This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Fix links to POD sections
authorFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:33:38 +0000 (09:33 -0800)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sat, 12 Feb 2011 17:50:53 +0000 (09:50 -0800)
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perlretut.pod

index 7a9efa4..28fc3ad 100644 (file)
@@ -1128,7 +1128,7 @@ voluminous output, one must not only have some idea about how regular
 expression matching works in general, but also know how Perl's regular
 expressions are internally compiled into an automaton. These matters
 are explored in some detail in
-L<perldebguts/"Debugging regular expressions">.
+L<perldebguts/"Debugging Regular Expressions">.
 
 =head1 Debugging memory usage
 X<memory usage>
@@ -1136,7 +1136,7 @@ X<memory usage>
 Perl contains internal support for reporting its own memory usage,
 but this is a fairly advanced concept that requires some understanding
 of how memory allocation works.
-See L<perldebguts/"Debugging Perl memory usage"> for the details.
+See L<perldebguts/"Debugging Perl Memory Usage"> for the details.
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
index e401bac..293683c 100644 (file)
@@ -2838,7 +2838,7 @@ Each step is of the form S<C<< n <x> <y> >>>, with C<< <x> >> the
 part of the string matched and C<< <y> >> the part not yet
 matched.  The S<C<< |  1:  STAR >>> says that Perl is at line number 1
 n the compilation list above.  See
-L<perldebguts/"Debugging regular expressions"> for much more detail.
+L<perldebguts/"Debugging Regular Expressions"> for much more detail.
 
 An alternative method of debugging regexps is to embed C<print>
 statements within the regexp.  This provides a blow-by-blow account of