This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Add the perlperf manpage, by Richard Foley
authorRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Sun, 21 Dec 2008 09:22:27 +0000 (10:22 +0100)
committerRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Sun, 21 Dec 2008 09:22:27 +0000 (10:22 +0100)
MANIFEST
pod.lst
pod/perl.pod
pod/perlperf.pod [new file with mode: 0644]
pod/perltoc.pod
vms/descrip_mms.template
win32/pod.mak

index c89f105..8ad939a 100644 (file)
--- a/MANIFEST
+++ b/MANIFEST
@@ -1667,9 +1667,9 @@ lib/Attribute/Handlers/t/data_convert.t   Test attribute data conversion
 lib/Attribute/Handlers/t/linerep.t     See if Attribute::Handlers works
 lib/Attribute/Handlers/t/multi.t       See if Attribute::Handlers works
 lib/attributes.pm              For "sub foo : attrlist"
-lib/autodie.pm                 Functions suceed or die with lexical scope
 lib/autodie/exception.pm       Exception class for autodie
 lib/autodie/exception/system.pm Exception class for autodying system()
+lib/autodie.pm                 Functions suceed or die with lexical scope
 lib/AutoLoader.pm              Autoloader base class
 lib/AutoLoader/t/01AutoLoader.t        See if AutoLoader works
 lib/AutoLoader/t/02AutoSplit.t See if AutoSplit works
@@ -3440,6 +3440,7 @@ pod/perlopentut.pod               Perl open() tutorial
 pod/perlop.pod                 Perl operators and precedence
 pod/perlothrtut.pod            Old Perl threads tutorial
 pod/perlpacktut.pod            Perl pack() and unpack() tutorial
+pod/perlperf.pod               Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
 pod/perl.pod                   Perl overview (this section)
 pod/perlpod.pod                        Perl plain old documentation
 pod/perlpodspec.pod            Perl plain old documentation format specification
diff --git a/pod.lst b/pod.lst
index 525e340..d33c782 100644 (file)
--- a/pod.lst
+++ b/pod.lst
@@ -26,6 +26,8 @@ h Tutorials
   perltooc             Perl OO tutorial, part 2
   perlbot              Perl OO tricks and examples
 
+  perlperf             Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
+
   perlstyle            Perl style guide
 
   perlcheat            Perl cheat sheet
index 3164521..3a10eaa 100644 (file)
@@ -41,6 +41,8 @@ For ease of access, the Perl manual has been split up into several sections.
     perltooc           Perl OO tutorial, part 2
     perlbot            Perl OO tricks and examples
 
+    perlperf           Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
+
     perlstyle          Perl style guide
 
     perlcheat          Perl cheat sheet
diff --git a/pod/perlperf.pod b/pod/perlperf.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..3faf364
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,1183 @@
+=head1 NAME
+
+perlperf - Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This is an introduction to the use of performance and optimization techniques
+which can be used with particular reference to perl progams.  While many perl
+developers have come from other languages, and can use their prior knowledge
+where appropriate, there are many other people who might benefit from a few
+perl specific pointers.  If you want the condensed version, perhaps the best
+advice comes from the renowned Japanese Samurai, Miyamoto Musashi, who said:
+
+    "Do Not Engage in Useless Activity"
+
+in 1645.
+
+=head1 OVERVIEW
+
+Perhaps the most common mistake programmers make is to attempt to optimize
+their code before a program actually does anything useful - this is a bad idea.
+There's no point in having an extremely fast program that doesn't work.  The
+first job is to get a program to I<correctly> do something B<useful>, (not to
+mention ensuring the test suite is fully functional), and only then to consider
+optimizing it.  Having decided to optimize existing working code, there are
+several simple but essential steps to consider which are intrinsic to any
+optimization process.
+
+=head2 ONE STEP SIDEWAYS
+
+Firstly, you need to establish a baseline time for the existing code, which
+timing needs to be reliable and repeatable.  You'll probably want to use the
+C<Benchmark> or C<Devel::DProf> modules, or something similar, for this step,
+or perhaps the unix system C<time> utility, whichever is appropriate.  See the
+base of this document for a longer list of benchmarking and profiling modules,
+and recommended further reading.
+
+=head2 ONE STEP FORWARD
+
+Next, having examined the program for I<hot spots>, (places where the code
+seems to run slowly), change the code with the intention of making it run
+faster.  Using version control software, like C<subversion>, will ensure no
+changes are irreversible.  It's too easy to fiddle here and fiddle there -
+don't change too much at any one time or you might not discover which piece of
+code B<really> was the slow bit.
+
+=head2 ANOTHER STEP SIDEWAYS
+
+It's not enough to say: "that will make it run faster", you have to check it.
+Rerun the code under control of the benchmarking or profiling modules, from the
+first step above, and check that the new code executed the B<same task> in
+I<less time>.  Save your work and repeat...
+
+=head1 GENERAL GUIDELINES
+
+The critical thing when considering performance is to remember there is no such
+thing as a C<Golden Bullet>, which is why there are no rules, only guidelines.
+
+It is clear that inline code is going to be faster than subroutine or method
+calls, because there is less overhead, but this approach has the disadvantage
+of being less maintainable and comes at the cost of greater memory usage -
+there is no such thing as a free lunch.  If you are searching for an element in
+a list, it can be more efficient to store the data in a hash structure, and
+then simply look to see whether the key is defined, rather than to loop through
+the entire array using grep() for instance.  substr() may be (a lot) faster
+than grep() but not as flexible, so you have another trade-off to access.  Your
+code may contain a line which takes 0.01 of a second to execute which if you
+call it 1,000 times, quite likely in a program parsing even medium sized files
+for instance, you already have a 10 second delay, in just one single code
+location, and if you call that line 100,000 times, your entire program will
+slow down to an unbearable crawl.
+
+Using a subroutine as part of your sort is a powerful way to get exactly what
+you want, but will usually be slower than the built-in I<alphabetic> C<cmp> and
+I<numeric> C<E<lt>=E<gt>> sort operators.  It is possible to make multiple
+passes over your data, building indices to make the upcoming sort more
+efficient, and to use what is known as the C<OM> (Orcish Maneuver) to cache the
+sort keys in advance.  The cache lookup, while a good idea, can itself be a
+source of slowdown by enforcing a double pass over the data - once to setup the
+cache, and once to sort the data.  Using C<pack()> to extract the required sort
+key into a consistent string can be an efficient way to build a single string
+to compare, instead of using multiple sort keys, which makes it possible to use
+the standard, written in C<c> and fast, perl C<sort()> function on the output,
+and is the basis of the C<GRT> (Guttman Rossler Transform).  Some string
+combinations can slow the C<GRT> down, by just being too plain complex for it's
+own good.
+
+For applications using database backends, the standard C<DBIx> namespace has
+tries to help with keeping things nippy, not least because it tries to I<not>
+query the database until the latest possible moment, but always read the docs
+which come with your choice of libraries.  Among the many issues facing
+developers dealing with databases should remain aware of is to always use
+C<SQL> placeholders and to consider pre-fetching data sets when this might
+prove advantageous.  Splitting up a large file by assigning multiple processes
+to parsing a single file, using say C<POE>, C<threads> or C<fork> can also be a
+useful way of optimizing your usage of the available C<CPU> resources, though
+this technique is fraught with concurrency issues and demands high attention to
+detail.
+
+Every case has a specific application and one or more exceptions, and there is
+no replacement for running a few tests and finding out which method works best
+for your particular environment, this is why writing optimal code is not an
+exact science, and why we love using Perl so much - TMTOWTDI.
+
+=head1 BENCHMARKS
+
+Here are a few examples to demonstrate usage of Perl's benchmarking tools.
+
+=head2  Assigning and Dereferencing Variables.
+
+I'm sure most of us have seen code which looks like, (or worse than), this:
+
+    if ( $obj->{_ref}->{_myscore} >= $obj->{_ref}->{_yourscore} ) {
+        ...
+
+This sort of code can be a real eyesore to read, as well as being very
+sensitive to typos, and it's much clearer to dereference the variable
+explicitly.  We're side-stepping the issue of working with object-oriented
+programming techniques to encapsulate variable access via methods, only
+accessible through an object.  Here we're just discussing the technical
+implementation of choice, and whether this has an effect on performance.  We
+can see whether this dereferencing operation, has any overhead by putting
+comparative code in a file and running a C<Benchmark> test.
+
+# dereference
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    use Benchmark;
+
+    my $ref = {
+            'ref'   => {
+                _myscore    => '100 + 1',
+                _yourscore  => '102 - 1',
+            },
+    };
+
+    timethese(1000000, {
+            'direct'       => sub {
+                my $x = $ref->{ref}->{_myscore} . $ref->{ref}->{_yourscore} ;
+            },
+            'dereference'  => sub {
+                my $ref  = $ref->{ref};
+                my $myscore = $ref->{_myscore};
+                my $yourscore = $ref->{_yourscore};
+                my $x = $myscore . $yourscore;
+            },
+    });
+
+It's essential to run any timing measurements a sufficient number of times so
+the numbers settle on a numerical average, otherwise each run will naturally
+fluctuate due to variations in the environment, to reduce the effect of
+contention for C<CPU> resources and network bandwidth for instance.  Running
+the above code for one million iterations, we can take a look at the report
+output by the C<Benchmark> module, to see which approach is the most effective.
+
+    $> perl dereference
+
+    Benchmark: timing 1000000 iterations of dereference, direct...
+    dereference:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.59 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.59 CPU) @ 628930.82/s (n=1000000)
+        direct:  1 wallclock secs ( 1.20 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.20 CPU) @ 833333.33/s (n=1000000)
+
+The difference is clear to see and the dereferencing approach is slower.  While
+it managed to execute an average of 628,930 times a second during our test, the
+direct approach managed to run an additional 204,403 times, unfortunately.
+Unfortunately, because there are many examples of code written using the
+multiple layer direct variable access, and it's usually horrible.  It is,
+however, miniscully faster.  The question remains whether the minute gain is
+actually worth the eyestrain, or the loss of maintainability.
+
+=head2  Search and replace or tr
+
+If we have a string which needs to be modified, while a regex will almost
+always be much more flexible, C<tr>, an oft underused tool, can still be a
+useful.  One scenario might be replace all vowels with another character.  The
+regex solution might look like this:
+
+    $str =~ s/[aeiou]/x/g
+
+The C<tr> alternative might look like this:
+
+    $str =~ tr/aeiou/xxxxx/
+
+We can put that into a test file which we can run to check which approach is
+the fastest, using a global C<$STR> variable to assign to the C<my $str>
+variable so as to avoid perl trying to optimize any of the work away by
+noticing it's assigned only the once.
+
+# regex-transliterate
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    use Benchmark;
+
+    my $STR = "$$-this and that";
+
+    timethese( 1000000, {
+            'sr'  => sub { my $str = $STR; $str =~ s/[aeiou]/x/g; return $str; },
+            'tr'  => sub { my $str = $STR; $str =~ tr/aeiou/xxxxx/; return $str; },
+    });
+
+Running the code gives us our results:
+
+    $> perl regex-transliterate
+
+    Benchmark: timing 1000000 iterations of sr, tr...
+            sr:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.19 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.19 CPU) @ 840336.13/s (n=1000000)
+            tr:  0 wallclock secs ( 0.49 usr +  0.00 sys =  0.49 CPU) @ 2040816.33/s (n=1000000)
+
+The C<tr> version is a clear winner.  One solution is flexible, the other is
+fast - and it's appropriately the programmers choice which to use in the
+circumstances.
+
+Check the C<Benchmark> docs for further useful techniques.
+
+=head1 PROFILING TOOLS
+
+A slightly larger piece of code will provide something on which a profiler can
+produce more extensive reporting statistics.  This example uses the simplistic
+C<wordmatch> program which parses a given input file and spews out a short
+report on the contents.
+
+# wordmatch
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    =head1 NAME
+
+    filewords - word analysis of input file
+
+    =head1 SYNOPSIS
+
+        filewords -f inputfilename [-d]
+
+    =head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+    This program parses the given filename, specified with C<-f>, and displays a
+    simple analysis of the words found therein.  Use the C<-d> switch to enable
+    debugging messages.
+
+    =cut
+
+    use FileHandle;
+    use Getopt::Long;
+
+    my $debug   =  0;
+    my $file    = '';
+
+    my $result = GetOptions (
+        'debug'         => \$debug,
+        'file=s'        => \$file,
+    );
+    die("invalid args") unless $result;
+
+    unless ( -f $file ) {
+        die("Usage: $0 -f filename [-d]");
+    }
+    my $FH = FileHandle->new("< $file") or die("unable to open file($file): $!");
+
+    my $i_LINES = 0;
+    my $i_WORDS = 0;
+    my %count   = ();
+
+    my @lines = <$FH>;
+    foreach my $line ( @lines ) {
+        $i_LINES++;
+        $line =~ s/\n//;
+        my @words = split(/ +/, $line);
+        my $i_words = scalar(@words);
+        $i_WORDS = $i_WORDS + $i_words;
+        debug("line: $i_LINES supplying $i_words words: @words");
+        my $i_word = 0;
+        foreach my $word ( @words ) {
+            $i_word++;
+            $count{$i_LINES}{spec} += matches($i_word, $word, '[^a-zA-Z0-9]');
+            $count{$i_LINES}{only} += matches($i_word, $word, '^[^a-zA-Z0-9]+$');
+            $count{$i_LINES}{cons} += matches($i_word, $word, '^[(?i:bcdfghjklmnpqrstvwxyz)]+$');
+            $count{$i_LINES}{vows} += matches($i_word, $word, '^[(?i:aeiou)]+$');
+            $count{$i_LINES}{caps} += matches($i_word, $word, '^[(A-Z)]+$');
+        }
+    }
+
+    print report( %count );
+
+    sub matches {
+        my $i_wd  = shift;
+        my $word  = shift;
+        my $regex = shift;
+        my $has = 0;
+
+        if ( $word =~ /($regex)/ ) {
+            $has++ if $1;
+        }
+
+        debug("word: $i_wd ".($has ? 'matches' : 'does not match')." chars: /$regex/");
+
+        return $has;
+    }
+
+    sub report {
+        my %report = @_;
+        my %rep;
+
+        foreach my $line ( keys %report ) {
+            foreach my $key ( keys %{ $report{$line} } ) {
+                $rep{$key} += $report{$line}{$key};
+            }
+        }
+
+        my $report = qq|
+    $0 report for $file:
+    lines in file: $i_LINES
+    words in file: $i_WORDS
+    words with special (non-word) characters: $i_spec
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: $i_only
+    words with only consonants: $i_cons
+    words with only capital letters: $i_caps
+    words with only vowels: $i_vows
+    |;
+
+        return $report;
+    }
+
+    sub debug {
+        my $message = shift;
+
+        if ( $debug ) {
+            print STDERR "DBG: $message\n";
+        }
+    }
+
+    exit 0;
+
+=head2 Devel::DProf
+
+This venerable module has been the de-facto standard for Perl code profiling
+for more than a decade, but has been replaced by a number of other modules
+which have brought us back to the 21st century.  Although you're recommended to
+evaluate your tool from the several mentioned here and from the CPAN list at
+the base of this document, (and currently L<Devel::NYTProf> seems to be the
+weapon of choice - see below), we'll take a quick look at the output from
+L<Devel::DProf> first, to set a baseline for Perl profiling tools.  Run the
+above program under the control of C<Devel::DProf> by using the C<-d> switch on
+the command-line.
+
+    $> perl -d:DProf wordmatch -f perl5db.pl
+
+    <...multiple lines snipped...>
+
+    wordmatch report for perl5db.pl:
+    lines in file: 9428
+    words in file: 50243
+    words with special (non-word) characters: 20480
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: 7790
+    words with only consonants: 4801
+    words with only capital letters: 1316
+    words with only vowels: 1701
+
+C<Devel::DProf> produces a special file, called F<tmon.out> by default, and
+this file is read by the C<dprofpp> program, which is already installed as part
+of the C<Devel::DProf> distribution.  If you call C<dprofpp> with no options,
+it will read the F<tmon.out> file in the current directory and produce a human
+readable statistics report of the run of your program.  Note that this may take
+a little time.
+
+    $> dprofpp
+
+    Total Elapsed Time = 2.951677 Seconds
+      User+System Time = 2.871677 Seconds
+    Exclusive Times
+    %Time ExclSec CumulS #Calls sec/call Csec/c  Name
+     102.   2.945  3.003 251215   0.0000 0.0000  main::matches
+     2.40   0.069  0.069 260643   0.0000 0.0000  main::debug
+     1.74   0.050  0.050      1   0.0500 0.0500  main::report
+     1.04   0.030  0.049      4   0.0075 0.0123  main::BEGIN
+     0.35   0.010  0.010      3   0.0033 0.0033  Exporter::as_heavy
+     0.35   0.010  0.010      7   0.0014 0.0014  IO::File::BEGIN
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Getopt::Long::FindOption
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Symbol::BEGIN
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Fcntl::BEGIN
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Fcntl::bootstrap
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  warnings::BEGIN
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  IO::bootstrap
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Getopt::Long::ConfigDefaults
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Getopt::Long::Configure
+     0.00       - -0.000      1        -      -  Symbol::gensym
+
+C<dprofpp> will produce some quite detailed reporting on the activity of the
+C<wordmatch> program.  The wallclock, user and system, times are at the top of
+the analysis, and after this are the main columns defining which define the
+report.  Check the C<dprofpp> docs for details of the many options it supports.
+
+See also C<Apache::DProf> which hooks C<Devel::DProf> into C<mod_perl>.
+
+=head2 Devel::Profiler
+
+Let's take a look at the same program using a different profiler:
+C<Devel::Profiler>, a drop-in Perl-only replacement for C<Devel::DProf>.  The
+usage is very slightly different in that instead of using the special C<-d:>
+flag, you pull C<Devel::Profiler> in directly as a module using C<-M>.
+
+    $> perl -MDevel::Profiler wordmatch -f perl5db.pl
+
+    <...multiple lines snipped...>
+
+    wordmatch report for perl5db.pl:
+    lines in file: 9428
+    words in file: 50243
+    words with special (non-word) characters: 20480
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: 7790
+    words with only consonants: 4801
+    words with only capital letters: 1316
+    words with only vowels: 1701
+
+
+C<Devel::Profiler> generates a tmon.out file which is compatible with the
+C<dprofpp> program, thus saving the construction of a dedicated statistics
+reader program.  C<dprofpp> usage is therefore identical to the above example.
+
+    $> dprofpp
+
+    Total Elapsed Time =   20.984 Seconds
+      User+System Time =   19.981 Seconds
+    Exclusive Times
+    %Time ExclSec CumulS #Calls sec/call Csec/c  Name
+     49.0   9.792 14.509 251215   0.0000 0.0001  main::matches
+     24.4   4.887  4.887 260643   0.0000 0.0000  main::debug
+     0.25   0.049  0.049      1   0.0490 0.0490  main::report
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  Getopt::Long::GetOptions
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      2   0.0000 0.0000  Getopt::Long::ParseOptionSpec
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  Getopt::Long::FindOption
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  IO::File::new
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  IO::Handle::new
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  Symbol::gensym
+     0.00   0.000  0.000      1   0.0000 0.0000  IO::File::open
+
+Interestingly we get slightly different results, which is mostly because the
+algorithm which generates the report is different, even though the output file
+format was allegedly identical.  The elapsed, user and system times are clearly
+showing the time it took for C<Devel::Profiler> to execute it's own run, but
+the column listings feel more accurate somehow than the ones we had earlier
+from C<Devel::DProf>.  The 102% figure has disappeared, for example.  This is
+where we have to use the tools at our disposal, and recognise their pros and
+cons, before using them.  Interestingly, the numbers of calls for each
+subroutine are identical in the two reports, it's the percentages which differ.
+As the author of C<Devel::Proviler> writes:
+
+    ...running HTML::Template's test suite under Devel::DProf shows output()
+    taking NO time but Devel::Profiler shows around 10% of the time is in output().
+    I don't know which to trust but my gut tells me something is wrong with
+    Devel::DProf.  HTML::Template::output() is a big routine that's called for
+    every test. Either way, something needs fixing.
+
+YMMV.
+
+See also C<Devel::Apache::Profiler> which hooks C<Devel::Profiler> into C<mod_perl>.
+
+=head2 Devel::SmallProf
+
+The C<Devel::SmallProf> profiler examines the runtime of your Perl program and
+produces a line-by-line listing to show how many times each line was called,
+and how long each line took to execute.  It is called by supplying the familiar
+C<-d> flag to Perl at runtime.
+
+    $> perl -d:SmallProf wordmatch -f perl5db.pl
+
+    <...multiple lines snipped...>
+
+    wordmatch report for perl5db.pl:
+    lines in file: 9428
+    words in file: 50243
+    words with special (non-word) characters: 20480
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: 7790
+    words with only consonants: 4801
+    words with only capital letters: 1316
+    words with only vowels: 1701
+
+C<Devel::SmallProf> writes it's output into a file called F<smallprof.out>, by
+default.  The format of the file looks like this:
+
+    <num> <time> <ctime> <line>:<text>
+
+When the program has terminated, the output may be examined and sorted using
+any standard text filtering utilities.  Something like the following may be
+sufficient:
+
+    $> cat smallprof.out | grep \d*: | sort -k3 | tac | head -n20
+
+    251215   1.65674   7.68000    75: if ( $word =~ /($regex)/ ) {
+    251215   0.03264   4.40000    79: debug("word: $i_wd ".($has ? 'matches' :
+    251215   0.02693   4.10000    81: return $has;
+    260643   0.02841   4.07000   128: if ( $debug ) {
+    260643   0.02601   4.04000   126: my $message = shift;
+    251215   0.02641   3.91000    73: my $has = 0;
+    251215   0.03311   3.71000    70: my $i_wd  = shift;
+    251215   0.02699   3.69000    72: my $regex = shift;
+    251215   0.02766   3.68000    71: my $word  = shift;
+     50243   0.59726   1.00000    59:  $count{$i_LINES}{cons} =
+     50243   0.48175   0.92000    61:  $count{$i_LINES}{spec} =
+     50243   0.00644   0.89000    56:  my $i_cons = matches($i_word, $word,
+     50243   0.48837   0.88000    63:  $count{$i_LINES}{caps} =
+     50243   0.00516   0.88000    58:  my $i_caps = matches($i_word, $word, '^[(A-
+     50243   0.00631   0.81000    54:  my $i_spec = matches($i_word, $word, '[^a-
+     50243   0.00496   0.80000    57:  my $i_vows = matches($i_word, $word,
+     50243   0.00688   0.80000    53:  $i_word++;
+     50243   0.48469   0.79000    62:  $count{$i_LINES}{only} =
+     50243   0.48928   0.77000    60:  $count{$i_LINES}{vows} =
+     50243   0.00683   0.75000    55:  my $i_only = matches($i_word, $word, '^[^a-
+
+You can immediately see a slightly different focus to the subroutine profiling
+modules, and we start to see exactly which line of code is taking the most
+time.  That regex line is looking a bit suspicious, for example.  Remember that
+these tools are supposed to be used together, there is no single best way to
+profile your code, you need to use the best tools for the job.
+
+See also C<Apache::SmallProf> which hooks C<Devel::SmallProf> into C<mod_perl>.
+
+=head2 Devel::FastProf
+
+C<Devel::FastProf> is another Perl line profiler.  This was written with a view
+to getting a faster line profiler, than is possible with for example
+C<Devel::SmallProf>, because it's written in C<C>.  To use C<Devel::FastProf>,
+supply the C<-d> argument to Perl:
+
+    $> perl -d:FastProf wordmatch -f perl5db.pl
+
+    <...multiple lines snipped...>
+
+    wordmatch report for perl5db.pl:
+    lines in file: 9428
+    words in file: 50243
+    words with special (non-word) characters: 20480
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: 7790
+    words with only consonants: 4801
+    words with only capital letters: 1316
+    words with only vowels: 1701
+
+C<Devel::FastProf> writes statistics to the file F<fastprof.out> in the current
+directory.  The output file, which can be specified, can be interpreted by using
+the C<fprofpp> command-line program.
+
+    $> fprofpp | head -n20
+
+    # fprofpp output format is:
+    # filename:line time count: source
+    wordmatch:75 3.93338 251215: if ( $word =~ /($regex)/ ) {
+    wordmatch:79 1.77774 251215: debug("word: $i_wd ".($has ? 'matches' : 'does not match')." chars: /$regex/");
+    wordmatch:81 1.47604 251215: return $has;
+    wordmatch:126 1.43441 260643: my $message = shift;
+    wordmatch:128 1.42156 260643: if ( $debug ) {
+    wordmatch:70 1.36824 251215: my $i_wd  = shift;
+    wordmatch:71 1.36739 251215: my $word  = shift;
+    wordmatch:72 1.35939 251215: my $regex = shift;
+
+Straightaway we can see that the number of times each line has been called is
+identical to the C<Devel::SmallProf> output, and the sequence is only very
+slightly different based on the ordering of the amount of time each line took
+to execute, C<if ( $debug ) { > and C<my $message = shift;>, for example.  The
+differences in the actual times recorded might be in the algorithm used
+internally, or it could be due to system resource limitations or contention.
+
+See also the L<DBIx::Profiler> which will profile database queries running
+under the C<DBIx::*> namespace.
+
+=head2 Devel::NYTProf
+
+C<Devel::NYTProf> is the B<next generation> of Perl code profiler, fixing many
+shortcomings in other tools and implementing many cool features.  First of all it
+can be used as either a I<line> profiler, a I<block> or a I<subroutine>
+profiler, all at once.  It can also use sub-microsecond (100ns) resolution on
+systems which provide C<clock_gettime()>.  It can be started and stopped even
+by the program being profiled.  It's a one-line entry to profile C<mod_perl>
+applications.  It's written in C<c> and is probably the fastest profiler
+available for Perl.  The list of coolness just goes on.  Enough of that, let's
+see how to it works - just use the familiar C<-d> switch to plug it in and run
+the code.
+
+    $> perl -d:NYTProf wordmatch -f perl5db.pl
+
+    wordmatch report for perl5db.pl:
+    lines in file: 9427
+    words in file: 50243
+    words with special (non-word) characters: 20480
+    words with only special (non-word) characters: 7790
+    words with only consonants: 4801
+    words with only capital letters: 1316
+    words with only vowels: 1701
+
+C<NYTProf> will generate a report database into the file F<nytprof.out> by
+default.  Human readable reports can be generated from here by using the
+supplied C<nytprofhtml> (HTML output) and C<nytprofcsv> (CSV output) programs.
+We've used the unix sytem C<html2text> utility to convert the
+F<nytprof/index.html> file for convenience here.
+
+    $> html2text nytprof/index.html
+
+    Performance Profile Index
+    For wordmatch
+      Run on Fri Sep 26 13:46:39 2008
+    Reported on Fri Sep 26 13:47:23 2008
+
+             Top 15 Subroutines -- ordered by exclusive time
+    |Calls |P |F |Inclusive|Exclusive|Subroutine                          |
+    |      |  |  |Time     |Time     |                                    |
+    |251215|5 |1 |13.09263 |10.47692 |main::              |matches        |
+    |260642|2 |1 |2.71199  |2.71199  |main::              |debug          |
+    |1     |1 |1 |0.21404  |0.21404  |main::              |report         |
+    |2     |2 |2 |0.00511  |0.00511  |XSLoader::          |load (xsub)    |
+    |14    |14|7 |0.00304  |0.00298  |Exporter::          |import         |
+    |3     |1 |1 |0.00265  |0.00254  |Exporter::          |as_heavy       |
+    |10    |10|4 |0.00140  |0.00140  |vars::              |import         |
+    |13    |13|1 |0.00129  |0.00109  |constant::          |import         |
+    |1     |1 |1 |0.00360  |0.00096  |FileHandle::        |import         |
+    |3     |3 |3 |0.00086  |0.00074  |warnings::register::|import         |
+    |9     |3 |1 |0.00036  |0.00036  |strict::            |bits           |
+    |13    |13|13|0.00032  |0.00029  |strict::            |import         |
+    |2     |2 |2 |0.00020  |0.00020  |warnings::          |import         |
+    |2     |1 |1 |0.00020  |0.00020  |Getopt::Long::      |ParseOptionSpec|
+    |7     |7 |6 |0.00043  |0.00020  |strict::            |unimport       |
+
+    For more information see the full list of 189 subroutines.
+
+The first part of the report already shows the critical information regarding
+which subroutines are using the most time.  The next gives some statistics
+about the source files profiled.
+
+            Source Code Files -- ordered by exclusive time then name
+    |Stmts  |Exclusive|Avg.   |Reports                     |Source File         |
+    |       |Time     |       |                            |                    |
+    |2699761|15.66654 |6e-06  |line   .    block   .    sub|wordmatch           |
+    |35     |0.02187  |0.00062|line   .    block   .    sub|IO/Handle.pm        |
+    |274    |0.01525  |0.00006|line   .    block   .    sub|Getopt/Long.pm      |
+    |20     |0.00585  |0.00029|line   .    block   .    sub|Fcntl.pm            |
+    |128    |0.00340  |0.00003|line   .    block   .    sub|Exporter/Heavy.pm   |
+    |42     |0.00332  |0.00008|line   .    block   .    sub|IO/File.pm          |
+    |261    |0.00308  |0.00001|line   .    block   .    sub|Exporter.pm         |
+    |323    |0.00248  |8e-06  |line   .    block   .    sub|constant.pm         |
+    |12     |0.00246  |0.00021|line   .    block   .    sub|File/Spec/Unix.pm   |
+    |191    |0.00240  |0.00001|line   .    block   .    sub|vars.pm             |
+    |77     |0.00201  |0.00003|line   .    block   .    sub|FileHandle.pm       |
+    |12     |0.00198  |0.00016|line   .    block   .    sub|Carp.pm             |
+    |14     |0.00175  |0.00013|line   .    block   .    sub|Symbol.pm           |
+    |15     |0.00130  |0.00009|line   .    block   .    sub|IO.pm               |
+    |22     |0.00120  |0.00005|line   .    block   .    sub|IO/Seekable.pm      |
+    |198    |0.00085  |4e-06  |line   .    block   .    sub|warnings/register.pm|
+    |114    |0.00080  |7e-06  |line   .    block   .    sub|strict.pm           |
+    |47     |0.00068  |0.00001|line   .    block   .    sub|warnings.pm         |
+    |27     |0.00054  |0.00002|line   .    block   .    sub|overload.pm         |
+    |9      |0.00047  |0.00005|line   .    block   .    sub|SelectSaver.pm      |
+    |13     |0.00045  |0.00003|line   .    block   .    sub|File/Spec.pm        |
+    |2701595|15.73869 |       |Total                       |
+    |128647 |0.74946  |       |Average                     |
+    |       |0.00201  |0.00003|Median                      |
+    |       |0.00121  |0.00003|Deviation                   |
+
+    Report produced by the NYTProf 2.03 Perl profiler, developed by Tim Bunce and
+    Adam Kaplan.
+
+At this point, if you're using the I<html> report, you can click through the
+various links to bore down into each subroutine and each line of code.  Because
+we're using the text reporting here, and there's a whole directory full of
+reports built for each source file, we'll just display a part of the
+corresponding F<wordmatch-line.html> file, sufficient to give an idea of the
+sort of output you can expect from this cool tool.
+
+    $> html2text nytprof/wordmatch-line.html
+
+    Performance Profile -- -block view-.-line view-.-sub view-
+    For wordmatch
+    Run on Fri Sep 26 13:46:39 2008
+    Reported on Fri Sep 26 13:47:22 2008
+
+    File wordmatch
+
+     Subroutines -- ordered by exclusive time
+    |Calls |P|F|Inclusive|Exclusive|Subroutine    |
+    |      | | |Time     |Time     |              |
+    |251215|5|1|13.09263 |10.47692 |main::|matches|
+    |260642|2|1|2.71199  |2.71199  |main::|debug  |
+    |1     |1|1|0.21404  |0.21404  |main::|report |
+    |0     |0|0|0        |0        |main::|BEGIN  |
+
+
+    |Line|Stmts.|Exclusive|Avg.   |Code                                           |
+    |    |      |Time     |       |                                               |
+    |1   |      |         |       |#!/usr/bin/perl                                |
+    |2   |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |    |      |         |       |use strict;                                    |
+    |3   |3     |0.00086  |0.00029|# spent 0.00003s making 1 calls to strict::    |
+    |    |      |         |       |import                                         |
+    |    |      |         |       |use warnings;                                  |
+    |4   |3     |0.01563  |0.00521|# spent 0.00012s making 1 calls to warnings::  |
+    |    |      |         |       |import                                         |
+    |5   |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |6   |      |         |       |=head1 NAME                                    |
+    |7   |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |8   |      |         |       |filewords - word analysis of input file        |
+    <...snip...>
+    |62  |1     |0.00445  |0.00445|print report( %count );                        |
+    |    |      |         |       |# spent 0.21404s making 1 calls to main::report|
+    |63  |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |    |      |         |       |# spent 23.56955s (10.47692+2.61571) within    |
+    |    |      |         |       |main::matches which was called 251215 times,   |
+    |    |      |         |       |avg 0.00005s/call: # 50243 times               |
+    |    |      |         |       |(2.12134+0.51939s) at line 57 of wordmatch, avg|
+    |    |      |         |       |0.00005s/call # 50243 times (2.17735+0.54550s) |
+    |64  |      |         |       |at line 56 of wordmatch, avg 0.00005s/call #   |
+    |    |      |         |       |50243 times (2.10992+0.51797s) at line 58 of   |
+    |    |      |         |       |wordmatch, avg 0.00005s/call # 50243 times     |
+    |    |      |         |       |(2.12696+0.51598s) at line 55 of wordmatch, avg|
+    |    |      |         |       |0.00005s/call # 50243 times (1.94134+0.51687s) |
+    |    |      |         |       |at line 54 of wordmatch, avg 0.00005s/call     |
+    |    |      |         |       |sub matches {                                  |
+    <...snip...>
+    |102 |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |    |      |         |       |# spent 2.71199s within main::debug which was  |
+    |    |      |         |       |called 260642 times, avg 0.00001s/call: #      |
+    |    |      |         |       |251215 times (2.61571+0s) by main::matches at  |
+    |103 |      |         |       |line 74 of wordmatch, avg 0.00001s/call # 9427 |
+    |    |      |         |       |times (0.09628+0s) at line 50 of wordmatch, avg|
+    |    |      |         |       |0.00001s/call                                  |
+    |    |      |         |       |sub debug {                                    |
+    |104 |260642|0.58496  |2e-06  |my $message = shift;                           |
+    |105 |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |106 |260642|1.09917  |4e-06  |if ( $debug ) {                                |
+    |107 |      |         |       |print STDERR "DBG: $message\n";                |
+    |108 |      |         |       |}                                              |
+    |109 |      |         |       |}                                              |
+    |110 |      |         |       |                                               |
+    |111 |1     |0.01501  |0.01501|exit 0;                                        |
+    |112 |      |         |       |                                               |
+
+Oodles of very useful information in there - this seems to be the way forward.
+
+See also C<Devel::NYTProf::Apache> which hooks C<Devel::NYTProf> into C<mod_perl>.
+
+=head1  SORTING
+
+Perl modules are not the only tools a performance analyst has at their
+disposal, system tools like C<time> should not be overlooked as the next
+example shows, where we take a quick look at sorting.  Many books, theses and
+articles, have been written about efficient sorting algorithms, and this is not
+the place to repeat such work, there's several good sorting modules which
+deserve taking a look at too: C<Sort::Maker>, C<Sort::Key> spring to mind.
+However, it's still possible to make some observations on certain Perl specific
+interpretations on issues relating to sorting data sets and give an example or
+two with regard to how sorting large data volumes can effect performance.
+Firstly, an often overlooked point when sorting large amounts of data, one can
+attempt to reduce the data set to be dealt with and in many cases C<grep()> can
+be quite useful as a simple filter:
+
+    @data = sort grep { /$filter/ } @incoming
+
+A command such as this can vastly reduce the volume of material to actually
+sort through in the first place, and should not be too lightly disregarded
+purely on the basis of it's simplicity.  The C<KISS> principle is too often
+overlooked - the next example uses the simple system C<time> utility to
+demonstrate.  Let's take a look at an actual example of sorting the contents of
+a large file, an apache logfile would do.  This one has over a quarter of a
+million lines, is 50M in size, and a snippet of it looks like this:
+
+# logfile
+
+    188.209-65-87.adsl-dyn.isp.belgacom.be - - [08/Feb/2007:12:57:16 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1" 404 209 "-" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    188.209-65-87.adsl-dyn.isp.belgacom.be - - [08/Feb/2007:12:57:16 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1" 404 209 "-" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    151.56.71.198 - - [08/Feb/2007:12:57:41 +0000] "GET /suse-on-vaio.html HTTP/1.1" 200 2858 "http://www.linux-on-laptops.com/sony.html" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.2; en-US; rv:1.8.1.1) Gecko/20061204 Firefox/2.0.0.1"
+    151.56.71.198 - - [08/Feb/2007:12:57:42 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.1" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net/suse-on-vaio.html" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.2; en-US; rv:1.8.1.1) Gecko/20061204 Firefox/2.0.0.1"
+    151.56.71.198 - - [08/Feb/2007:12:57:43 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1" 404 209 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.2; en-US; rv:1.8.1.1) Gecko/20061204 Firefox/2.0.0.1"
+    217.113.68.60 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:02:15 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 304 - "-" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    217.113.68.60 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:02:16 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.1" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net/" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    debora.to.isac.cnr.it - - [08/Feb/2007:13:03:58 +0000] "GET /suse-on-vaio.html HTTP/1.1" 200 2858 "http://www.linux-on-laptops.com/sony.html" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Konqueror/3.4; Linux) KHTML/3.4.0 (like Gecko)"
+    debora.to.isac.cnr.it - - [08/Feb/2007:13:03:58 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.1" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net/suse-on-vaio.html" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Konqueror/3.4; Linux) KHTML/3.4.0 (like Gecko)"
+    debora.to.isac.cnr.it - - [08/Feb/2007:13:03:58 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.1" 404 209 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; Konqueror/3.4; Linux) KHTML/3.4.0 (like Gecko)"
+    195.24.196.99 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:26:48 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.0" 200 3309 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; fr; rv:1.8.0.9) Gecko/20061206 Firefox/1.5.0.9"
+    195.24.196.99 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:26:58 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.0" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net/" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; fr; rv:1.8.0.9) Gecko/20061206 Firefox/1.5.0.9"
+    195.24.196.99 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:26:59 +0000] "GET /favicon.ico HTTP/1.0" 404 209 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (Windows; U; Windows NT 5.1; fr; rv:1.8.0.9) Gecko/20061206 Firefox/1.5.0.9"
+    crawl1.cosmixcorp.com - - [08/Feb/2007:13:27:57 +0000] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/1.0" 200 179 "-" "voyager/1.0"
+    crawl1.cosmixcorp.com - - [08/Feb/2007:13:28:25 +0000] "GET /links.html HTTP/1.0" 200 3413 "-" "voyager/1.0"
+    fhm226.internetdsl.tpnet.pl - - [08/Feb/2007:13:37:32 +0000] "GET /suse-on-vaio.html HTTP/1.1" 200 2858 "http://www.linux-on-laptops.com/sony.html" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    fhm226.internetdsl.tpnet.pl - - [08/Feb/2007:13:37:34 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.1" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net/suse-on-vaio.html" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
+    80.247.140.134 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:57:35 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 3309 "-" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; .NET CLR 1.1.4322)"
+    80.247.140.134 - - [08/Feb/2007:13:57:37 +0000] "GET /data/css HTTP/1.1" 404 206 "http://www.rfi.net" "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; .NET CLR 1.1.4322)"
+    pop.compuscan.co.za - - [08/Feb/2007:14:10:43 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 3309 "-" "www.clamav.net"
+    livebot-207-46-98-57.search.live.com - - [08/Feb/2007:14:12:04 +0000] "GET /robots.txt HTTP/1.0" 200 179 "-" "msnbot/1.0 (+http://search.msn.com/msnbot.htm)"
+    livebot-207-46-98-57.search.live.com - - [08/Feb/2007:14:12:04 +0000] "GET /html/oracle.html HTTP/1.0" 404 214 "-" "msnbot/1.0 (+http://search.msn.com/msnbot.htm)"
+    dslb-088-064-005-154.pools.arcor-ip.net - - [08/Feb/2007:14:12:15 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 3309 "-" "www.clamav.net"
+    196.201.92.41 - - [08/Feb/2007:14:15:01 +0000] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 3309 "-" "MOT-L7/08.B7.DCR MIB/2.2.1 Profile/MIDP-2.0 Configuration/CLDC-1.1"
+
+The specific task here is to sort the 286,525 lines of this file by Response
+Code, Query, Browser, Referring Url, and lastly Date.  One solution might be to
+use the following code, which iterates over the files given on the
+command-line.
+
+# sort-apache-log
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl -n
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    my @data;
+
+    LINE:
+    while ( <> ) {
+        my $line = $_;
+        if (
+            $line =~ m/^(
+                ([\w\.\-]+)             # client
+                \s*-\s*-\s*\[
+                ([^]]+)                 # date
+                \]\s*"\w+\s*
+                (\S+)                   # query
+                [^"]+"\s*
+                (\d+)                   # status
+                \s+\S+\s+"[^"]*"\s+"
+                ([^"]*)                 # browser
+                "
+                .*
+            )$/x
+        ) {
+            my @chunks = split(/ +/, $line);
+            my $ip      = $1;
+            my $date    = $2;
+            my $query   = $3;
+            my $status  = $4;
+            my $browser = $5;
+
+            push(@data, [$ip, $date, $query, $status, $browser, $line]);
+        }
+    }
+
+    my @sorted = sort {
+        $a->[3] cmp $b->[3]
+                ||
+        $a->[2] cmp $b->[2]
+                ||
+        $a->[0] cmp $b->[0]
+                ||
+        $a->[1] cmp $b->[1]
+                ||
+        $a->[4] cmp $b->[4]
+    } @data;
+
+    foreach my $data ( @sorted ) {
+        print $data->[5];
+    }
+
+    exit 0;
+
+When running this program, redirect C<STDOUT> so it is possible to check the
+output is correct from following test runs and use the system C<time> utility
+to check the overall runtime.
+
+    $> time ./sort-apache-log logfile > out-sort
+
+    real    0m17.371s
+    user    0m15.757s
+    sys     0m0.592s
+
+The program took just over 17 wallclock seconds to run.  Note the different
+values C<time> outputs, it's important to always use the same one, and to not
+confuse what each one means.
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Elapsed Real Time
+
+The overall, or wallclock, time between when C<time> was called, and when it
+terminates.  The elapsed time includes both user and system times, and time
+spent waiting for other users and processes on the system.  Inevitably, this is
+the most approximate of the measurements given.
+
+=item User CPU Time
+
+The user time is the amount of time the entire process spent on behalf of the
+user on this system executing this program.
+
+=item System CPU Time
+
+The system time is the amount of time the kernel itself spent executing
+routines, or system calls, on behalf of this process user.
+
+=back
+
+Running this same process as a C<Schwarzian Transform> it is possible to
+eliminate the input and output arrays for storing all the data, and work on the
+input directly as it arrives too.  Otherwise, the code looks fairly similar:
+
+# sort-apache-log-schwarzian
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl -n
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    print
+
+        map $_->[0] =>
+
+        sort {
+            $a->[4] cmp $b->[4]
+                    ||
+            $a->[3] cmp $b->[3]
+                    ||
+            $a->[1] cmp $b->[1]
+                    ||
+            $a->[2] cmp $b->[2]
+                    ||
+            $a->[5] cmp $b->[5]
+        }
+        map  [ $_, m/^(
+            ([\w\.\-]+)             # client
+            \s*-\s*-\s*\[
+            ([^]]+)                 # date
+            \]\s*"\w+\s*
+            (\S+)                   # query
+            [^"]+"\s*
+            (\d+)                   # status
+            \s+\S+\s+"[^"]*"\s+"
+            ([^"]*)                 # browser
+            "
+            .*
+        )$/xo ]
+
+        => <>;
+
+    exit 0;
+
+Run the new code against the same logfile, as above, to check the new time.
+
+    $> time ./sort-apache-log-schwarzian logfile > out-schwarz
+
+    real    0m9.664s
+    user    0m8.873s
+    sys     0m0.704s
+
+The time has been cut in half, which is a respectable speed improvement by any
+standard.  Naturally, it is important to check the output is consistent with
+the first program run, this is where the unix system C<cksum> utility comes in.
+
+    $> cksum out-sort out-schwarz
+    3044173777 52029194 out-sort
+    3044173777 52029194 out-schwarz
+
+BTW. Beware too of pressure from managers who see you speed a program up by 50%
+of the runtime once, only to get a request one month later to do the same again
+(true story) - you'll just have to point out your only human, even if you are a
+Perl programmer, and you'll see what you can do...
+
+=head1 LOGGING
+
+An essential part of any good development process is appropriate error handling
+with appropriately informative messages, however there exists a school of
+thought which suggests that log files should be I<chatty>, as if the chain of
+unbroken output somehow ensures the survival of the program.  If speed is in
+any way an issue, this approach is wrong.
+
+A common sight is code which looks something like this:
+
+    logger->debug( "A logging message via process-id: $$ INC: " . Dumper(\%INC) )
+
+The problem is that this code will always be parsed and executed, even when the
+debug level set in the logging configuration file is zero.  Once the debug()
+subroutine has been entered, and the internal C<$debug> variable confirmed to
+be zero, for example, the message which has been sent in will be discarded and
+the program will continue.  In the example given though, the \%INC hash will
+already have been dumped, and the message string constructed, all of which work
+could be bypassed by a debug variable at the statement level, like this:
+
+    logger->debug( "A logging message via process-id: $$ INC: " . Dumper(\%INC) ) if $DEBUG;
+
+This effect can be demonstrated by setting up a test script with both forms,
+including a C<debug()> subroutine to emulate typical C<logger()> functionality.
+
+# ifdebug
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    use Benchmark;
+    use Data::Dumper;
+    my $DEBUG = 0;
+
+    sub debug {
+        my $msg = shift;
+
+        if ( $DEBUG ) {
+            print "DEBUG: $msg\n";
+        }
+    };
+
+    timethese(100000, {
+            'debug'       => sub {
+                debug( "A $0 logging message via process-id: $$" . Dumper(\%INC) )
+            },
+            'ifdebug'  => sub {
+                debug( "A $0 logging message via process-id: $$" . Dumper(\%INC) ) if $DEBUG
+            },
+    });
+
+Let's see what C<Benchmark> makes of this:
+
+    $> perl ifdebug
+    Benchmark: timing 100000 iterations of constant, sub...
+       ifdebug:  0 wallclock secs ( 0.01 usr +  0.00 sys =  0.01 CPU) @ 10000000.00/s (n=100000)
+                (warning: too few iterations for a reliable count)
+         debug: 14 wallclock secs (13.18 usr +  0.04 sys = 13.22 CPU) @ 7564.30/s (n=100000)
+
+In the one case the code, which does exactly the same thing as far as
+outputting any debugging information is concerned, in other words nothing,
+takes 14 seconds, and in the other case the code takes one hundredth of a
+second.  Looks fairly definitive.  Use a C<$DEBUG> variable BEFORE you call the
+subroutine, rather than relying on the smart functionality inside it.
+
+=head2  Logging if DEBUG (constant)
+
+It's possible to take the previous idea a little further, by using a compile
+time C<DEBUG> constant.
+
+# ifdebug-constant
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl
+
+    use strict;
+    use warnings;
+
+    use Benchmark;
+    use Data::Dumper;
+    use constant
+        DEBUG => 0
+    ;
+
+    sub debug {
+        if ( DEBUG ) {
+            my $msg = shift;
+            print "DEBUG: $msg\n";
+        }
+    };
+
+    timethese(100000, {
+            'debug'       => sub {
+                debug( "A $0 logging message via process-id: $$" . Dumper(\%INC) )
+            },
+            'constant'  => sub {
+                debug( "A $0 logging message via process-id: $$" . Dumper(\%INC) ) if DEBUG
+            },
+    });
+
+Running this program produces the following output:
+
+    $> perl ifdebug-constant
+    Benchmark: timing 100000 iterations of constant, sub...
+      constant:  0 wallclock secs (-0.00 usr +  0.00 sys = -0.00 CPU) @ -7205759403792793600000.00/s (n=100000)
+                (warning: too few iterations for a reliable count)
+           sub: 14 wallclock secs (13.09 usr +  0.00 sys = 13.09 CPU) @ 7639.42/s (n=100000)
+
+The C<DEBUG> constant wipes the floor with even the C<$debug> variable,
+clocking in at minus zero seconds, and generates a "warning: too few iterations
+for a reliable count" message into the bargain.  To see what is really going
+on, and why we had too few iterations when we thought we asked for 100000, we
+can use the very useful C<B::Deparse> to inspect the new code:
+
+    $> perl -MO=Deparse ifdebug-constant
+
+    use Benchmark;
+    use Data::Dumper;
+    use constant ('DEBUG', 0);
+    sub debug {
+        use warnings;
+        use strict 'refs';
+        0;
+    }
+    use warnings;
+    use strict 'refs';
+    timethese(100000, {'sub', sub {
+        debug "A $0 logging message via process-id: $$" . Dumper(\%INC);
+    }
+    , 'constant', sub {
+        0;
+    }
+    });
+    ifdebug-constant syntax OK
+
+The output shows the constant() subroutine we're testing being replaced with
+the value of the C<DEBUG> constant: zero.  The line to be tested has been
+completely optimized away, and you can't get much more efficient than that.
+
+=head1 POSTSCRIPT
+
+This document has provided several way to go about identifying hot-spots, and
+checking whether any modifications have improved the runtime of the code.
+
+As a final thought, remember that it's not (at the time of writing) possible to
+produce a useful program which will run in zero or negative time and this basic
+principle can be written as: I<useful programs are slow> by their very
+definition.  It is of course possible to write a nearly instantaneous program,
+but it's not going to do very much, here's a very efficient one:
+
+    $> perl -e 0
+
+Optimizing that any further is a job for C<p5p>.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+Further reading can be found using the modules and links below.
+
+=head2 PERLDOCS
+
+For example: perldoc -f sort
+
+    L<perlfaq4>
+    L<perlfork>
+    L<perlfunc>
+    L<perlretut>
+    L<perlthrtut>
+    L<threads>
+
+=head2 MAN PAGES
+
+    L<time>
+
+=head2 MODULES
+
+It's not possible to individually showcase all the performance related code for
+Perl here, naturally, but here's a short list of modules from the CPAN which
+deserve further attention.
+
+    L<Apache::DProf>
+    L<Apache::SmallProf>
+    L<Benchmark>
+    L<DBIx::Profiler>
+    L<Devel::AutoProfiler>
+    L<Devel::DProf>
+    L<Devel::DProfLB>
+    L<Devel::FastProf>
+    L<Devel::GraphVizProf>
+    L<Devel::NYTProf>
+    L<Devel::NYTProf::Apache>
+    L<Devel::Profiler>
+    L<Devel::Profile>
+    L<Devel::Profit>
+    L<Devel::SmallProf>
+    L<Devel::WxProf>
+    L<POE::Devel::Profiler>
+    L<Sort::Key>
+    L<Sort::Maker>
+
+=head2 URLS
+
+Very useful online reference material:
+
+    http://www.ccl4.org/~nick/P/Fast_Enough/
+
+    http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-optperl.html
+
+    http://perlbuzz.com/2007/11/bind-output-variables-in-dbi-for-speed-and-safety.html
+
+    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Performance_analysis
+
+    http://apache.perl.org/docs/1.0/guide/performance.html
+
+    http://perlgolf.sourceforge.net/
+
+    http://www.sysarch.com/Perl/sort_paper.html
+
+    http://www.unix.org.ua/orelly/perl/prog/ch08_03.htm
+
+=head1 AUTHOR
+
+Richard Foley <richard.foley@rfi.net> Copyright (c) 2008
+
+=cut
index 0cc6f25..1d57ee1 100644 (file)
@@ -653,6 +653,84 @@ X<record> X<structure> X<struct>
 
 =back
 
+=head2 perlperf - Perl Performance and Optimization Techniques
+
+=over 4
+
+=item DESCRIPTION
+
+=item OVERVIEW
+
+=over 4
+
+=item ONE STEP SIDEWAYS
+
+=item ONE STEP FORWARD
+
+=item ANOTHER STEP SIDEWAYS
+
+=back
+
+=item GENERAL GUIDELINES
+
+=item BENCHMARKS
+
+=over 4
+
+=item  Assigning and Dereferencing Variables.
+
+=item  Search and replace or tr
+
+=back
+
+=item PROFILING TOOLS
+
+=over 4
+
+=item Devel::DProf
+
+=item Devel::Profiler
+
+=item Devel::SmallProf
+
+=item Devel::FastProf
+
+=item Devel::NYTProf
+
+=back
+
+=item  SORTING
+
+Elapsed Real Time, User CPU Time, System CPU Time
+
+=item LOGGING
+
+=over 4
+
+=item  Logging if DEBUG (constant)
+
+=back
+
+=item POSTSCRIPT
+
+=item SEE ALSO
+
+=over 4
+
+=item PERLDOCS
+
+=item MAN PAGES
+
+=item MODULES
+
+=item URLS
+
+=back
+
+=item AUTHOR
+
+=back
+
 =head2 perlstyle - Perl style guide
 
 =over 4
index 26e775b..773225f 100644 (file)
@@ -406,15 +406,15 @@ pod16 = [.lib.pods]perllinux.pod [.lib.pods]perllocale.pod [.lib.pods]perllol.po
 pod17 = [.lib.pods]perlmacosx.pod [.lib.pods]perlmint.pod [.lib.pods]perlmod.pod [.lib.pods]perlmodinstall.pod [.lib.pods]perlmodlib.pod
 pod18 = [.lib.pods]perlmodstyle.pod [.lib.pods]perlmpeix.pod [.lib.pods]perlnetware.pod [.lib.pods]perlnewmod.pod [.lib.pods]perlnumber.pod
 pod19 = [.lib.pods]perlobj.pod [.lib.pods]perlop.pod [.lib.pods]perlopenbsd.pod [.lib.pods]perlopentut.pod [.lib.pods]perlos2.pod [.lib.pods]perlos390.pod
-pod20 = [.lib.pods]perlos400.pod [.lib.pods]perlothrtut.pod [.lib.pods]perlpacktut.pod [.lib.pods]perlplan9.pod [.lib.pods]perlpod.pod
-pod21 = [.lib.pods]perlpodspec.pod [.lib.pods]perlport.pod [.lib.pods]perlpragma.pod [.lib.pods]perlqnx.pod [.lib.pods]perlre.pod [.lib.pods]perlreapi.pod
-pod22 = [.lib.pods]perlrebackslash.pod [.lib.pods]perlrecharclass.pod [.lib.pods]perlref.pod [.lib.pods]perlreftut.pod [.lib.pods]perlreguts.pod
-pod23 = [.lib.pods]perlrepository.pod [.lib.pods]perlrequick.pod [.lib.pods]perlreref.pod [.lib.pods]perlretut.pod [.lib.pods]perlriscos.pod
-pod24 = [.lib.pods]perlrun.pod [.lib.pods]perlsec.pod [.lib.pods]perlsolaris.pod [.lib.pods]perlstyle.pod [.lib.pods]perlsub.pod [.lib.pods]perlsymbian.pod
-pod25 = [.lib.pods]perlsyn.pod [.lib.pods]perlthrtut.pod [.lib.pods]perltie.pod [.lib.pods]perltoc.pod [.lib.pods]perltodo.pod [.lib.pods]perltooc.pod
-pod26 = [.lib.pods]perltoot.pod [.lib.pods]perltrap.pod [.lib.pods]perltru64.pod [.lib.pods]perltw.pod [.lib.pods]perlunicode.pod [.lib.pods]perlunifaq.pod
-pod27 = [.lib.pods]perluniintro.pod [.lib.pods]perlunitut.pod [.lib.pods]perlutil.pod [.lib.pods]perluts.pod [.lib.pods]perlvar.pod [.lib.pods]perlvmesa.pod
-pod28 = [.lib.pods]perlvms.pod [.lib.pods]perlvos.pod [.lib.pods]perlwin32.pod [.lib.pods]perlxs.pod [.lib.pods]perlxstut.pod
+pod20 = [.lib.pods]perlos400.pod [.lib.pods]perlothrtut.pod [.lib.pods]perlpacktut.pod [.lib.pods]perlperf.pod [.lib.pods]perlplan9.pod
+pod21 = [.lib.pods]perlpod.pod [.lib.pods]perlpodspec.pod [.lib.pods]perlport.pod [.lib.pods]perlpragma.pod [.lib.pods]perlqnx.pod [.lib.pods]perlre.pod
+pod22 = [.lib.pods]perlreapi.pod [.lib.pods]perlrebackslash.pod [.lib.pods]perlrecharclass.pod [.lib.pods]perlref.pod [.lib.pods]perlreftut.pod
+pod23 = [.lib.pods]perlreguts.pod [.lib.pods]perlrepository.pod [.lib.pods]perlrequick.pod [.lib.pods]perlreref.pod [.lib.pods]perlretut.pod
+pod24 = [.lib.pods]perlriscos.pod [.lib.pods]perlrun.pod [.lib.pods]perlsec.pod [.lib.pods]perlsolaris.pod [.lib.pods]perlstyle.pod [.lib.pods]perlsub.pod
+pod25 = [.lib.pods]perlsymbian.pod [.lib.pods]perlsyn.pod [.lib.pods]perlthrtut.pod [.lib.pods]perltie.pod [.lib.pods]perltoc.pod [.lib.pods]perltodo.pod
+pod26 = [.lib.pods]perltooc.pod [.lib.pods]perltoot.pod [.lib.pods]perltrap.pod [.lib.pods]perltru64.pod [.lib.pods]perltw.pod [.lib.pods]perlunicode.pod
+pod27 = [.lib.pods]perlunifaq.pod [.lib.pods]perluniintro.pod [.lib.pods]perlunitut.pod [.lib.pods]perlutil.pod [.lib.pods]perluts.pod [.lib.pods]perlvar.pod
+pod28 = [.lib.pods]perlvmesa.pod [.lib.pods]perlvms.pod [.lib.pods]perlvos.pod [.lib.pods]perlwin32.pod [.lib.pods]perlxs.pod [.lib.pods]perlxstut.pod
 pod = $(pod0) $(pod1) $(pod2) $(pod3) $(pod4) $(pod5) $(pod6) $(pod7) $(pod8) $(pod9) $(pod10) $(pod11) $(pod12) $(pod13) $(pod14) $(pod15) $(pod16) $(pod17) $(pod18) $(pod19) $(pod20) $(pod21) $(pod22) $(pod23) $(pod24) $(pod25) $(pod26) $(pod27) $(pod28)
 
 # Would be useful to automate the generation of this rule from pod/buildtoc
@@ -1170,6 +1170,10 @@ makeppport : $(MINIPERL_EXE) $(ARCHDIR)Config.pm
        @ If F$Search("[.lib]pods.dir").eqs."" Then Create/Directory [.lib.pods]
        Copy/NoConfirm/Log $(MMS$SOURCE) [.lib.pods]
 
+[.lib.pods]perlperf.pod : [.pod]perlperf.pod
+       @ If F$Search("[.lib]pods.dir").eqs."" Then Create/Directory [.lib.pods]
+       Copy/NoConfirm/Log $(MMS$SOURCE) [.lib.pods]
+
 [.lib.pods]perlplan9.pod : [.pod]perlplan9.pod
        @ If F$Search("[.lib]pods.dir").eqs."" Then Create/Directory [.lib.pods]
        Copy/NoConfirm/Log $(MMS$SOURCE) [.lib.pods]
index 5862ec4..29330a1 100644 (file)
@@ -100,6 +100,7 @@ POD = \
        perlopentut.pod \
        perlothrtut.pod \
        perlpacktut.pod \
+       perlperf.pod    \
        perlpod.pod     \
        perlpodspec.pod \
        perlport.pod    \
@@ -222,6 +223,7 @@ MAN = \
        perlopentut.man \
        perlothrtut.man \
        perlpacktut.man \
+       perlperf.man    \
        perlpod.man     \
        perlpodspec.man \
        perlport.man    \
@@ -344,6 +346,7 @@ HTML = \
        perlopentut.html        \
        perlothrtut.html        \
        perlpacktut.html        \
+       perlperf.html   \
        perlpod.html    \
        perlpodspec.html        \
        perlport.html   \
@@ -466,6 +469,7 @@ TEX = \
        perlopentut.tex \
        perlothrtut.tex \
        perlpacktut.tex \
+       perlperf.tex    \
        perlpod.tex     \
        perlpodspec.tex \
        perlport.tex    \