This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Typo nits from Wolfgang Laun.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Thu, 4 Apr 2002 13:57:41 +0000 (13:57 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Thu, 4 Apr 2002 13:57:41 +0000 (13:57 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@15729

lib/Test/Harness.pm
lib/Test/More.pm
lib/Test/Simple.pm

index e1d5154..0dd0f28 100644 (file)
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ test program.
 =item B<'1..M'>
 
 This header tells how many tests there will be.  It should be the
-first line output by your test program (but its okay if its preceded
+first line output by your test program (but it is okay if it is preceded
 by comments).
 
 In certain instanced, you may not know how many tests you will
@@ -1185,7 +1185,7 @@ portable because $^X is not consistent for shebang scripts across
 platforms. This is no problem when Test::Harness is run with an
 absolute path to the perl binary or when $^X can be found in the path.
 
-HARNESS_COMPILE_TEST currently assumes its run from the Perl source
+HARNESS_COMPILE_TEST currently assumes it is run from the Perl source
 directory.
 
 =cut
index 5cd8901..c335187 100644 (file)
@@ -645,7 +645,7 @@ C<use_ok> and C<require_ok>.
    BEGIN { use_ok($module, @imports); }
 
 These simply use the given $module and test to make sure the load
-happened ok.  Its recommended that you run use_ok() inside a BEGIN
+happened ok.  It is recommended that you run use_ok() inside a BEGIN
 block so its functions are exported at compile-time and prototypes are
 properly honored.
 
@@ -764,12 +764,12 @@ easiest way to illustrate:
 
 If pigs cannot fly, the whole block of tests will be skipped
 completely.  Test::More will output special ok's which Test::Harness
-interprets as skipped tests.  Its important to include $how_many tests
+interprets as skipped tests.  It is important to include $how_many tests
 are in the block so the total number of tests comes out right (unless
 you're using C<no_plan>, in which case you can leave $how_many off if
 you like).
 
-Its perfectly safe to nest SKIP blocks.
+It is perfectly safe to nest SKIP blocks.
 
 Tests are skipped when you B<never> expect them to B<ever> pass.  Like
 an optional module is not installed or the operating system doesn't
@@ -849,7 +849,7 @@ When the block is empty, delete it.
         ...normal testing code...
     }
 
-With todo tests, its best to have the tests actually run.  That way
+With todo tests, it is best to have the tests actually run.  That way
 you'll know when they start passing.  Sometimes this isn't possible.
 Often a failing test will cause the whole program to die or hang, even
 inside an C<eval BLOCK> with and using C<alarm>.  In these extreme
@@ -1181,7 +1181,7 @@ magic side-effects are kept to a minimum.  WYSIWYG.
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
 L<Test::Simple> if all this confuses you and you just want to write
-some tests.  You can upgrade to Test::More later (its forward
+some tests.  You can upgrade to Test::More later (it is forward
 compatible).
 
 L<Test::Differences> for more ways to test complex data structures.
index f0b45c0..1f50036 100644 (file)
@@ -61,8 +61,8 @@ You must have a plan.
   ok( $foo eq $bar, $name );
   ok( $foo eq $bar );
 
-ok() is given an expression (in this case C<$foo eq $bar>).  If its
-true, the test passed.  If its false, it didn't.  That's about it.
+ok() is given an expression (in this case C<$foo eq $bar>).  If it is
+true, the test passed.  If it is false, it didn't.  That's about it.
 
 ok() prints out either "ok" or "not ok" along with a test number (it
 keeps track of that for you).
@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@ keeps track of that for you).
 If you provide a $name, that will be printed along with the "ok/not
 ok" to make it easier to find your test when if fails (just search for
 the name).  It also makes it easier for the next guy to understand
-what your test is for.  Its highly recommended you use test names.
+what your test is for.  It is highly recommended you use test names.
 
 All tests are run in scalar context.  So this:
 
@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@ So the exit codes are...
 If you fail more than 254 tests, it will be reported as 254.
 
 This module is by no means trying to be a complete testing system.
-Its just to get you started.  Once you're off the ground its
+It's just to get you started.  Once you're off the ground it is
 recommended you look at L<Test::More>.