOW ROOT> command
 in DCL help).  For further details on symbolic link capabilities and
 requirements, see chapter 12 of the CRTL manual that ships with OpenVMS
@@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ lower case.
   $define DISPLAY "hostname:0.0"
 
 Currently the value of C<DISPLAY> is ignored.  It is recommended that it be set
-to be the hostname of the display, the server and screen in UNIX notation.  In
+to be the hostname of the display, the server and screen in Unix notation.  In
 the future the value of DISPLAY may be honored by Perl instead of using the
 default display.
 
@@ -680,21 +680,21 @@ SEVERE_ERROR severity for DCL error handling.
 
 When C<PERL_VMS_POSIX_EXIT> is active (see L</"$?"> below), the native VMS exit
 status value will have either one of the C<$!> or C<$?> or C<$^E> or
-the UNIX value 255 encoded into it in a way that the effective original
+the Unix value 255 encoded into it in a way that the effective original
 value can be decoded by other programs written in C, including Perl
 and the GNV package.  As per the normal non-VMS behavior of C<die> if
 either C<$!> or C<$?> are non-zero, one of those values will be
-encoded into a native VMS status value.  If both of the UNIX status
+encoded into a native VMS status value.  If both of the Unix status
 values are 0, and the C<$^E> value is set one of ERROR or SEVERE_ERROR
 severity, then the C<$^E> value will be used as the exit code as is.
-If none of the above apply, the UNIX value of 255 will be encoded into
+If none of the above apply, the Unix value of 255 will be encoded into
 a native VMS exit status value.
 
 Please note a significant difference in the behavior of C<die> in
 the C<PERL_VMS_POSIX_EXIT> mode is that it does not force a VMS
-SEVERE_ERROR status on exit.  The UNIX exit values of 2 through
+SEVERE_ERROR status on exit.  The Unix exit values of 2 through
 255 will be encoded in VMS status values with severity levels of
-SUCCESS.  The UNIX exit value of 1 will be encoded in a VMS status
+SUCCESS.  The Unix exit value of 1 will be encoded in a VMS status
 value with a severity level of ERROR.  This is to be compatible with
 how the VMS C library encodes these values.
 
@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ The minimum severity level set by C<die> in C<PERL_VMS_POSIX_EXIT> mode
 may be changed to be ERROR or higher in the future depending on the 
 results of testing and further review.
 
-See L</"$?"> for a description of the encoding of the UNIX value to
+See L</"$?"> for a description of the encoding of the Unix value to
 produce a native VMS status containing it.
 
 
@@ -1111,38 +1111,38 @@ compiled with the _POSIX_EXIT macro set, the status value will
 contain the actual value of 0 to 255 returned by that program
 on a normal exit.
 
-With the _POSIX_EXIT macro set, the UNIX exit value of zero is
-represented as a VMS native status of 1, and the UNIX values
+With the _POSIX_EXIT macro set, the Unix exit value of zero is
+represented as a VMS native status of 1, and the Unix values
 from 2 to 255 are encoded by the equation:
 
    VMS_status = 0x35a000 + (unix_value * 8) + 1.
 
-And in the special case of unix value 1 the encoding is:
+And in the special case of Unix value 1 the encoding is:
 
    VMS_status = 0x35a000 + 8 + 2 + 0x10000000.
 
 For other termination statuses, the severity portion of the
-subprocess' exit status is used: if the severity was success or
+subprocess's exit status is used: if the severity was success or
 informational, these bits are all 0; if the severity was
 warning, they contain a value of 1; if the severity was
 error or fatal error, they contain the actual severity bits,
 which turns out to be a value of 2 for error and 4 for severe_error.
 Fatal is another term for the severe_error status.
 
-As a result, C<$?> will always be zero if the subprocess' exit
+As a result, C<$?> will always be zero if the subprocess's exit
 status indicated successful completion, and non-zero if a
 warning or error occurred or a program compliant with encoding
 _POSIX_EXIT values was run and set a status.
 
 How can you tell the difference between a non-zero status that is
-the result of a VMS native error status or an encoded UNIX status?
+the result of a VMS native error status or an encoded Unix status?
 You can not unless you look at the ${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE} value.
 The ${^CHILD_ERROR_NATIVE} value returns the actual VMS status value
 and check the severity bits. If the severity bits are equal to 1,
 then if the numeric value for C<$?> is between 2 and 255 or 0, then
-C<$?> accurately reflects a value passed back from a UNIX application.
+C<$?> accurately reflects a value passed back from a Unix application.
 If C<$?> is 1, and the severity bits indicate a VMS error (2), then
-C<$?> is from a UNIX application exit value.
+C<$?> is from a Unix application exit value.
 
 In practice, Perl scripts that call programs that return _POSIX_EXIT
 type status values will be expecting those values, and programs that
@@ -1152,9 +1152,9 @@ behavior or just checking for a non-zero status.
 And success is always the value 0 in all behaviors.
 
 When the actual VMS termination status of the child is an error,
-internally the C<$!> value will be set to the closest UNIX errno
+internally the C<$!> value will be set to the closest Unix errno
 value to that error so that Perl scripts that test for error
-messages will see the expected UNIX style error message instead
+messages will see the expected Unix style error message instead
 of a VMS message.
 
 Conversely, when setting C<$?> in an END block, an attempt is made
@@ -1174,7 +1174,7 @@ status value to be passed through.  The special value of 0xFFFF is
 almost a NOOP as it will cause the current native VMS status in the
 C library to become the current native Perl VMS status, and is handled
 this way as it is known to not be a valid native VMS status value.
-It is recommend that only values in the range of normal UNIX parent or
+It is recommend that only values in the range of normal Unix parent or
 child status numbers, 0 to 255 are used.
 
 The pragma C<use vmsish 'status'> makes C<$?> reflect the actual