This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Re: Hash key created by subroutine call? (fwd)
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@engin.umich.edu>
Mon, 24 Feb 1997 22:29:30 +0000 (17:29 -0500)
committerChip Salzenberg <chip@atlantic.net>
Fri, 21 Feb 1997 14:41:53 +0000 (02:41 +1200)
On Mon, 24 Feb 1997 06:20:14 MST, Tom Christiansen wrote:
>Considering how frequently this gets asked, how about
>putting it in perlsub?
>
>------- start of forwarded message -------
>From: Rick Smith <ricks@sd.znet.com>
>Newsgroups: comp.lang.perl.misc
>Subject: Hash key created by subroutine call?
>Date: Sat, 22 Feb 1997 21:47:52 -0800

I seem to be in a documental state today.

p5p-msgid: <199702242229.RAA04395@aatma.engin.umich.edu>

pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perltrap.pod

index 347d2f8..a38d05b 100644 (file)
@@ -48,8 +48,15 @@ there's really no difference from the language's perspective.)
 Any arguments passed to the routine come in as the array @_.  Thus if you
 called a function with two arguments, those would be stored in C<$_[0]>
 and C<$_[1]>.  The array @_ is a local array, but its values are implicit
-references (predating L<perlref>) to the actual scalar parameters.  The
-return value of the subroutine is the value of the last expression
+references (predating L<perlref>) to the actual scalar parameters.  What
+this means in practice is that when you explicitly modify C<$_[0]> et al.,
+you will be changing the actual arguments.  As a result, all arguments
+to functions are treated as lvalues.  Any hash or array elements that are
+passed to functions will get created if they do not exist (irrespective
+of whether the function does modify the contents of C<@_>).  This is
+frequently a source of surprise.  See L<perltrap> for an example.
+
+The return value of the subroutine is the value of the last expression
 evaluated.  Alternatively, a return statement may be used to specify the
 returned value and exit the subroutine.  If you return one or more arrays
 and/or hashes, these will be flattened together into one large
index 05cb02b..a179b8b 100644 (file)
@@ -1137,6 +1137,26 @@ general subroutine traps.  Includes some OS-Specific traps.
 
 =over 5
 
+=item * Subroutine calls provide lvalue context to arguments
+
+Beginning with version 5.002, all subroutine arguments are consistently
+given a "value may be modified" context, since all subroutines are able
+to modify their arguments by explicitly referring to C<$_[0]> etc.
+This means that any array and hash elements provided as arguments
+will B<always be created> if they did not exist at the time
+the subroutine is called.  (perl5 versions before 5.002 used to provide
+lvalue context for the second and subsequent arguments, and perl4 did
+not provide lvalue context to subroutine arguments at all--even though
+arguments were supposedly modifiable in perl4).
+
+    sub test { $_[0] = 1; $_[1] = 2; $_[2] = 3; }
+    &test($foo{'bar'}, $bar{'foo'}, $foo[5]);
+    print join(':', %foo), '|', join(':',%bar), '|', join(':',@foo);
+    
+    # perl4          prints: ||
+    # perl5 <  5.002 prints: |foo:2|:::::3
+    # perl5 >= 5.002 prints: bar:1|foo:2|:::::3
+
 =item * (Signals)
 
 Barewords that used to look like strings to Perl will now look like subroutine