This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Improve discussion of packages and their scopes.
authorJames E Keenan <jkeenan@cpan.org>
Tue, 6 Dec 2016 14:15:09 +0000 (09:15 -0500)
committerJames E Keenan <jkeenan@cpan.org>
Tue, 6 Dec 2016 14:15:09 +0000 (09:15 -0500)
For: RT #129345

Porting/checkAUTHORS.pl
pod/perlmod.pod

index b869c11..4204304 100755 (executable)
@@ -598,6 +598,7 @@ david\100justatheory.com                david\100wheeler.net
 +                                       david\100kineticode.com
 +                                       david\100wheeler.com
 +                                       david\100wheeler.net
+whatever\100davidnicol.com              davidnicol\100gmail.com
 dennis\100booking.com                   dennis\100camel.ams6.corp.booking.com
 +                                      dennis.kaarsemaker\100booking.com
 +                                       dennis\100kaarsemaker.net
index 0ed4bd9..888b54b 100644 (file)
@@ -28,23 +28,32 @@ Best practices for making a new module.
 =head2 Packages
 X<package> X<namespace> X<variable, global> X<global variable> X<global>
 
-Perl provides a mechanism for alternative namespaces to protect
-packages from stomping on each other's variables.  In fact, there's
-really no such thing as a global variable in Perl.  The package
-statement declares the compilation unit as being in the given
-namespace.  The scope of the package declaration is from the
+Unlike Perl 4, in which all the variables were dynamic and shared one
+global name space, causing maintainability problems, Perl 5 provides two
+mechanisms for protecting code from having its variables stomped on by
+other code: lexical variables created with C<my>, C<our> or C<state> and
+the C<package> declaration which instructs the compiler as to which
+namespace to prefix to unqualified dynamic names, which both protects
+against accidental stomping and provides an interface for deliberately
+clobbering global dynamic variables declared and used in other scopes or
+packages, when that is what you want to do.
+The scope of the package declaration is from the
 declaration itself through the end of the enclosing block, C<eval>,
-or file, whichever comes first (the same scope as the my() and
-local() operators).  Unqualified dynamic identifiers will be in
-this namespace, except for those few identifiers that if unqualified,
+or file, whichever comes first (the same scope as the my(), our(), state(), and
+local() operators, and also the effect
+of the experimental "reference aliasing," which may change), or until
+the next C<package> declaration.  Unqualified dynamic identifiers will be in
+this namespace, except for those few identifiers that, if unqualified,
 default to the main package instead of the current one as described
-below.  A package statement affects only dynamic variables--including
-those you've used local() on--but I<not> lexical variables created
-with my().  Typically it would be the first declaration in a file
+below.  A package statement affects only dynamic global
+symbols, including subroutine names, and variables you've used local()
+on, but I<not> lexical variables created with my(), our() or state().
+Typically it is the first declaration in a file
 included by the C<do>, C<require>, or C<use> operators.  You can
-switch into a package in more than one place; it merely influences
-which symbol table is used by the compiler for the rest of that
-block.  You can refer to variables and filehandles in other packages
+switch into a package in more than one place: C<package> has no
+effect beyond specifying which symbol table the compiler will use for
+dynamic symbols for the rest of that block or until the next C<package> statement.
+You can refer to variables and filehandles in other packages
 by prefixing the identifier with the package name and a double
 colon: C<$Package::Variable>.  If the package name is null, the
 C<main> package is assumed.  That is, C<$::sail> is equivalent to
@@ -69,7 +78,8 @@ are either local to the current package, or must be fully qualified
 from the outer package name down.  For instance, there is nowhere
 within package C<OUTER> that C<$INNER::var> refers to
 C<$OUTER::INNER::var>.  C<INNER> refers to a totally
-separate global package.
+separate global package. The custom of treating package names as a
+hierarchy is very strong, but the language in no way enforces it.
 
 Only identifiers starting with letters (or underscore) are stored
 in a package's symbol table.  All other symbols are kept in package
@@ -101,7 +111,9 @@ expressions in the context of the C<main> package (or wherever you came
 from).  See L<perldebug>.
 
 The special symbol C<__PACKAGE__> contains the current package, but cannot
-(easily) be used to construct variable names.
+(easily) be used to construct variable names. After C<my($foo)> has hidden
+package variable C<$foo>, it can still be accessed, without knowing what
+package you are in, as C<${__PACKAGE__.'::foo'}>.
 
 See L<perlsub> for other scoping issues related to my() and local(),
 and L<perlref> regarding closures.