This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Remove Mac OS Classic docs from DirHandle and File::{Copy,DosGlob,Find}
authorNicholas Clark <nick@ccl4.org>
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:08:11 +0000 (13:08 +0000)
committerNicholas Clark <nick@ccl4.org>
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 13:08:11 +0000 (13:08 +0000)
The documentation for the different behaviour on Mac OS Classic was not
removed when the relevant code was removed in 862f843bac3434c2. That commit
also remove all callers to several Mac OS classic support functions, but not
the functions themselves. Rectify this.

lib/DirHandle.pm
lib/File/Copy.pm
lib/File/DosGlob.pm
lib/File/Find.pm

index fc27dfb..7493c00 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 package DirHandle;
 
-our $VERSION = '1.03';
+our $VERSION = '1.04';
 
 =head1 NAME 
 
@@ -25,20 +25,6 @@ opendir(), closedir(), readdir(), and rewinddir() functions.
 The only objective benefit to using C<DirHandle> is that it avoids
 namespace pollution by creating globs to hold directory handles.
 
-=head1 NOTES
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-On Mac OS (Classic), the path separator is ':', not '/', and the 
-current directory is denoted as ':', not '.'. You should be careful 
-about specifying relative pathnames. While a full path always begins 
-with a volume name, a relative pathname should always begin with a 
-':'.  If specifying a volume name only, a trailing ':' is required.
-
-=back
-
 =cut
 
 require 5.000;
index 0f17e2b..1cf084b 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ sub syscopy;
 sub cp;
 sub mv;
 
-$VERSION = '2.20';
+$VERSION = '2.21';
 
 require Exporter;
 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
@@ -529,9 +529,6 @@ VMS systems, this calls the C<rmscopy> routine (see below).  For OS/2
 systems, this calls the C<syscopy> XSUB directly. For Win32 systems,
 this calls C<Win32::CopyFile>.
 
-On Mac OS (Classic), C<syscopy> calls C<Mac::MoreFiles::FSpFileCopy>,
-if available.
-
 B<Special behaviour if C<syscopy> is defined (OS/2, VMS and Win32)>:
 
 If both arguments to C<copy> are not file handles,
@@ -590,34 +587,6 @@ it sets C<$!>, deletes the output file, and returns 0.
 All functions return 1 on success, 0 on failure.
 $! will be set if an error was encountered.
 
-=head1 NOTES
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-On Mac OS (Classic), the path separator is ':', not '/', and the 
-current directory is denoted as ':', not '.'. You should be careful 
-about specifying relative pathnames. While a full path always begins 
-with a volume name, a relative pathname should always begin with a 
-':'.  If specifying a volume name only, a trailing ':' is required.
-
-E.g.
-
-  copy("file1", "tmp");        # creates the file 'tmp' in the current directory
-  copy("file1", ":tmp:");      # creates :tmp:file1
-  copy("file1", ":tmp");       # same as above
-  copy("file1", "tmp");        # same as above, if 'tmp' is a directory (but don't do
-                               # that, since it may cause confusion, see example #1)
-  copy("file1", "tmp:file1");  # error, since 'tmp:' is not a volume
-  copy("file1", ":tmp:file1"); # ok, partial path
-  copy("file1", "DataHD:");    # creates DataHD:file1
-
-  move("MacintoshHD:fileA", "DataHD:fileB"); # moves (doesn't copy) files from one
-                                             # volume to another
-
-=back
-
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
 File::Copy was written by Aaron Sherman I<E<lt>ajs@ajs.comE<gt>> in 1995,
index 29d2efc..90434fd 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@
 
 package File::DosGlob;
 
-our $VERSION = '1.03';
+our $VERSION = '1.04';
 use strict;
 use warnings;
 
@@ -99,173 +99,6 @@ sub doglob {
     return @retval;
 }
 
-
-#
-# Do DOS-like globbing on Mac OS 
-#
-sub doglob_Mac {
-    my $cond = shift;
-    my @retval = ();
-
-       #print "doglob_Mac: ", join('|', @_), "\n";
-  OUTER:
-    for my $arg (@_) {
-        local $_ = $arg;
-       my @matched = ();
-       my @globdirs = ();
-       my $head = ':';
-       my $not_esc_head = $head;
-       my $sepchr = ':';       
-       next OUTER unless defined $_ and $_ ne '';
-       # if arg is within quotes strip em and do no globbing
-       if (/^"(.*)"\z/s) {
-           $_ = $1;
-               # $_ may contain escaped metachars '\*', '\?' and '\'
-               my $not_esc_arg = $_;
-               $not_esc_arg =~ s/\\([*?\\])/$1/g;
-           if ($cond eq 'd') { push(@retval, $not_esc_arg) if -d $not_esc_arg }
-           else              { push(@retval, $not_esc_arg) if -e $not_esc_arg }
-           next OUTER;
-       }
-
-       if (m|^(.*?)(:+)([^:]*)\z|s) { # note: $1 is not greedy
-           my $tail;
-           ($head, $sepchr, $tail) = ($1,$2,$3);
-           #print "div: |$head|$sepchr|$tail|\n";
-           push (@retval, $_), next OUTER if $tail eq '';              
-               #
-               # $head may contain escaped metachars '\*' and '\?'
-               
-               my $tmp_head = $head;
-               # if a '*' or '?' is preceded by an odd count of '\', temporary delete 
-               # it (and its preceding backslashes), i.e. don't treat '\*' and '\?' as 
-               # wildcards
-               $tmp_head =~ s/(\\*)([*?])/$2 x ((length($1) + 1) % 2)/eg;
-       
-               if ($tmp_head =~ /[*?]/) { # if there are wildcards ... 
-               @globdirs = doglob_Mac('d', $head);
-               push(@retval, doglob_Mac($cond, map {"$_$sepchr$tail"} @globdirs)),
-                   next OUTER if @globdirs;
-           }
-               
-               $head .= $sepchr; 
-               $not_esc_head = $head;
-               # unescape $head for file operations
-               $not_esc_head =~ s/\\([*?\\])/$1/g;
-           $_ = $tail;
-       }
-       #
-       # If file component has no wildcards, we can avoid opendir
-       
-       my $tmp_tail = $_;
-       # if a '*' or '?' is preceded by an odd count of '\', temporary delete 
-       # it (and its preceding backslashes), i.e. don't treat '\*' and '\?' as 
-       # wildcards
-       $tmp_tail =~ s/(\\*)([*?])/$2 x ((length($1) + 1) % 2)/eg;
-       
-       unless ($tmp_tail =~ /[*?]/) { # if there are wildcards ...
-           $not_esc_head = $head = '' if $head eq ':';
-           my $not_esc_tail = $_;
-           # unescape $head and $tail for file operations
-           $not_esc_tail =~ s/\\([*?\\])/$1/g;
-           $head .= $_;
-               $not_esc_head .= $not_esc_tail;
-           if ($cond eq 'd') { push(@retval,$head) if -d $not_esc_head }
-           else              { push(@retval,$head) if -e $not_esc_head }
-           next OUTER;
-       }
-       #print "opendir($not_esc_head)\n";
-       opendir(D, $not_esc_head) or next OUTER;
-       my @leaves = readdir D;
-       closedir D;
-
-       # escape regex metachars but not '\' and glob chars '*', '?'
-       $_ =~ s:([].+^\-\${}[|]):\\$1:g;
-       # and convert DOS-style wildcards to regex,
-       # but only if they are not escaped
-       $_ =~ s/(\\*)([*?])/$1 . ('.' x ((length($1) + 1) % 2)) . $2/eg;
-
-       #print "regex: '$_', head: '$head', unescaped head: '$not_esc_head'\n";
-       my $matchsub = eval 'sub { $_[0] =~ m|^' . $_ . '\\z|ios }';
-       warn($@), next OUTER if $@;
-      INNER:
-       for my $e (@leaves) {
-           next INNER if $e eq '.' or $e eq '..';
-           next INNER if $cond eq 'd' and ! -d "$not_esc_head$e";
-               
-               if (&$matchsub($e)) {
-                       my $leave = (($not_esc_head eq ':') && (-f "$not_esc_head$e")) ? 
-                               "$e" : "$not_esc_head$e";
-                       #
-                       # On Mac OS, the two glob metachars '*' and '?' and the escape 
-                       # char '\' are valid characters for file and directory names. 
-                       # We have to escape and treat them specially.
-                       $leave =~ s|([*?\\])|\\$1|g;            
-                       push(@matched, $leave);
-                       next INNER;
-               }
-       }
-       push @retval, @matched if @matched;
-    }
-    return @retval;
-}
-
-#
-# _expand_volume() will only be used on Mac OS (Classic): 
-# Takes an array of original patterns as argument and returns an array of  
-# possibly modified patterns. Each original pattern is processed like 
-# that:
-# + If there's a volume name in the pattern, we push a separate pattern 
-#   for each mounted volume that matches (with '*', '?' and '\' escaped).  
-# + If there's no volume name in the original pattern, it is pushed 
-#   unchanged. 
-# Note that the returned array of patterns may be empty.
-#  
-sub _expand_volume {
-       
-       require MacPerl; # to be verbose
-       
-       my @pat = @_;
-       my @new_pat = ();
-       my @FSSpec_Vols = MacPerl::Volumes();
-       my @mounted_volumes = ();
-
-       foreach my $spec_vol (@FSSpec_Vols) {           
-               # push all mounted volumes into array
-       push @mounted_volumes, MacPerl::MakePath($spec_vol);
-       }
-       #print "mounted volumes: |@mounted_volumes|\n";
-       
-       while (@pat) {
-               my $pat = shift @pat;   
-               if ($pat =~ /^([^:]+:)(.*)\z/) { # match a volume name?
-                       my $vol_pat = $1;
-                       my $tail = $2;
-                       #
-                       # escape regex metachars but not '\' and glob chars '*', '?'
-                       $vol_pat =~ s:([].+^\-\${}[|]):\\$1:g;
-                       # and convert DOS-style wildcards to regex,
-                       # but only if they are not escaped
-                       $vol_pat =~ s/(\\*)([*?])/$1 . ('.' x ((length($1) + 1) % 2)) . $2/eg;
-                       #print "volume regex: '$vol_pat' \n";
-                               
-                       foreach my $volume (@mounted_volumes) {
-                               if ($volume =~ m|^$vol_pat\z|ios) {
-                                       #
-                                       # On Mac OS, the two glob metachars '*' and '?' and the  
-                                       # escape char '\' are valid characters for volume names. 
-                                       # We have to escape and treat them specially.
-                                       $volume =~ s|([*?\\])|\\$1|g;
-                                       push @new_pat, $volume . $tail;
-                               }
-                       }                       
-               } else { # no volume name in pattern, push original pattern
-                       push @new_pat, $pat;
-               }
-       }
-       return @new_pat;
-}
-
 #
 # this can be used to override CORE::glob in a specific
 # package by saying C<use File::DosGlob 'glob';> in that
@@ -425,61 +258,6 @@ of the quoting rules used.
 
 Extending it to csh patterns is left as an exercise to the reader.
 
-=head1 NOTES
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-Mac OS (Classic) users should note a few differences. The specification 
-of pathnames in glob patterns adheres to the usual Mac OS conventions: 
-The path separator is a colon ':', not a slash '/' or backslash '\'. A 
-full path always begins with a volume name. A relative pathname on Mac 
-OS must always begin with a ':', except when specifying a file or 
-directory name in the current working directory, where the leading colon 
-is optional. If specifying a volume name only, a trailing ':' is 
-required. Due to these rules, a glob like E<lt>*:E<gt> will find all 
-mounted volumes, while a glob like E<lt>*E<gt> or E<lt>:*E<gt> will find 
-all files and directories in the current directory.
-
-Note that updirs in the glob pattern are resolved before the matching begins,
-i.e. a pattern like "*HD:t?p::a*" will be matched as "*HD:a*". Note also,
-that a single trailing ':' in the pattern is ignored (unless it's a volume
-name pattern like "*HD:"), i.e. a glob like <:*:> will find both directories 
-I<and> files (and not, as one might expect, only directories). 
-
-The metachars '*', '?' and the escape char '\' are valid characters in 
-volume, directory and file names on Mac OS. Hence, if you want to match
-a '*', '?' or '\' literally, you have to escape these characters. Due to 
-perl's quoting rules, things may get a bit complicated, when you want to 
-match a string like '\*' literally, or when you want to match '\' literally, 
-but treat the immediately following character '*' as metachar. So, here's a 
-rule of thumb (applies to both single- and double-quoted strings): escape 
-each '*' or '?' or '\' with a backslash, if you want to treat them literally, 
-and then double each backslash and your are done. E.g. 
-
-- Match '\*' literally
-
-   escape both '\' and '*'  : '\\\*'
-   double the backslashes   : '\\\\\\*'
-
-(Internally, the glob routine sees a '\\\*', which means that both '\' and 
-'*' are escaped.)
-
-
-- Match '\' literally, treat '*' as metachar
-
-   escape '\' but not '*'   : '\\*'
-   double the backslashes   : '\\\\*'
-
-(Internally, the glob routine sees a '\\*', which means that '\' is escaped and 
-'*' is not.)
-
-Note that you also have to quote literal spaces in the glob pattern, as described
-above.
-
-=back
-
 =head1 EXPORTS (by request only)
 
 glob()
index 2b00bf0..cdcf97e 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@ use 5.006;
 use strict;
 use warnings;
 use warnings::register;
-our $VERSION = '1.18';
+our $VERSION = '1.19';
 require Exporter;
 require Cwd;
 
@@ -324,81 +324,6 @@ in an unknown directory.
 
 =back
 
-=head1 NOTES
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-Mac OS (Classic) users should note a few differences:
-
-=over 4
-
-=item *
-
-The path separator is ':', not '/', and the current directory is denoted
-as ':', not '.'. You should be careful about specifying relative pathnames.
-While a full path always begins with a volume name, a relative pathname
-should always begin with a ':'.  If specifying a volume name only, a
-trailing ':' is required.
-
-=item *
-
-C<$File::Find::dir> is guaranteed to end with a ':'. If C<$_>
-contains the name of a directory, that name may or may not end with a
-':'. Likewise, C<$File::Find::name>, which contains the complete
-pathname to that directory, and C<$File::Find::fullname>, which holds
-the absolute pathname of that directory with all symbolic links resolved,
-may or may not end with a ':'.
-
-=item *
-
-The default C<untaint_pattern> (see above) on Mac OS is set to
-C<qr|^(.+)$|>. Note that the parentheses are vital.
-
-=item *
-
-The invisible system file "Icon\015" is ignored. While this file may
-appear in every directory, there are some more invisible system files
-on every volume, which are all located at the volume root level (i.e.
-"MacintoshHD:"). These system files are B<not> excluded automatically.
-Your filter may use the following code to recognize invisible files or
-directories (requires Mac::Files):
-
- use Mac::Files;
-
- # invisible() --  returns 1 if file/directory is invisible,
- # 0 if it's visible or undef if an error occurred
-
- sub invisible($) {
-   my $file = shift;
-   my ($fileCat, $fileInfo);
-   my $invisible_flag =  1 << 14;
-
-   if ( $fileCat = FSpGetCatInfo($file) ) {
-     if ($fileInfo = $fileCat->ioFlFndrInfo() ) {
-       return (($fileInfo->fdFlags & $invisible_flag) && 1);
-     }
-   }
-   return undef;
- }
-
-Generally, invisible files are system files, unless an odd application
-decides to use invisible files for its own purposes. To distinguish
-such files from system files, you have to look at the B<type> and B<creator>
-file attributes. The MacPerl built-in functions C<GetFileInfo(FILE)> and
-C<SetFileInfo(CREATOR, TYPE, FILES)> offer access to these attributes
-(see MacPerl.pm for details).
-
-Files that appear on the desktop actually reside in an (hidden) directory
-named "Desktop Folder" on the particular disk volume. Note that, although
-all desktop files appear to be on the same "virtual" desktop, each disk
-volume actually maintains its own "Desktop Folder" directory.
-
-=back
-
-=back
-
 =head1 BUGS AND CAVEATS
 
 Despite the name of the C<finddepth()> function, both C<find()> and
@@ -454,53 +379,6 @@ sub contract_name {
     return $abs_name;
 }
 
-# return the absolute name of a directory or file
-sub contract_name_Mac {
-    my ($cdir,$fn) = @_;
-    my $abs_name;
-
-    if ($fn =~ /^(:+)(.*)$/) { # valid pathname starting with a ':'
-
-       my $colon_count = length ($1);
-       if ($colon_count == 1) {
-           $abs_name = $cdir . $2;
-           return $abs_name;
-       }
-       else {
-           # need to move up the tree, but
-           # only if it's not a volume name
-           for (my $i=1; $i<$colon_count; $i++) {
-               unless ($cdir =~ /^[^:]+:$/) { # volume name
-                   $cdir =~ s/[^:]+:$//;
-               }
-               else {
-                   return undef;
-               }
-           }
-           $abs_name = $cdir . $2;
-           return $abs_name;
-       }
-
-    }
-    else {
-
-       # $fn may be a valid path to a directory or file or (dangling)
-       # symlink, without a leading ':'
-       if ( (-e $fn) || (-l $fn) ) {
-           if ($fn =~ /^[^:]+:/) { # a volume name like DataHD:*
-               return $fn; # $fn is already an absolute path
-           }
-           else {
-               $abs_name = $cdir . $fn;
-               return $abs_name;
-           }
-       }
-       else { # argh!, $fn is not a valid directory/file
-            return undef;
-       }
-    }
-}
-
 sub PathCombine($$) {
     my ($Base,$Name) = @_;
     my $AbsName;