This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Some notes about porting issues.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Sun, 13 Dec 1998 12:32:42 +0000 (12:32 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Sun, 13 Dec 1998 12:32:42 +0000 (12:32 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/cfgperl@2474

Porting/pumpkin.pod

index f62f753..db29b75 100644 (file)
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ No one was allowed to make backups unless they had the "backup pumpkin".
 
 The name has stuck.
 
-=head1 Philosophical Issues in Patching Perl
+=head1 Philosophical Issues in Patching and Porting Perl
 
 There are no absolute rules, but there are some general guidelines I
 have tried to follow as I apply patches to the perl sources.
@@ -174,6 +174,16 @@ generalized the process of building libperl so that NeXT and SVR4 users
 could still get their work done, but others could build a shared
 libperl if they wanted to as well.
 
+Contain your changes carefully.  Assume nothing about other operating
+systems, not even closely related ones.  Your changes must not affect
+other platforms.
+
+Spy shamelessly on how similar patching or porting issues have been
+settled elsewhere.
+
+If feasible, try to keep filenames 8.3-compliant to humor those poor
+souls that get joy from running Perl under such dire limitations.
+
 =head2 Seek consensus on major changes
 
 If you are making big changes, don't do it in secret.  Discuss the
@@ -196,6 +206,40 @@ that the machine-specific #ifdef's may not be valid across major
 releases of the operating system.  Further, the feature-specific tests
 may help out folks on another platform who have the same problem.
 
+=head2 Machine-specific files
+
+If you have many machine-specific #defines or #includes, consider
+creating an "osish.h" (os2ish.h, vmsish.h, and so on) and including
+that in perl.h.  If you have several machine-specific files (function
+emulations, function stubs, build utility wrappers) you may create a
+separate subdirectory (djgpp, win32) and put the files in there.
+Remember to update C<MANIFEST>.
+
+=head2 Machine-specific hints
+
+There are two kinds of hints: hints for building Perl and hints for
+extensions.   The former live in the C<hints> subdirectory, the latter
+in C<ext/*/hints> subdirectories.
+
+The top level hints are Bourne-shell scripts that set, modify and
+unset appropriate Configure variables, based on the Configure command
+line options and possibly existing config.sh and Policy.sh files from
+previous Configure runs.
+
+The extension hints are written Perl (by the time they are used
+miniperl has been built) and control the building of their respective
+extensions.  They can be used to for example manipulate compilation
+and linking flags.
+
+=head2 Machine-specific tests
+
+Some of the tests in C<t> subdirectory assume machine-specific things
+like existence of certain functions, something about filesystem
+semantics, certain external utilities and their error messages.  Use
+the C<$^O> and the C<Config> module (which contains the results of the
+Configure run, in effect the C<config.sh> converted to Perl) to either
+skip or customize the tests for your platform.
+
 =head2 Allow for lots of testing
 
 We should never release a main version without testing it as a
@@ -219,11 +263,11 @@ patch these directly; patch the data files instead.
 
 F<Configure> and F<config_h.SH> are also automatically generated by
 B<metaconfig>.  In general, you should patch the metaconfig units
-instead of patching these files directly.  However, very minor changes to
-F<Configure> may be made in between major sync-ups with the metaconfig
-units, which tends to be complicated operations.  But be careful, this
-can quickly spiral out of control.  Running metaconfig is not really
-hard.
+instead of patching these files directly.  However, very minor changes
+to F<Configure> may be made in between major sync-ups with the
+metaconfig units, which tends to be complicated operations.  But be
+careful, this can quickly spiral out of control.  Running metaconfig
+is not really hard.
 
 Finally, the sample files in the F<Porting/> subdirectory are
 generated automatically by the script F<U/mksample> included