This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
spellings
authorMarcel Grunauer <marcel@codewerk.com>
Tue, 29 Aug 2000 01:19:59 +0000 (03:19 +0200)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Mon, 28 Aug 2000 23:33:39 +0000 (23:33 +0000)
Message-Id: <200008282319.BAA29862@gandalf.local>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@6872

README.os390
pod/perl5004delta.pod
pod/perldebtut.pod
pod/perlebcdic.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perlthrtut.pod
pod/perlutil.pod

index 1821846..571d027 100644 (file)
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ character sets are different.  Perl builtin functions that may behave
 differently under EBCDIC are mentioned in the perlport.pod document.
 
 OpenEdition (UNIX System Services) does not (yet) support the #! means 
-of script invokation.
+of script invocation.
 See:
 
     head `whence perldoc`
index 85a8f96..8cec3ab 100644 (file)
@@ -810,7 +810,7 @@ builtin operations.
 
 When C<use locale> is in effect, the current LC_CTYPE locale is used
 for regular expressions and case mapping; LC_COLLATE for string
-ordering; and LC_NUMERIC for numeric formating in printf and sprintf
+ordering; and LC_NUMERIC for numeric formatting in printf and sprintf
 (but B<not> in print).  LC_NUMERIC is always used in write, since
 lexical scoping of formats is problematic at best.
 
index 93fa69d..28ced7d 100644 (file)
@@ -327,7 +327,7 @@ our expected output:
 
 While we're here, take a closer look at the 'B<x>' command, it's really useful
 and will merrily dump out nested references, complete objects, partial objects
-- justabout whatever you throw at it:
+- just about whatever you throw at it:
 
 Let's make a quick object and x-plode it, first we'll start the the debugger:
 it wants some form of input from STDIN, so we give it something non-commital,
@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ expected output.  This is what it does:
        
 Not very consistent!  We'll set a breakpoint in the code manually and run it
 under the debugger to see what's going on.  A breakpoint is a flag, to which
-the debugger will run without interuption, when it reaches the breakpoint, it
+the debugger will run without interruption, when it reaches the breakpoint, it
 will stop execution and offer a prompt for further interaction.  In normal
 use, these debugger commands are completely ignored, and they are safe - if a
 little messy, to leave in production code.
index f27a8de..619cb9b 100644 (file)
@@ -992,7 +992,7 @@ ISSN 1523-0309; Multilingual Computing Inc. Sandpoint ID, USA.
 
 Peter Prymmer E<lt>pvhp@best.comE<gt> wrote this in 1999 and 2000 
 with CCSID 0819 and 0037 help from Chris Leach and 
-Andre' Pirard E<lt>A.Pirard@ulg.ac.beE<gt> as well as POSIX-BC 
+AndrE<eacute> Pirard E<lt>A.Pirard@ulg.ac.beE<gt> as well as POSIX-BC 
 help from Thomas Dorner E<lt>Thomas.Dorner@start.deE<gt>.
 Thanks also to Philip Newton and Vickie Cooper.  Trademarks, registered 
 trademarks, service marks and registered service marks used in this 
index 0235c37..5f23b7e 100644 (file)
@@ -2819,7 +2819,7 @@ otherwise it's necessary to protect any leading and trailing whitespace:
     $file =~ s#^(\s)#./$1#;
     open(FOO, "< $file\0");
 
-(this may not work on some bizzare filesystems).  One should
+(this may not work on some bizarre filesystems).  One should
 conscientiously choose between the I<magic> and 3-arguments form
 of open():
 
index 74b901d..bfdf9fa 100644 (file)
@@ -1994,7 +1994,7 @@ whether the current character in a string is valid UTF8.
 As mentioned above, UTF8 uses a variable number of bytes to store a
 character. Characters with values 1...128 are stored in one byte, just
 like good ol' ASCII. Character 129 is stored as C<v194.129>; this
-contines up to character 191, which is C<v194.191>. Now we've run out of
+continues up to character 191, which is C<v194.191>. Now we've run out of
 bits (191 is binary C<10111111>) so we move on; 192 is C<v195.128>. And
 so it goes on, moving to three bytes at character 2048.
 
index 47556a5..6a3d158 100644 (file)
@@ -1304,7 +1304,7 @@ with TCP, you'd have to use a different socket handle for each host.
 Note that this example does not include any retries and may consequently
 fail to contact a reachable host. The most prominent reason for this
 is congestion of the queues on the sending host if the number of
-list of hosts to contact is sufficietly large.
+list of hosts to contact is sufficiently large.
 
 =head1 SysV IPC
 
index 3a1cf86..0b7092b 100644 (file)
@@ -991,7 +991,7 @@ the explanation is much longer than the program.
 
 A complete thread tutorial could fill a book (and has, many times),
 but this should get you well on your way.  The final authority on how
-Perl's threads behave is the documention bundled with the Perl
+Perl's threads behave is the documentation bundled with the Perl
 distribution, but with what we've covered in this article, you should
 be well on your way to becoming a threaded Perl expert.
 
index 1b2c178..7b56a17 100644 (file)
@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ piped through your favourite pager.
 
 =item L<pod2html|pod2html> and L<pod2latex|pod2latex>
 
-As well as these two, there are two other convertors: F<pod2html> will
+As well as these two, there are two other converters: F<pod2html> will
 produce HTML pages from POD, and F<pod2latex>, which produces LaTeX
 files.