This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Add support for tied filehandles.
authorPerl 5 Porters <perl5-porters@africa.nicoh.com>
Sun, 25 Aug 1996 00:01:52 +0000 (00:01 +0000)
committerAndy Dougherty <doughera@lafcol.lafayette.edu>
Sun, 25 Aug 1996 00:01:52 +0000 (00:01 +0000)
ext/Opcode/Opcode.xs
pod/perltie.pod
t/lib/opcode.t
t/op/misc.t

index 5d9d63f..1fd2c6b 100644 (file)
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ op_names_init()
     while(i-- > 0)
        bitmap[i] = 0xFF;
     /* Take care to set the right number of bits in the last byte */
-    bitmap[len-1] = ~(~0 << (maxo & 0x07));
+    bitmap[len-1] = (maxo & 0x07) ? ~(~0 << (maxo & 0x07)) : 0xFF;
     put_op_bitspec(":all",0, opset_all); /* don't mortalise */
 }
 
index 658425e..c5d3686 100644 (file)
@@ -33,13 +33,14 @@ In the tie() call, C<VARIABLE> is the name of the variable to be
 enchanted.  C<CLASSNAME> is the name of a class implementing objects of
 the correct type.  Any additional arguments in the C<LIST> are passed to
 the appropriate constructor method for that class--meaning TIESCALAR(),
-TIEARRAY(), or TIEHASH().  (Typically these are arguments such as might be
-passed to the dbminit() function of C.) The object returned by the "new"
-method is also returned by the tie() function, which would be useful if
-you wanted to access other methods in C<CLASSNAME>. (You don't actually
-have to return a reference to a right "type" (e.g. HASH or C<CLASSNAME>)
-so long as it's a properly blessed object.)  You can also retrieve
-a reference to the underlying object using the tied() function.
+TIEARRAY(), TIEHASH() or TIEHANDLE().  (Typically these are arguments
+such as might be passed to the dbminit() function of C.) The object
+returned by the "new" method is also returned by the tie() function,
+which would be useful if you wanted to access other methods in
+C<CLASSNAME>. (You don't actually have to return a reference to a right
+"type" (e.g. HASH or C<CLASSNAME>) so long as it's a properly blessed
+object.)  You can also retrieve a reference to the underlying object
+using the tied() function.
 
 Unlike dbmopen(), the tie() function will not C<use> or C<require> a module
 for you--you need to do that explicitly yourself.
@@ -159,7 +160,7 @@ argument--the new value the user is trying to assign.
 =item DESTROY this
 
 This method will be triggered when the tied variable needs to be destructed.
-As with other object classes, such a method is seldom ncessary, since Perl
+As with other object classes, such a method is seldom necessary, since Perl
 deallocates its moribund object's memory for you automatically--this isn't
 C++, you know.  We'll use a DESTROY method here for debugging purposes only.
 
@@ -608,7 +609,55 @@ use the each() function to iterate over such.  Example:
 
 =head2 Tying FileHandles
 
-This isn't implemented yet.  Sorry; maybe someday.
+This is partially implemeted now.
+
+A class implementing a tied scalar should define the folowing methods:
+TIEHANDLE, PRINT, and possibly DESTROY.
+
+In future READLINE, EOF and possibly others will be added.
+
+It is especially useful when perl is embedded in some other program,
+where output to STDOUT and STDERR may have to be redirected in some
+special way. See nvi and the Apache module for examples.
+
+In our example we're going to create a shouting handle.
+
+    package Shout;
+
+=over
+
+=item TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
+
+This is the constructor for the class.  That means it is expected to
+return a blessed reference of some sort. The refence can be used to
+hold some internal information. We won't use it in out example.
+
+    sub TIEHANDLE { print "<shout>\n"; bless [], shift }
+
+=item PRINT this, LIST
+
+This method will be triggered every time the tied handle is printed to.
+Beyond its self refence it also expects the list that was passed to
+the print function.
+
+    sub PRINT { shift; for (@_) { print uc($_) } }
+
+=item DESTROY this
+
+As with the other types of ties, this method will be called when the
+tied handle is about to be destroyed. This is useful for debugging and
+possibly cleaning up.
+
+    sub DESTROY { print "</shout>\n" }
+
+=back
+
+Here's how to use our little example:
+
+    tie(*FOO,'Shout');
+    print FOO "hello\n";
+    $a = 4; $b = 6;
+    print FOO $a, " plus ", $b, " equals ", $a + $b, "\n";
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
@@ -632,3 +681,5 @@ source code to MLDBM.
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
 Tom Christiansen
+
+TIEHANDLE by Sven Verdoolaege <skimo@dns.ufsia.ac.be>
index e171aca..a785fce 100755 (executable)
@@ -77,7 +77,7 @@ print @o2 == opcodes-3 ? "ok $t\n" : "not ok $t\n"; $t++;
 
 die $t unless $t == 16;
 print opmask() eq empty_opset() ? "ok $t\n" : "not ok $t\n"; $t++;     # work
-print length opmask() == int(opcodes()/8)+1 ? "ok $t\n" : "not ok $t\n"; $t++;
+print length opmask() == int((opcodes()+7)/8) ? "ok $t\n" : "not ok $t\n"; $t++;
 
 # --- verify_opset
 
index 8fdd11a..3b88a0a 100755 (executable)
@@ -169,3 +169,25 @@ BEGIN { undef = 0 }
 EXPECT
 Modification of a read-only value attempted at - line 1.
 BEGIN failed--compilation aborted at - line 1.
+########
+{
+    package foo;
+    sub PRINT {
+        shift;
+        print join(' ', reverse @_)."\n";
+    }
+    sub TIEHANDLE {
+        bless {}, shift;
+    }
+    sub DESTROY {
+       print "and destroyed as well\n";
+    }
+}
+{
+    local(*FOO);
+    tie(*FOO,'foo');
+    print FOO "sentence.", "reversed", "a", "is", "This";
+}
+EXPECT
+This is a reversed sentence.
+and destroyed as well