This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
perlpod.pod possible patches
authorLarry W. Virden <lvirden@cas.org>
Tue, 7 Jan 1997 12:56:30 +0000 (07:56 -0500)
committerChip Salzenberg <chip@atlantic.net>
Tue, 7 Jan 1997 23:52:00 +0000 (11:52 +1200)
I am discouraged because I have pretty much determined that a current
incompatibility between Mail::Mailer, perl 5.003_19, and perlbug has
resulted in a number of patchs and bug reports that I have sent over the
past week appear to have disappeared into a sink hole.  Anyways, I will
attempt to do this by hand.  The following is a patch to perlpod.pod to
fix some things that are not formatting properly or which appear to be
incomplete thoughts.

p5p-msgid: <9701070756.AA1185@cas.org>
Signed-off-by: x2487 <lvirden@cas.org>
pod/perlpod.pod

index 5c4466d..85bd066 100644 (file)
@@ -36,16 +36,16 @@ use however it pleases.  Currently recognized commands are
     =end X
 
 The "=pod" directive does nothing beyond telling the compiler to lay
-off of through the next "=cut".  It's useful for adding another 
+off of formatting through the next "=cut".  It's useful for adding another 
 paragraph to the doc if you're mixing up code and pod a lot.  
 
-Head1 and head2 produce first and second level headings, with the text on
-the same paragraph as "=headn" forming the heading description.
+Head1 and head2 produce first and second level headings, with the text in
+the same paragraph as the "=headn" directive forming the heading description.
 
-Item, over, and back require a little more explanation: Over starts a
-section specifically for the generation of a list using =item commands. At
-the end of your list, use =back to end it. You will probably want to give
-"4" as the number to =over, as some formatters will use this for indentation.
+Item, over, and back require a little more explanation: "=over" starts a
+section specifically for the generation of a list using "=item" commands. At
+the end of your list, use "=back" to end it. You will probably want to give
+"4" as the number to "=over", as some formatters will use this for indentation.
 This should probably be a default. Note also that there are some basic rules
 to using =item: don't use them outside of an =over/=back block, use at least
 one inside an =over/=back block, you don't _have_ to include the =back if
@@ -54,20 +54,21 @@ items consistent: either use "=item *" for all of them, to produce bullets,
 or use "=item 1.", "=item 2.", etc., to produce numbered lists, or use
 "=item foo", "=item bar", etc., i.e., things that looks nothing like bullets
 or numbers. If you start with bullets or numbers, stick with them, as many
-formatters use the first =item type to decide how to format the list.  
+formatters use the first "=item" type to decide how to format the list.  
 
-For and begin/end let you include sections that are not interpreted as pod
-text, but in a format that a particular formatter is looking for. A
-formatter that can utilize that format will use the section, otherwise it
-will be completely ignored.  "=for" specifies that the entire paragraph
-should is in the format indicated by the first word after "=for", like this:
+For, begin, and end let you include sections that are not interpreted
+as pod text, but passed directly to particular formatters. A formatter
+that can utilize that format will use the section, otherwise it will be
+completely ignored.  The directive "=for" specifies that the entire next
+paragraph is in the format indicated by the first word after
+"=for", like this:
 
  =for html <br> 
   <p> This is a raw HTML paragraph </p>
 
-The paired commands "=begin" and "=end" work very similarly to =for, but
-instead of only accepting a single paragraph, all text from =begin to a
-paragraph with a matching =end are treated as a particular format. 
+The paired commands "=begin" and "=end" work very similarly to "=for", but
+instead of only accepting a single paragraph, all text from "=begin" to a
+paragraph with a matching "=end" are treated as a particular format. 
 
 Here are some examples of how to use these:
 
@@ -92,7 +93,7 @@ Some format names that formatters currently are known to accept include
 "roff", "man", "latex", "tex", "text", and "html". (Some formatters will
 treat some of these as synonyms.)
 
-And don't forget, when using any command, that that command lasts up until
+And don't forget, when using any command, that the command lasts up until
 the end of the B<paragraph>, not the line. Hence in the examples below, you
 can see the blank lines after each command to end its paragraph.
 
@@ -141,7 +142,7 @@ here and in commands:
                    L</"sec">           ditto
     F<file>    Used for filenames
     X<index>   An index entry
-    Z<>         A zero-width character
+    ZE<lt>E<gt>        A zero-width character
     E<escape>   A named character (very similar to HTML escapes)
                    E<lt>               A literal <
                    E<gt>               A literal >
@@ -183,8 +184,8 @@ B<pod2html>, B<pod2latex>, and B<pod2fm>.
 =head1 Embedding Pods in Perl Modules
 
 You can embed pod documentation in your Perl scripts.  Start your
-documentation with a =head1 command at the beg, and end it with 
-an =cut command.  Perl will ignore the pod text.  See any of the
+documentation with a "=head1" command at the beginning, and end it with 
+an "=cut" command.  Perl will ignore the pod text.  See any of the
 supplied library modules for examples.  If you're going to put
 your pods at the end of the file, and you're using an __END__
 or __DATA__ cut mark, make sure to put a blank line there before
@@ -192,6 +193,7 @@ the first pod directive.
 
     __END__
 
+
     =head1 NAME
 
     modern - I am a modern module