This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Fix most of the bad L<> links of
authorTom Christiansen <tchrist@perl.com>
Tue, 11 Aug 1998 10:58:07 +0000 (05:58 -0500)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Wed, 2 Dec 1998 18:03:51 +0000 (18:03 +0000)
Subject: bad L<> links
Reply-to: tchrist@perl.com
To: perlbug@jhereg.perl.com
Message-Id: <199808111658.KAA00484@jhereg.perl.com>

The ones not fixed may require darker Pod::HTML magic,
for example the perlguts.html#tags should work fine, IMHO.

p4raw-id: //depot/cfgperl@2437

13 files changed:
pod/perl5005delta.pod
pod/perlcall.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlfaq5.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlobj.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perlvar.pod

index 23bf0f3..62787f5 100644 (file)
@@ -85,7 +85,7 @@ begin with C<perl> be referenced with a C<Perl_> prefix.  The bare function
 names without the C<Perl_> prefix are supported with macros, but this
 support may cease in a future release.
 
-See L<perlguts/API LISTING>.
+See L<perlguts/"API LISTING">.
 
 =item Enabling threads has source compatibility issues
 
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ directly accessing perl globals as C<GvSV(errgv)>.  The API call is
 backward compatible with existing perls and provides source compatibility
 with threading is enabled.
 
-See L<API Changes for more information>.
+See L<"C Source Compatibility"> for more information.
 
 =back
 
index e3e02de..8771be8 100644 (file)
@@ -72,7 +72,7 @@ Each of the functions will now be discussed in turn.
 
 =over 5
 
-=item B<perl_call_sv>
+=item perl_call_sv
 
 I<perl_call_sv> takes two parameters, the first, C<sv>, is an SV*.
 This allows you to specify the Perl subroutine to be called either as a
@@ -80,7 +80,7 @@ C string (which has first been converted to an SV) or a reference to a
 subroutine. The section, I<Using perl_call_sv>, shows how you can make
 use of I<perl_call_sv>.
 
-=item B<perl_call_pv>
+=item perl_call_pv
 
 The function, I<perl_call_pv>, is similar to I<perl_call_sv> except it
 expects its first parameter to be a C char* which identifies the Perl
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ subroutine you want to call, e.g., C<perl_call_pv("fred", 0)>.  If the
 subroutine you want to call is in another package, just include the
 package name in the string, e.g., C<"pkg::fred">.
 
-=item B<perl_call_method>
+=item perl_call_method
 
 The function I<perl_call_method> is used to call a method from a Perl
 class.  The parameter C<methname> corresponds to the name of the method
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ object (for a virtual method).  See L<perlobj> for more information on
 static and virtual methods and L<Using perl_call_method> for an example
 of using I<perl_call_method>.
 
-=item B<perl_call_argv>
+=item perl_call_argv
 
 I<perl_call_argv> calls the Perl subroutine specified by the C string
 stored in the C<subname> parameter. It also takes the usual C<flags>
index 8f700f6..9e41c2c 100644 (file)
@@ -253,7 +253,7 @@ literals are subject to backslash and variable substitution;
 single-quoted strings are not (except for "C<\'>" and "C<\\>").
 The usual Unix backslash rules apply for making characters such as
 newline, tab, etc., as well as some more exotic forms.  See
-L<perlop/Quote and Quotelike Operators> for a list.
+L<perlop/"Quote and Quotelike Operators"> for a list.
 
 Octal or hex representations in string literals (e.g. '0xffff') are not
 automatically converted to their integer representation.  The hex() and
index 29ed897..50552cf 100644 (file)
@@ -1428,7 +1428,7 @@ architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest octal literal is
 (S) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Perl keeps track of the number
 of times you've called C<fork> and C<exec>, to determine
 whether the current call to C<exec> should affect the current
-script or a subprocess (see L<perlvms/exec>).  Somehow, this count
+script or a subprocess (see L<perlvms/"exec LIST">).  Somehow, this count
 has become scrambled, so Perl is making a guess and treating
 this C<exec> as a request to terminate the Perl script
 and execute the specified command.
index 015c9b4..3e1103b 100644 (file)
@@ -289,8 +289,8 @@ pair to make it easy to sort the hash in insertion order.
     }
 
 For passing filehandles to functions, the easiest way is to 
-prefer them with a star, as in func(*STDIN).  See L<perlfaq7/"Passing
-Filehandles"> for details.
+prefer them with a star, as in func(*STDIN).
+See L<perlfaq7/"Passing Filehandles"> for details.
 
 If you want to create many, anonymous handles, you should check out the
 Symbol, FileHandle, or IO::Handle (etc.) modules.  Here's the equivalent
index cb7f3c0..07a6570 100644 (file)
@@ -594,7 +594,7 @@ Why do you want to do that? :-)
 If you want to override a predefined function, such as open(),
 then you'll have to import the new definition from a different
 module.  See L<perlsub/"Overriding Builtin Functions">.  There's
-also an example in L<perltoot/"Class::Template">.
+also an example in L<perltoot/"Class::Struct">.
 
 If you want to overload a Perl operator, such as C<+> or C<**>,
 then you'll want to use the C<use overload> pragma, documented
index 557d418..e8546be 100644 (file)
@@ -1592,7 +1592,7 @@ is left as an exercise to the reader.
 The C<POSIX::getattr()> function can do this more portably on systems
 purporting POSIX compliance.
 See also the C<Term::ReadKey> module from your nearest CPAN site;
-details on CPAN can be found on L<perlmod/CPAN>.
+details on CPAN can be found on L<perlmodlib/CPAN>.
 
 =item getlogin
 
@@ -2526,7 +2526,7 @@ them, and automatically close whenever and however you leave that scope:
        $first;                                 # Or here.
     }
 
-See L</seek()> for some details about mixing reading and writing.
+See L</seek> for some details about mixing reading and writing.
 
 =item opendir DIRHANDLE,EXPR
 
@@ -3410,7 +3410,7 @@ busy multitasking system.
 
 For delays of finer granularity than one second, you may use Perl's
 C<syscall()> interface to access setitimer(2) if your system supports it,
-or else see L</select()> above.
+or else see L</select> above.
 
 See also the POSIX module's C<sigpause()> function.
 
@@ -4221,7 +4221,7 @@ Unlike C<dbmopen()>, the C<tie()> function will not use or require a module
 for you--you need to do that explicitly yourself.  See L<DB_File>
 or the F<Config> module for interesting C<tie()> implementations.
 
-For further details see L<perltie>, L<tied VARIABLE>.
+For further details see L<perltie>, L<"tied VARIABLE">.
 
 =item tied VARIABLE
 
index 38d7569..4ccc6c6 100644 (file)
@@ -1025,13 +1025,13 @@ There is a way to achieve a similar task from C via Perl API: create a
 I<pseudo-block>, and arrange for some changes to be automatically
 undone at the end of it, either explicit, or via a non-local exit (via
 die()). A I<block>-like construct is created by a pair of
-C<ENTER>/C<LEAVE> macros (see L<perlcall/EXAMPLE/"Returning a
-Scalar">).  Such a construct may be created specially for some
-important localized task, or an existing one (like boundaries of
-enclosing Perl subroutine/block, or an existing pair for freeing TMPs)
-may be used. (In the second case the overhead of additional
-localization must be almost negligible.) Note that any XSUB is
-automatically enclosed in an C<ENTER>/C<LEAVE> pair.
+C<ENTER>/C<LEAVE> macros (see L<perlcall/"Returning a Scalar">).
+Such a construct may be created specially for some important localized
+task, or an existing one (like boundaries of enclosing Perl
+subroutine/block, or an existing pair for freeing TMPs) may be
+used. (In the second case the overhead of additional localization must
+be almost negligible.) Note that any XSUB is automatically enclosed in
+an C<ENTER>/C<LEAVE> pair.
 
 Inside such a I<pseudo-block> the following service is available:
 
index ba93f18..dba15fe 100644 (file)
@@ -330,7 +330,7 @@ Second, if using the listed commands you see something B<exactly>
 (prefix matches do not count and case usually counts) like "En_US"
 without the quotes, then you should be okay because you are using a
 locale name that should be installed and available in your system.
-In this case, see L<Fixing system locale configuration>.
+In this case, see L<Permanently fixing system locale configuration>.
 
 =head2 Permanently fixing your locale configuration
 
@@ -349,7 +349,7 @@ rules for matching locale names are a bit vague because
 standardization is weak in this area.  See again the L<Finding
 locales> about general rules.
 
-=head2 Permanently fixing system locale configuration
+=head2 Fixing system locale configuration
 
 Contact a system administrator (preferably your own) and report the exact
 error message you get, and ask them to read this same documentation you
@@ -855,7 +855,7 @@ always in force, even if the program environment suggested otherwise
 (see L<The setlocale function>).  By default, Perl still behaves this
 way for backward compatibility.  If you want a Perl application to pay
 attention to locale information, you B<must> use the S<C<use locale>>
-pragma (see L<The use locale Pragma>) to instruct it to do so.
+pragma (see L<The use locale pragma>) to instruct it to do so.
 
 Versions of Perl from 5.002 to 5.003 did use the C<LC_CTYPE>
 information if available; that is, C<\w> did understand what
index f10fbdf..182e3ee 100644 (file)
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ that wish to call methods in the class as part of the construction:
     }
 
 If you care about inheritance (and you should; see
-L<perlmod/"Modules: Creation, Use, and Abuse">),
+L<perlmodlib/"Modules: Creation, Use, and Abuse">),
 then you want to use the two-arg form of bless
 so that your constructors may be inherited:
 
index 918827c..06c993b 100644 (file)
@@ -822,7 +822,7 @@ an effect on what happens with some perl functions (such as C<chr>,
 C<pack>, C<print>, C<printf>, C<ord>, C<sort>, C<sprintf>, C<unpack>), as
 well as bit-fiddling with ASCII constants using operators like C<^>, C<&>
 and C<|>, not to mention dealing with socket interfaces to ASCII computers
-(see L<"NEWLINES">).
+(see L<Newlines>).
 
 Fortunately, most web servers for the mainframe will correctly translate
 the C<\n> in the following statement to its ASCII equivalent (note that
index 957b3d8..95fbb6b 100644 (file)
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ pre-defined things are C<BEGIN>, C<END>, C<AUTOLOAD>, and C<DESTROY>--plus all t
 functions mentioned in L<perltie>.  The 5.005 release adds C<INIT>
 to this list.
 
-=head2 Private Variables via C<my()>
+=head2 Private Variables via my()
 
 Synopsis:
 
index fb27bfb..b9b0ce6 100644 (file)
@@ -845,12 +845,16 @@ specified, and the value is the location of the file actually found.
 The C<require> command uses this array to determine whether a given file
 has already been included.
 
-=item %ENV  $ENV{expr}
+=item %ENV
+
+=item $ENV{expr}
 
 The hash %ENV contains your current environment.  Setting a
 value in C<ENV> changes the environment for child processes.
 
-=item %SIG  $SIG{expr}
+=item %SIG
+
+=item $SIG{expr}
 
 The hash %SIG is used to set signal handlers for various
 signals.  Example: