This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
[PATCH] the the double double word word fix fix
authorAbhijit Menon-Sen <ams@wiw.org>
Fri, 2 Nov 2001 00:39:36 +0000 (00:39 +0000)
committerAbhijit Menon-Sen <ams@wiw.org>
Fri, 2 Nov 2001 00:39:36 +0000 (00:39 +0000)
From: Richard Soderberg <rs@oregonnet.com>
Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 13:12:03 -0800
Message-Id: <200111012112.NAA23288@oregonnet.com>

Subject: Re: [PATCH] the the double double word word fix fix
From: Mark-Jason Dominus <mjd@plover.com>
Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 16:43:40 -0500
Message-Id: <20011101214340.2044.qmail@plover.com>

Subject: Re: [PATCH] the the double double word word fix fix
From: Mark-Jason Dominus <mjd@plover.com>
Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 16:51:39 -0500
Message-Id: <20011101215139.2196.qmail@plover.com>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@12802

14 files changed:
pod/perldebtut.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlfaq3.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlintro.pod
pod/perliol.pod
pod/perlmodlib.PL
pod/perlmodstyle.pod
pod/perlpodspec.pod
pod/perlrequick.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perltoc.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perlxstut.pod

index 693e938..f9f19ac 100644 (file)
@@ -329,7 +329,7 @@ While we're here, take a closer look at the 'B<x>' command, it's really useful
 and will merrily dump out nested references, complete objects, partial objects
 - just about whatever you throw at it:
 
-Let's make a quick object and x-plode it, first we'll start the the debugger:
+Let's make a quick object and x-plode it, first we'll start the debugger:
 it wants some form of input from STDIN, so we give it something non-commital,
 a zero:
 
index 9447b42..838b545 100644 (file)
@@ -2317,7 +2317,7 @@ supplied it an uninitialized value.  See L<perlform>.
 =item Number too long
 
 (F) Perl limits the representation of decimal numbers in programs to
-about about 250 characters.  You've exceeded that length.  Future
+about 250 characters.  You've exceeded that length.  Future
 versions of Perl are likely to eliminate this arbitrary limitation.  In
 the meantime, try using scientific notation (e.g. "1e6" instead of
 "1_000_000").
index e4d03fb..c0ca0ec 100644 (file)
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ Which includes the following description:
     of a Unix shell with the power of Perl. The goal is to eventually
     have a full featured shell that behaves as expected for normal
     shell activity. But, the Perl Shell will use Perl syntax and
-    functionality for for control-flow statements and other things.
+    functionality for control-flow statements and other things.
 
 The Shell.pm module (distributed with Perl) makes Perl try commands
 which aren't part of the Perl language as shell commands.  perlsh
index 669ecf5..8ccdde8 100644 (file)
@@ -218,7 +218,7 @@ call is not necessary (see L<Reference Counts and Mortality>).
 
 Perl provides the function C<sv_chop> to efficiently remove characters
 from the beginning of a string; you give it an SV and a pointer to
-somewhere inside the the PV, and it discards everything before the
+somewhere inside the PV, and it discards everything before the
 pointer. The efficiency comes by means of a little hack: instead of
 actually removing the characters, C<sv_chop> sets the flag C<OOK>
 (offset OK) to signal to other functions that the offset hack is in
index 0d96c97..ee4a011 100644 (file)
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ Exactly like C:
     }
 
 The C style for loop is rarely needed in Perl since Perl provides
-the the more friendly list scanning C<foreach> loop.
+the more friendly list scanning C<foreach> loop.
 
 =item foreach
 
index 36f1bed..037c9f4 100644 (file)
@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ Functions to support Perl's traditional "fast" access to the buffer.
 =back
 
 A layer does not have to implement all the functions, but the whole table has
-to be present. Unimplemented slots can be NULL (which will will result in an error
+to be present. Unimplemented slots can be NULL (which will result in an error
 when called) or can be filled in with stubs to "inherit" behaviour from
 a "base class". This "inheritance" is fixed for all instances of the layer,
 but as the layer chooses which stubs to populate the table, limited
index eb419ad..5ba3592 100644 (file)
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ system B<man> command, you might try the B<perldoc> program.
 
 Extension modules are written in C (or a mix of Perl and C).  They
 are usually dynamically loaded into Perl if and when you need them,
-but may also be be linked in statically.  Supported extension modules
+but may also be linked in statically.  Supported extension modules
 include Socket, Fcntl, and POSIX.
 
 Many popular C extension modules do not come bundled (at least, not
index 4da7311..c039da7 100644 (file)
@@ -498,7 +498,7 @@ A contact email address for the author/maintainer
 The level of detail in Perl module documentation generally goes from
 less detailed to more detailed.  Your SYNOPSIS section should contain a
 minimal example of use (perhaps as little as one line of code; skip the
-unusual use cases or or anything not needed by most users); the
+unusual use cases or anything not needed by most users); the
 DESCRIPTION should describe your module in broad terms, generally in
 just a few paragraphs; more detail of the module's routines or methods,
 lengthy code examples, or other in-depth material should be given in 
index c87e1cb..5b07190 100644 (file)
@@ -1058,7 +1058,7 @@ loudly if they see "=biblio".
 
 Throughout this document, "Pod" has been the preferred spelling for
 the name of the documentation format.  One may also use "POD" or
-"pod".  For the the documentation that is (typically) in the Pod
+"pod".  For the documentation that is (typically) in the Pod
 format, you may use "pod", or "Pod", or "POD".  Understanding these
 distinctions is useful; but obsessing over how to spell them, usually
 is not.
index 5b72a35..1b483c0 100644 (file)
@@ -219,11 +219,11 @@ boundary.
 
 =head2 Matching this or that
 
-We can match match different character strings with the B<alternation>
+We can match different character strings with the B<alternation>
 metacharacter C<'|'>.  To match C<dog> or C<cat>, we form the regex
 C<dog|cat>.  As before, perl will try to match the regex at the
 earliest possible point in the string.  At each character position,
-perl will first try to match the the first alternative, C<dog>.  If
+perl will first try to match the first alternative, C<dog>.  If
 C<dog> doesn't match, perl will then try the next alternative, C<cat>.
 If C<cat> doesn't match either, then the match fails and perl moves to
 the next position in the string.  Some examples:
index 95e3f03..cc8f5c4 100644 (file)
@@ -306,7 +306,7 @@ string is the earliest point at which the regexp can match.
     /[yY][eE][sS]/;      # match 'yes' in a case-insensitive way
                          # 'yes', 'Yes', 'YES', etc.
 
-This regexp displays a common task: perform a case-insensitive
+This regexp displays a common task: perform a case-insensitive
 match.  Perl provides away of avoiding all those brackets by simply
 appending an C<'i'> to the end of the match.  Then C</[yY][eE][sS]/;>
 can be rewritten as C</yes/i;>.  The C<'i'> stands for
@@ -561,7 +561,7 @@ regexp, but sometime we want alternatives for just part of a
 regexp.  For instance, suppose we want to search for housecats or
 housekeepers.  The regexp C<housecat|housekeeper> fits the bill, but is
 inefficient because we had to type C<house> twice.  It would be nice to
-have parts of the regexp be constant, like C<house>, and and some
+have parts of the regexp be constant, like C<house>, and some
 parts have alternatives, like C<cat|keeper>.
 
 The B<grouping> metacharacters C<()> solve this problem.  Grouping
@@ -670,7 +670,7 @@ wins.  Second, we were able to get a match at the first character
 position of the string 'a'.  If there were no matches at the first
 position, perl would move to the second character position 'b' and
 attempt the match all over again.  Only when all possible paths at all
-possible character positions have been exhausted does perl give give
+possible character positions have been exhausted does perl give
 up and declare S<C<$string =~ /(abd|abc)(df|d|de)/;> > to be false.
 
 Even with all this work, regexp matching happens remarkably fast.  To
@@ -1336,7 +1336,7 @@ the regexp in the I<last successful match> is used instead.  So we have
     "dogbert =~ //;  # this matches the 'd' regexp used before
 
 The final two modifiers C<//g> and C<//c> concern multiple matches.
-The modifier C<//g> stands for global matching and allows the the
+The modifier C<//g> stands for global matching and allows the
 matching operator to match within a string as many times as possible.
 In scalar context, successive invocations against a string will have
 `C<//g> jump from match to match, keeping track of position in the
@@ -1585,7 +1585,7 @@ OK, you know the basics of regexps and you want to know more.  If
 matching regular expressions is analogous to a walk in the woods, then
 the tools discussed in Part 1 are analogous to topo maps and a
 compass, basic tools we use all the time.  Most of the tools in part 2
-are are analogous to flare guns and satellite phones.  They aren't used
+are analogous to flare guns and satellite phones.  They aren't used
 too often on a hike, but when we are stuck, they can be invaluable.
 
 What follows are the more advanced, less used, or sometimes esoteric
@@ -1766,7 +1766,7 @@ S<C<COMBINING RING> >, which translates in Danish to A with the circle
 atop it, as in the word Angstrom.  C<\X> is equivalent to C<\PM\pM*}>,
 i.e., a non-mark followed by one or more marks.
 
-For the the full and latest information about Unicode see the latest
+For the full and latest information about Unicode see the latest
 Unicode standard, or the Unicode Consortium's website http://www.unicode.org/
 
 As if all those classes weren't enough, Perl also defines POSIX style
@@ -2032,7 +2032,7 @@ Contrast that with an independent subexpression:
 The independent subexpression C<< (?>a*) >> doesn't care about the rest
 of the regexp, so it sees an C<a> and grabs it.  Then the rest of the
 regexp C<ab> cannot match.  Because C<< (?>a*) >> is independent, there
-is no backtracking and and the independent subexpression does not give
+is no backtracking and the independent subexpression does not give
 up its C<a>.  Thus the match of the regexp as a whole fails.  A similar
 behavior occurs with completely independent regexps:
 
@@ -2124,7 +2124,7 @@ conditional are not needed.
 
 Normally, regexps are a part of Perl expressions.
 S<B<Code evaluation> > expressions turn that around by allowing
-arbitrary Perl code to be a part of of a regexp.  A code evaluation
+arbitrary Perl code to be a part of a regexp.  A code evaluation
 expression is denoted C<(?{code})>, with C<code> a string of Perl
 statements.
 
index e111bb6..fef52a3 100644 (file)
@@ -9787,7 +9787,7 @@ Fixed length 32-bit encodings, Multi-byte encodings, "Escape" encodings
 =item Encoding Names
 
 The MIME name as defined in IETF RFC-XXXX, The name in the IANA registry,
-The name used by the the organization that defined it
+The name used by the organization that defined it
 
 =back
 
index 9ee1144..1898b11 100644 (file)
@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ That's to say, C<pack "(sI)40"> would be the same as C<pack "sI"x40>
 =head2 Cross compilation
 
 Make Perl buildable with a cross-compiler. This will play havoc with
-Configure, which needs to how how the target system will respond to
+Configure, which needs to know how the target system will respond to
 its tests; maybe C<microperl> will be a good starting point here.
 (Indeed, Bart Schuller reports that he compiled up C<microperl> for
 the Agenda PDA and it works fine.)  A really big spanner in the works
index ad648eb..4ce0597 100644 (file)
@@ -1186,7 +1186,7 @@ To create a reference, we use the C<newRV> function.  Note that you can
 cast an AV* or an HV* to type SV* in this case (and many others).  This
 allows you to take references to arrays, hashes and scalars with the same
 function.  Conversely, the C<SvRV> function always returns an SV*, which may
-need to be be cast to the appropriate type if it is something other than a
+need to be cast to the appropriate type if it is something other than a
 scalar (check with C<SvTYPE>).
 
 =item *