This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
* Em dash cleanup in pod/
authorbrian d foy <bdfoy@cpan.org>
Wed, 13 Jan 2010 16:19:25 +0000 (17:19 +0100)
committerbrian d foy <bdfoy@cpan.org>
Wed, 13 Jan 2010 16:19:25 +0000 (17:19 +0100)
I looked at all the instances of spaces around -- and in most cases
converted the sentences to use more appropriate punctuation. In
general, the -- in the perl docs seem to be there only to make
really complicated and really long sentences.

I didn't look at the closed em-dashes. They probably have the same
sentence-complexity problem.

I left some open em-dashes in place. Those are the ones used in
lists.

35 files changed:
pod/perl5004delta.pod
pod/perl5005delta.pod
pod/perl571delta.pod
pod/perlboot.pod
pod/perlcall.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perldbmfilter.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perldoc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perlintro.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perllexwarn.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlmodinstall.pod
pod/perlmodstyle.pod
pod/perlobj.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlpod.pod
pod/perlpodspec.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlrebackslash.pod
pod/perlreguts.pod
pod/perlrepository.pod
pod/perlreref.pod
pod/perlretut.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perltie.pod
pod/perltoot.pod
pod/perlunicode.pod
pod/perluniintro.pod
pod/perlxs.pod
pod/perlxstut.pod

index 572c2b5..c83f3e6 100644 (file)
@@ -195,8 +195,8 @@ A bug in previous versions may have failed to detect some insecure
 conditions when taint checks are turned on.  (Taint checks are used
 in setuid or setgid scripts, or when explicitly turned on with the
 C<-T> invocation option.)  Although it's unlikely, this may cause a
-previously-working script to now fail -- which should be construed
-as a blessing, since that indicates a potentially-serious security
+previously-working script to now fail, which should be construed
+as a blessing since that indicates a potentially-serious security
 hole was just plugged.
 
 The new restrictions when tainting include:
@@ -246,7 +246,7 @@ your interpreters.
 
 File handles are now stored internally as type IO::Handle.  The
 FileHandle module is still supported for backwards compatibility, but
-it is now merely a front end to the IO::* modules -- specifically,
+it is now merely a front end to the IO::* modules, specifically
 IO::Handle, IO::Seekable, and IO::File.  We suggest, but do not
 require, that you use the IO::* modules in new code.
 
@@ -1214,8 +1214,8 @@ or a hash slice, such as
 
 (W) The pattern match (//), substitution (s///), and transliteration (tr///)
 operators work on scalar values.  If you apply one of them to an array
-or a hash, it will convert the array or hash to a scalar value -- the
-length of an array, or the population info of a hash -- and then work on
+or a hash, it will convert the array or hash to a scalar value (the
+length of an array or the population info of a hash) and then work on
 that scalar value.  This is probably not what you meant to do.  See
 L<perlfunc/grep> and L<perlfunc/map> for alternatives.
 
index 6420f87..cabdf9e 100644 (file)
@@ -766,7 +766,7 @@ only with arrays that have a hash reference at index 0.
 (F) You said something like C<< local $ar->{'key'} >>, where $ar is
 a reference to a pseudo-hash.  That hasn't been implemented yet, but
 you can get a similar effect by localizing the corresponding array
-element directly -- C<< local $ar->[$ar->[0]{'key'}] >>.
+element directly: C<< local $ar->[$ar->[0]{'key'}] >>.
 
 =item Can't use %%! because Errno.pm is not available
 
index d25bee0..be36e04 100644 (file)
@@ -935,7 +935,7 @@ machines (Perl's malloc is mostly tuned for space).
 
 Many new tests have been added.  The most notable is probably the
 lib/1_compile: it is very notable because running it takes quite a
-long time -- it test compiles all the Perl modules in the distribution.
+long time. It test compiles all the Perl modules in the distribution.
 Please be patient.
 
 =head1 Known Problems
index cf8e518..a6b256a 100644 (file)
@@ -442,7 +442,7 @@ variations.
 
 Now, what about data?
 
-=head2 A horse is a horse, of course of course -- or is it?
+=head2 A horse is a horse, of course of course, or is it?
 
 Let's start with the code for the C<Animal> class
 and the C<Horse> class:
index 06f3aa3..359e097 100644 (file)
@@ -1889,8 +1889,8 @@ The idea is that the calling context only needs to be
 created and destroyed once, and the sub can be called
 arbitrarily many times in between.
 
-It is usual to pass parameters using global variables -- typically
-$_ for one parameter, or $a and $b for two parameters -- rather
+It is usual to pass parameters using global variables (typically
+$_ for one parameter, or $a and $b for two parameters) rather
 than via @_. (It is possible to use the @_ mechanism if you know
 what you're doing, though there is as yet no supported API for
 it. It's also inherently slower.)
index 3c1a95e..bc564e6 100644 (file)
@@ -633,9 +633,9 @@ key/value pairs.  That's why it's good to use references sometimes.
 It is often more readable to use the C<< => >> operator between key/value
 pairs.  The C<< => >> operator is mostly just a more visually distinctive
 synonym for a comma, but it also arranges for its left-hand operand to be
-interpreted as a string -- if it's a bareword that would be a legal simple
-identifier (C<< => >> doesn't quote compound identifiers, that contain
-double colons). This makes it nice for initializing hashes:
+interpreted as a string if it's a bareword that would be a legal simple
+identifierC<< => >> doesn't quote compound identifiers, that contain
+double colons. This makes it nice for initializing hashes:
 
     %map = (
                  red   => 0x00f,
index f145b8a..e58ce20 100644 (file)
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ When each filter is called by Perl, a local copy of C<$_> will contain
 the key or value to be filtered. Filtering is achieved by modifying
 the contents of C<$_>. The return code from the filter is ignored.
 
-=head2 An Example -- the NULL termination problem.
+=head2 An Example: the NULL termination problem.
 
 DBM Filters are useful for a class of problems where you I<always>
 want to make the same transformation to all keys, all values or both.
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ self-explanatory. Both "fetch" filters remove the terminating NULL,
 and both "store" filters add a terminating NULL.
 
 
-=head2 Another Example -- Key is a C int.
+=head2 Another Example: Key is a C int.
 
 Here is another real-life example. By default, whenever Perl writes to
 a DBM database it always writes the key and value as strings. So when
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ Here is a DBM Filter that does it:
 The code above uses DB_File, but again it will work with any of the
 DBM modules.
 
-This time only two filters have been used -- we only need to manipulate
+This time only two filters have been used; we only need to manipulate
 the contents of the key, so it wasn't necessary to install any value
 filters.
 
index 34935ef..9403e55 100644 (file)
@@ -115,8 +115,8 @@ which 'splits' output into two streams, such as
 (W misc) The pattern match (C<//>), substitution (C<s///>), and
 transliteration (C<tr///>) operators work on scalar values.  If you apply
 one of them to an array or a hash, it will convert the array or hash to
-a scalar value -- the length of an array, or the population info of a
-hash -- and then work on that scalar value.  This is probably not what
+a scalar value (the length of an array, or the population info of a
+hash) and then work on that scalar value.  This is probably not what
 you meant to do.  See L<perlfunc/grep> and L<perlfunc/map> for
 alternatives.
 
index 9240439..883a618 100644 (file)
@@ -165,7 +165,7 @@ might be more (or less) convenient, depending on what shell you use.
 
 =item B<-X>
 
-Use an index if it is present -- the B<-X> option looks for an entry
+Use an index if it is present. The B<-X> option looks for an entry
 whose basename matches the name given on the command line in the file
 C<$Config{archlib}/pod.idx>. The F<pod.idx> file should contain fully
 qualified filenames, one per line.
@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@ plain text or unformatted pod.)
 One useful value for C<PERLDOC_PAGER> is C<less -+C -E>.
 
 Having PERLDOCDEBUG set to a positive integer will make perldoc emit
-even more descriptive output than the C<-v> switch does -- the higher the
+even more descriptive output than the C<-v> switch does; the higher the
 number, the more it emits.
 
 
index 8428fe3..5a68341 100644 (file)
@@ -786,7 +786,7 @@ to survive its use on the stack you need not do any mortalization.
 If you are not sure then doing an C<SvREFCNT_inc> and C<sv_2mortal>, or
 making a C<sv_mortalcopy> is safer.
 
-The mortal routines are not just for SVs -- AVs and HVs can be
+The mortal routines are not just for SVs; AVs and HVs can be
 made mortal by passing their address (type-casted to C<SV*>) to the
 C<sv_2mortal> or C<sv_mortalcopy> routines.
 
@@ -1624,11 +1624,10 @@ and C<dXSTARG>.
 =head2 Scratchpads
 
 The question remains on when the SVs which are I<target>s for opcodes
-are created. The answer is that they are created when the current unit --
-a subroutine or a file (for opcodes for statements outside of
-subroutines) -- is compiled. During this time a special anonymous Perl
-array is created, which is called a scratchpad for the current
-unit.
+are created. The answer is that they are created when the current
+unit--a subroutine or a file (for opcodes for statements outside of
+subroutines)--is compiled. During this time a special anonymous Perl
+array is created, which is called a scratchpad for the current unit.
 
 A scratchpad keeps SVs which are lexicals for the current unit and are
 targets for opcodes. One can deduce that an SV lives on a scratchpad
index fb9bdb8..ef59eba 100644 (file)
@@ -1267,8 +1267,8 @@ C<-Wstrict-prototypes>
 =back
 
 The C<-Wtraditional> is another example of the annoying tendency of
-gcc to bundle a lot of warnings under one switch -- it would be
-impossible to deploy in practice because it would complain a lot -- but
+gcc to bundle a lot of warnings under one switch (it would be
+impossible to deploy in practice because it would complain a lot) but
 it does contain some warnings that would be beneficial to have available
 on their own, such as the warning about string constants inside macros
 containing the macro arguments: this behaved differently pre-ANSI
@@ -2178,7 +2178,7 @@ in L<perlguts>.
 The following are common causes of compilation and/or execution
 failures, not common to Perl as such.  The C FAQ is good bedtime
 reading.  Please test your changes with as many C compilers and
-platforms as possible -- we will, anyway, and it's nice to save
+platforms as possible; we will, anyway, and it's nice to save
 oneself from public embarrassment.
 
 If using gcc, you can add the C<-std=c89> option which will hopefully
@@ -2681,25 +2681,25 @@ Third Degree greatly slows down the execution: seconds become minutes,
 minutes become hours.  For example as of Perl 5.8.1, the
 ext/Encode/t/Unicode.t takes extraordinarily long to complete under
 e.g. Purify, Third Degree, and valgrind.  Under valgrind it takes more
-than six hours, even on a snappy computer-- the said test must be
+than six hours, even on a snappy computer. The said test must be
 doing something that is quite unfriendly for memory debuggers.  If you
 don't feel like waiting, that you can simply kill away the perl
 process.
 
 B<NOTE 2>: To minimize the number of memory leak false alarms (see
-L</PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information), you have to have
-environment variable PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL set to 2.  The F<TEST>
-and harness scripts do that automatically.  But if you are running
-some of the tests manually-- for csh-like shells:
+L</PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information), you have to set the
+environment variable PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL to 2. 
+
+For csh-like shells:
 
     setenv PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL 2
 
-and for Bourne-type shells:
+For Bourne-type shells:
 
     PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL=2
     export PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL
 
-or in Unixy environments you can also use the C<env> command:
+In Unixy environments you can also use the C<env> command:
 
     env PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL=2 valgrind ./perl -Ilib ...
 
index 9973fd6..2f5f85e 100644 (file)
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ of elements in the array:
     if (@animals < 5) { ... }
 
 The elements we're getting from the array start with a C<$> because
-we're getting just a single value out of the array -- you ask for a scalar,
+we're getting just a single value out of the array; you ask for a scalar,
 you get a scalar.
 
 To get multiple values from an array:
@@ -443,7 +443,7 @@ before 99).
     !   not
 
 (C<and>, C<or> and C<not> aren't just in the above table as descriptions
-of the operators -- they're also supported as operators in their own
+of the operators. They're also supported as operators in their own
 right.  They're more readable than the C-style operators, but have
 different precedence to C<&&> and friends.  Check L<perlop> for more
 detail.)
index 25b310b..4f6c0f0 100644 (file)
@@ -316,8 +316,8 @@ The pragmatic approach was to say "I know the risks, but prefer the
 convenience", and to do anything you wanted in your signal handler,
 and be prepared to clean up core dumps now and again.
 
-In Perl 5.7.3 and later to avoid these problems signals are
-"deferred"-- that is when the signal is delivered to the process by
+Perl 5.7.3 and later avoid these problems by "deferring" signals.
+That is, when the signal is delivered to the process by
 the system (to the C code that implements Perl) a flag is set, and the
 handler returns immediately. Then at strategic "safe" points in the
 Perl interpreter (e.g. when it is about to execute a new opcode) the
index 45a7f5f..835914e 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ a block of code. You might expect this to be enough to do the trick:
      }
 
 When this code is run with the B<-w> flag, a warning will be produced
-for the C<$a> line -- C<"Reversed += operator">.
+for the C<$a> line C<"Reversed += operator">.
 
 The problem is that Perl has both compile-time and run-time warnings. To
 disable compile-time warnings you need to rewrite the code like this:
@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ will work unchanged.
 
 =item 2.
 
-The B<-w> flag just sets the global C<$^W> variable as in 5.005 -- this
+The B<-w> flag just sets the global C<$^W> variable as in 5.005. This
 means that any legacy code that currently relies on manipulating C<$^W>
 to control warning behavior will still work as is. 
 
index 4a7c62d..eaa8ba9 100644 (file)
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ refer to the same scalar value. This means that the following code:
     }
 
 Would print '1', because C<$foo> holds a reference to the I<original>
-C<$bar> -- the one that was stuffed away by C<local()> and which will be
+C<$bar>. The one that was stuffed away by C<local()> and which will be
 restored when the block ends. Because variables are accessed through the
 typeglob, you can use C<*foo = *bar> to create an alias which can be
 localized. (But be aware that this means you can't have a separate
@@ -267,7 +267,7 @@ these code blocks by name.
 A C<BEGIN> code block is executed as soon as possible, that is, the moment
 it is completely defined, even before the rest of the containing file (or
 string) is parsed.  You may have multiple C<BEGIN> blocks within a file (or
-eval'ed string) -- they will execute in order of definition.  Because a C<BEGIN>
+eval'ed string); they will execute in order of definition.  Because a C<BEGIN>
 code block executes immediately, it can pull in definitions of subroutines
 and such from other files in time to be visible to the rest of the compile
 and run time.  Once a C<BEGIN> has run, it is immediately undefined and any
index 0229385..a7b74be 100644 (file)
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ Here's how to perform each step for each operating system.  This is
 might have come with your module!
 
 Also note that these instructions are tailored for installing the
-module into your system's repository of Perl modules -- but you can
+module into your system's repository of Perl modules, but you can
 install modules into any directory you wish.  For instance, where I
 say C<perl Makefile.PL>, you can substitute C<perl Makefile.PL
 PREFIX=/my/perl_directory> to install the modules into
@@ -110,7 +110,7 @@ Make sure you have the appropriate permissions to install the module
 in your Perl 5 library directory.  Often, you'll need to be root.
 
 That's all you need to do on Unix systems with dynamic linking.
-Most Unix systems have dynamic linking -- if yours doesn't, or if for
+Most Unix systems have dynamic linking. If yours doesn't, or if for
 another reason you have a statically-linked perl, B<and> the
 module requires compilation, you'll need to build a new Perl binary
 that includes the module.  Again, you'll probably need to be root.
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ http://search.cpan.org/dist/dmake/
 Does the module require compilation (i.e. does it have files that end
 in .xs, .c, .h, .y, .cc, .cxx, or .C)?  If it does, life is now
 officially tough for you, because you have to compile the module
-yourself -- no easy feat on Windows.  You'll need a compiler such as
+yourself (no easy feat on Windows).  You'll need a compiler such as
 Visual C++.  Alternatively, you can download a pre-built PPM package
 from ActiveState.
 http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Downloads/ActivePerl/PPM/
index a5e332e..dfe5662 100644 (file)
@@ -679,7 +679,7 @@ and the tests should also be available to people installing the modules
 For Module::Build you would use the C<make test> equivalent C<perl Build test>.
 
 The importance of these tests is proportional to the alleged stability of a 
-module -- a module which purports to be stable or which hopes to achieve wide 
+module. A module which purports to be stable or which hopes to achieve wide 
 use should adhere to as strict a testing regime as possible.
 
 Useful modules to help you write tests (with minimum impact on your 
index 6d335e5..fdecd84 100644 (file)
@@ -350,8 +350,8 @@ Usually Perl gets it right, but when it doesn't you get a function
 call compiled as a method, or vice versa.  This can introduce subtle bugs
 that are hard to detect.
 
-For example, a call to a method C<new> in indirect notation -- as C++
-programmers are wont to make -- can be miscompiled into a subroutine
+For example, a call to a method C<new> in indirect notation (as C++
+programmers are wont to make) can be miscompiled into a subroutine
 call if there's already a C<new> function in scope.  You'd end up
 calling the current package's C<new> as a subroutine, rather than the
 desired class's method.  The compiler tries to cheat by remembering
index 028c808..d36b090 100644 (file)
@@ -1286,7 +1286,7 @@ The last example should print:
 
 Notice that the final match matched C<q> instead of C<p>, which a match
 without the C<\G> anchor would have done. Also note that the final match
-did not update C<pos> -- C<pos> is only updated on a C</g> match. If the
+did not update C<pos>. C<pos> is only updated on a C</g> match. If the
 final match did indeed match C<p>, it's a good bet that you're running an
 older (pre-5.6.0) Perl.
 
@@ -1806,7 +1806,7 @@ must be sure there is a newline after it; otherwise, Perl will give the
 warning B<Can't find string terminator "END" anywhere before EOF...>.
 
 Additionally, the quoting rules for the end of string identifier are not
-related to Perl's quoting rules -- C<q()>, C<qq()>, and the like are not
+related to Perl's quoting rules. C<q()>, C<qq()>, and the like are not
 supported in place of C<''> and C<"">, and the only interpolation is for
 backslashing the quoting character:
 
@@ -2070,7 +2070,7 @@ which are processed further.
 X<regexp, parse>
 
 Previous steps were performed during the compilation of Perl code,
-but this one happens at run time--although it may be optimized to
+but this one happens at run timealthough it may be optimized to
 be calculated at compile time if appropriate.  After preprocessing
 described above, and possibly after evaluation if concatenation,
 joining, casing translation, or metaquoting are involved, the
@@ -2229,7 +2229,7 @@ is equivalent to the following Perl-like pseudo code:
 except that it isn't so cumbersome to say, and will actually work.
 It really does shift the @ARGV array and put the current filename
 into the $ARGV variable.  It also uses filehandle I<ARGV>
-internally--<> is just a synonym for <ARGV>, which
+internally<> is just a synonym for <ARGV>, which
 is magical.  (The pseudo code above doesn't work because it treats
 <ARGV> as non-magical.)
 
index 2f4e5c5..826dea5 100644 (file)
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ Don't put "=headI<n>" commands inside an "=over" ... "=back" region.
 And perhaps most importantly, keep the items consistent: either use
 "=item *" for all of them, to produce bullets; or use "=item 1.",
 "=item 2.", etc., to produce numbered lists; or use "=item foo",
-"=item bar", etc. -- namely, things that look nothing like bullets or
+"=item bar", etc.--namely, things that look nothing like bullets or
 numbers.
 
 If you start with bullets or numbers, stick with them, as
@@ -708,8 +708,8 @@ that could cause odd formatting.
 Older translators might add wording around an LE<lt>E<gt> link, so that
 C<LE<lt>Foo::BarE<gt>> may become "the Foo::Bar manpage", for example.
 So you shouldn't write things like C<the LE<lt>fooE<gt>
-documentation>, if you want the translated document to read sensibly
--- instead write C<the LE<lt>Foo::Bar|Foo::BarE<gt> documentation> or
+documentation>, if you want the translated document to read sensibly.
+Instead, write C<the LE<lt>Foo::Bar|Foo::BarE<gt> documentation> or
 C<LE<lt>the Foo::Bar documentation|Foo::BarE<gt>>, to control how the
 link comes out.
 
index da62a35..b7c3122 100644 (file)
@@ -30,7 +30,7 @@ it implicates that such an option I<may> be provided.
 
 =head1 Pod Definitions
 
-Pod is embedded in files, typically Perl source files -- although you
+Pod is embedded in files, typically Perl source files, although you
 can write a file that's nothing but Pod.
 
 A B<line> in a file consists of zero or more non-newline characters,
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ A B<non-blank line> is a line containing one or more characters other
 than space or tab (and terminated by a newline or end-of-file).
 
 (I<Note:> Many older Pod parsers did not accept a line consisting of
-spaces/tabs and then a newline as a blank line -- the only lines they
+spaces/tabs and then a newline as a blank line. The only lines they
 considered blank were lines consisting of I<no characters at all>,
 terminated by a newline.)
 
@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ etc.).
 
 Pod content is contained in B<Pod blocks>.  A Pod block starts with a
 line that matches <m/\A=[a-zA-Z]/>, and continues up to the next line
-that matches C<m/\A=cut/> -- or up to the end of the file, if there is
+that matches C<m/\A=cut/> or up to the end of the file if there is
 no C<m/\A=cut/> line.
 
 =for comment
@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ I<Some> command paragraphs allow formatting codes in their content
 
 In other words, the Pod processing handler for "head1" will apply the
 same processing to "Did You Remember to CE<lt>use strict;>?" that it
-would to an ordinary paragraph -- i.e., formatting codes (like
+would to an ordinary paragraph (i.e., formatting codes like
 "CE<lt>...>") are parsed and presumably formatted appropriately, and
 whitespace in the form of literal spaces and/or tabs is not
 significant.
@@ -415,7 +415,7 @@ formatting code.  Examples:
     B<< $foo->bar(); >>
 
 With this syntax, the whitespace character(s) after the "CE<lt><<"
-and before the ">>" (or whatever letter) are I<not> renderable -- they
+and before the ">>" (or whatever letter) are I<not> renderable. They
 do not signify whitespace, are merely part of the formatting codes
 themselves.  That is, these are all synonymous:
 
@@ -1121,14 +1121,14 @@ link text.  Note that link text may contain formatting.)
 
 =item Second:
 
-The possibly inferred link-text -- i.e., if there was no real link
+The possibly inferred link-text; i.e., if there was no real link
 text, then this is the text that we'll infer in its place.  (E.g., for
 "LE<lt>Getopt::Std>", the inferred link text is "Getopt::Std".)
 
 =item Third:
 
 The name or URL, or undef if none.  (E.g., in "LE<lt>Perl
-Functions|perlfunc>", the name -- also sometimes called the page --
+Functions|perlfunc>", the name (also sometimes called the page)
 is "perlfunc".  In "LE<lt>/CAVEATS>", the name is undef.)
 
 =item Fourth:
@@ -1302,9 +1302,8 @@ for formatting or for EE<lt>...> escapes, as in:
   L<B<ummE<234>stuff>|...>
 
 For C<LE<lt>...E<gt>> codes without a "name|" part, only
-C<EE<lt>...E<gt>> and C<ZE<lt>E<gt>> codes may occur -- no
-other formatting codes.  That is, authors should not use
-"C<LE<lt>BE<lt>Foo::BarE<gt>E<gt>>".
+C<EE<lt>...E<gt>> and C<ZE<lt>E<gt>> codes may occur.  That is,
+authors should not use "C<LE<lt>BE<lt>Foo::BarE<gt>E<gt>>".
 
 Note, however, that formatting codes and ZE<lt>>'s can occur in any
 and all parts of an LE<lt>...> (i.e., in I<name>, I<section>, I<text>,
@@ -1874,7 +1873,7 @@ currently open region has the formatname "inner", not "outer".  (It just
 happens that "outer" is the format name of a higher-up region.)  This is
 an error.  Processors must by default report this as an error, and may halt
 processing the document containing that error.  A corollary of this is that
-regions cannot "overlap" -- i.e., the latter block above does not represent
+regions cannot "overlap". That is, the latter block above does not represent
 a region called "outer" which contains X and Y, overlapping a region called
 "inner" which contains Y and Z.  But because it is invalid (as all
 apparently overlapping regions would be), it doesn't represent that, or
index 1bcc477..87b2b27 100644 (file)
@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ Don't count on per-program environment variables, or per-program current
 directories.
 
 Don't count on specific values of C<$!>, neither numeric nor
-especially the strings values-- users may switch their locales causing
+especially the strings values. Users may switch their locales causing
 error messages to be translated into their languages.  If you can
 trust a POSIXish environment, you can portably use the symbols defined
 by the Errno module, like ENOENT.  And don't trust on the values of C<$!>
@@ -518,13 +518,13 @@ Don't assume that you can ping hosts and get replies.
 
 Don't assume that any particular port (service) will respond.
 
-Don't assume that Sys::Hostname (or any other API or command)
-returns either a fully qualified hostname or a non-qualified hostname:
-it all depends on how the system had been configured.  Also remember
-things like DHCP and NAT-- the hostname you get back might not be very
-useful.
+Don't assume that Sys::Hostname (or any other API or command) returns
+either a fully qualified hostname or a non-qualified hostname: it all
+depends on how the system had been configured.  Also remember that for
+things such as DHCP and NAT, the hostname you get back might not be
+very useful.
 
-All the above "don't":s may look daunting, and they are -- but the key
+All the above "don't":s may look daunting, and they are, but the key
 is to degrade gracefully if one cannot reach the particular network
 service one wants.  Croaking or hanging do not look very professional.
 
@@ -706,8 +706,8 @@ more efficient that the first.
 =head2 Security
 
 Most multi-user platforms provide basic levels of security, usually
-implemented at the filesystem level.  Some, however, do
-not-- unfortunately.  Thus the notion of user id, or "home" directory,
+implemented at the filesystem level.  Some, however, unfortunately do
+not.  Thus the notion of user id, or "home" directory,
 or even the state of being logged-in, may be unrecognizable on many
 platforms.  If you write programs that are security-conscious, it
 is usually best to know what type of system you will be running
@@ -721,7 +721,7 @@ their semantics might be different.
 
 (From security viewpoint testing for permissions before attempting to
 do something is silly anyway: if one tries this, there is potential
-for race conditions-- someone or something might change the
+for race conditions. Someone or something might change the
 permissions between the permissions check and the actual operation.
 Just try the operation.)
 
index b7a6bdc..3d3a76f 100644 (file)
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ contain a hyphen, so there is no ambiguity.
 
 =head2 Assertions
 
-Assertions are conditions that have to be true -- they don't actually
+Assertions are conditions that have to be true; they don't actually
 match parts of the substring. There are six assertions that are written as
 backslash sequences.
 
index 17adf78..ec1c243 100644 (file)
@@ -685,7 +685,7 @@ that is a permissive version of Unicode's UTF-8 encoding[2]. This uses single
 bytes to represent characters from the ASCII character set, and sequences
 of two or more bytes for all other characters. (See L<perlunitut>
 for more information about the relationship between UTF-8 and perl's
-encoding, utf8 -- the difference isn't important for this discussion.)
+encoding, utf8. The difference isn't important for this discussion.)
 
 No matter how you look at it, Unicode support is going to be a pain in a
 regex engine. Tricks that might be fine when you have 256 possible
index 46fbf66..cc303b1 100644 (file)
@@ -833,7 +833,7 @@ original commit in the new commit message.
 =head1 GRAFTS
 
 The perl history contains one mistake which was not caught in the
-conversion -- a merge was recorded in the history between blead and
+conversion: a merge was recorded in the history between blead and
 maint-5.10 where no merge actually occurred.  Due to the nature of git,
 this is now impossible to fix in the public repository.  You can remove
 this mis-merge locally by adding the following line to your
index eb3933a..f7d01b8 100644 (file)
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ All are zero-width assertions.
 
 =head2 QUANTIFIERS
 
-Quantifiers are greedy by default -- match the B<longest> leftmost.
+Quantifiers are greedy by default and match the B<longest> leftmost.
 
    Maximal Minimal Possessive Allowed range
    ------- ------- ---------- -------------
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ The possessive forms (new in Perl 5.10) prevent backtracking: what gets
 matched by a pattern with a possessive quantifier will not be backtracked
 into, even if that causes the whole match to fail.
 
-There is no quantifier {,n} -- that gets understood as a literal string.
+There is no quantifier C<{,n}>. That's interpreted as a literal string.
 
 =head2 EXTENDED CONSTRUCTS
 
index a6ad210..f9a4351 100644 (file)
@@ -734,7 +734,7 @@ match).
 Closely associated with the matching variables C<$1>, C<$2>, ... are
 the I<backreferences> C<\1>, C<\2>,...  Backreferences are simply
 matching variables that can be used I<inside> a regexp.  This is a
-really nice feature -- what matches later in a regexp is made to depend on
+really nice feature; what matches later in a regexp is made to depend on
 what matched earlier in the regexp.  Suppose we wanted to look
 for doubled words in a text, like 'the the'.  The following regexp finds
 all 3-letter doubles with a space in between:
@@ -787,10 +787,10 @@ tempted to use it as a part of some other pattern:
         print "bad line: '$line'\n";
     }
 
-But this doesn't match -- at least not the way one might expect. Only
+But this doesn't match, at least not the way one might expect. Only
 after inserting the interpolated C<$a99a> and looking at the resulting
 full text of the regexp is it obvious that the backreferences have
-backfired -- the subexpression C<(\w+)> has snatched number 1 and
+backfired. The subexpression C<(\w+)> has snatched number 1 and
 demoted the groups in C<$a99a> by one rank. This can be avoided by
 using relative backreferences:
 
@@ -1059,7 +1059,7 @@ satisfied.
 
 =back
 
-As we have seen above, Principle 0 overrides the others -- the regexp
+As we have seen above, Principle 0 overrides the others. The regexp
 will be matched as early as possible, with the other principles
 determining how the regexp matches at that earliest character
 position.
@@ -2487,8 +2487,8 @@ example:
                                             # but _does_ print
 
 Hmm. What happened here? If you've been following along, you know that
-the above pattern should be effectively (almost) the same as the last one --
-enclosing the d in a character class isn't going to change what it
+the above pattern should be effectively (almost) the same as the last one;
+enclosing the C<d> in a character class isn't going to change what it
 matches. So why does the first not print while the second one does?
 
 The answer lies in the optimizations the regex engine makes. In the first
index bc9d9bc..fb886b8 100644 (file)
@@ -1280,7 +1280,7 @@ See L<perlipc/"Deferred Signals (Safe Signals)">.
 X<PERL_UNICODE>
 
 Equivalent to the B<-C> command-line switch.  Note that this is not
-a boolean variable-- setting this to C<"1"> is not the right way to
+a boolean variable. Setting this to C<"1"> is not the right way to
 "enable Unicode" (whatever that would mean).  You can use C<"0"> to
 "disable Unicode", though (or alternatively unset PERL_UNICODE in
 your shell before starting Perl).  See the description of the C<-C>
index 63dcb84..6468aa8 100644 (file)
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ looking for implementation details you're going to be either
 disappointed or confused.  Possibly both.
 
 This is not to say that Perl threads are completely different from
-everything that's ever come before -- they're not.  Perl's threading
+everything that's ever come before. They're not.  Perl's threading
 model owes a lot to other thread models, especially POSIX.  Just as
 Perl is not C, though, Perl threads are not POSIX threads.  So if you
 find yourself looking for mutexes, or thread priorities, it's time to
@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@ make threaded programming easier.
 
 =head2 Basic Thread Support
 
-Thread support is a Perl compile-time option -- it's something that's
+Thread support is a Perl compile-time option. It's something that's
 turned on or off when Perl is built at your site, rather than when
 your programs are compiled. If your Perl wasn't compiled with thread
 support enabled, then any attempt to use threads will fail.
@@ -1003,7 +1003,7 @@ all the variables and data of the parent thread has to be taken. Thus,
 thread creation can be quite expensive, both in terms of memory usage and
 time spent in creation. The ideal way to reduce these costs is to have a
 relatively short number of long-lived threads, all created fairly early
-on -- before the base thread has accumulated too much data. Of course, this
+on (before the base thread has accumulated too much data). Of course, this
 may not always be possible, so compromises have to be made. However, after
 a thread has been created, its performance and extra memory usage should
 be little different than ordinary code.
@@ -1049,9 +1049,8 @@ Whether various library calls are thread-safe is outside the control
 of Perl.  Calls often suffering from not being thread-safe include:
 C<localtime()>, C<gmtime()>,  functions fetching user, group and
 network information (such as C<getgrent()>, C<gethostent()>,
-C<getnetent()> and so on), C<readdir()>,
-C<rand()>, and C<srand()> -- in general, calls that depend on some global
-external state.
+C<getnetent()> and so on), C<readdir()>, C<rand()>, and C<srand()>. In
+general, calls that depend on some global external state.
 
 If the system Perl is compiled in has thread-safe variants of such
 calls, they will be used.  Beyond that, Perl is at the mercy of
index 0323e32..370f644 100644 (file)
@@ -134,8 +134,8 @@ X<STORE>
 
 This method will be triggered every time the tied variable is set
 (assigned).  Beyond its self reference, it also expects one (and only one)
-argument--the new value the user is trying to assign. Don't worry about
-returning a value from STORE -- the semantic of assignment returning the
+argumentthe new value the user is trying to assign. Don't worry about
+returning a value from STORE; the semantic of assignment returning the
 assigned value is implemented with FETCH.
 
     sub STORE {
@@ -1078,7 +1078,7 @@ This is the output when it is executed:
 So far so good.  Those of you who have been paying attention will have
 spotted that the tied object hasn't been used so far.  So lets add an
 extra method to the Remember class to allow comments to be included in
-the file -- say, something like this:
+the file; say, something like this:
 
     sub comment {
         my $self = shift;
index 5180306..0d8648b 100644 (file)
@@ -797,7 +797,7 @@ to do that.  There's a bit of package data used in the constructor,
 but the reference to this is stored on the object itself and all other
 methods access package data via that reference, so we should be ok.
 
-What do we mean by the Person::new() function -- isn't that actually
+What do we mean by the Person::new() function? Isn't that actually
 a method?  Well, in principle, yes.  A method is just a function that
 expects as its first argument a class name (package) or object
 (blessed reference).   Person::new() is the function that both the
index 50a2843..042e421 100644 (file)
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ To indicate that Perl source itself is in UTF-8, use C<use utf8;>.
 The regular expression compiler produces polymorphic opcodes.  That is,
 the pattern adapts to the data and automatically switches to the Unicode
 character scheme when presented with data that is internally encoded in
-UTF-8 -- or instead uses a traditional byte scheme when presented with
+UTF-8, or instead uses a traditional byte scheme when presented with
 byte data.
 
 =item C<use utf8> still needed to enable UTF-8/UTF-EBCDIC in scripts
@@ -857,7 +857,7 @@ two (or more) classes.
     END
     }
 
-It's important to remember not to use "&" for the first set -- that
+It's important to remember not to use "&" for the first set; that
 would be intersecting with nothing (resulting in an empty set).
 
 =head2 User-Defined Case Mappings
index 6d11bb7..24f1fb2 100644 (file)
@@ -155,8 +155,8 @@ character set.  Otherwise, it uses UTF-8.
 
 A user of Perl does not normally need to know nor care how Perl
 happens to encode its internal strings, but it becomes relevant when
-outputting Unicode strings to a stream without a PerlIO layer -- one with
-the "default" encoding.  In such a case, the raw bytes used internally
+outputting Unicode strings to a stream without a PerlIO layer (one with
+the "default" encoding).  In such a case, the raw bytes used internally
 (the native character set or UTF-8, as appropriate for each string)
 will be used, and a "Wide character" warning will be issued if those
 strings contain a character beyond 0x00FF.
index 5ad24d8..5f773bb 100644 (file)
@@ -1945,7 +1945,7 @@ and the module version number.
 
 =item typedef my_cxt_t
 
-This struct typedef I<must> always be called C<my_cxt_t> -- the other
+This struct typedef I<must> always be called C<my_cxt_t>. The other
 C<CXT*> macros assume the existence of the C<my_cxt_t> typedef name.
 
 Declare a typedef named C<my_cxt_t> that is a structure that contains
@@ -1964,7 +1964,7 @@ of C<my_cxt_t>.
 
 The MY_CXT_INIT macro initialises storage for the C<my_cxt_t> struct.
 
-It I<must> be called exactly once -- typically in a BOOT: section. If you
+It I<must> be called exactly once, typically in a BOOT: section. If you
 are maintaining multiple interpreters, it should be called once in each
 interpreter instance, except for interpreters cloned from existing ones.
 (But see C<MY_CXT_CLONE> below.)
index 090b14a..62bef3b 100644 (file)
@@ -865,7 +865,7 @@ However, to help ease understanding, it is suggested that you place a "&"
 next to the variable name and away from the variable type), and place a
 "*" near the variable type, but away from the variable name (as in the
 call to foo above).  By doing so, it is easy to understand exactly what
-will be passed to the C function -- it will be whatever is in the "last
+will be passed to the C function; it will be whatever is in the "last
 column".
 
 You should take great pains to try to pass the function the type of variable