This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
perldiag: s/about where/whereabouts/
authorFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Thu, 6 Dec 2012 21:26:01 +0000 (13:26 -0800)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sun, 9 Dec 2012 02:46:51 +0000 (18:46 -0800)
Every time I see that ‘about where’ I wonder why it sounds so funny.
It just dawned on me that we should just use the word ‘whereabouts’,
which fits perfectly in this context, and doesn’t sound as though it
needs a rewrite.

pod/perldiag.pod

index 2a0e838..5f0045b 100644 (file)
@@ -1622,7 +1622,7 @@ it's loaded, etc.
 most likely cause of this error is that you left out a parenthesis inside
 of the C<....> part.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item %s defines neither package nor VERSION--version check failed
@@ -1807,7 +1807,7 @@ pragma is in effect.  See L<perlre/(?{ code })>.
 (F) You used a pattern that nested too many EVAL calls without consuming
 any text.  Restructure the pattern so that text is consumed.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Excessively long <> operator
@@ -1883,7 +1883,7 @@ queue of such routines has been prematurely ended.
 (W regexp) A character class range must start and end at a literal
 character, not another character class like C<\d> or C<[:alpha:]>.  The "-"
 in your false range is interpreted as a literal "-".  Consider quoting the
-"-", "\-".  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+"-", "\-".  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Fatal VMS error (status=%d) at %s, line %d
@@ -2242,7 +2242,7 @@ encoding is limited to code points no larger than 2147483647 (0x7FFFFFFF).
 text.  You should check the pattern to ensure that recursive patterns
 either consume text or fail.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Initialization of state variables in list context currently forbidden
@@ -2325,7 +2325,7 @@ to use some odd mathematical operation as a version, like 100/9.
 =item Internal disaster in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (P) Something went badly wrong in the regular expression parser.
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Internal inconsistency in tracking vforks
@@ -2340,7 +2340,7 @@ terminate the Perl script and execute the specified command.
 =item Internal urp in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (P) Something went badly awry in the regular expression parser.  The
-<-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+<-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item %s (...) interpreted as function
@@ -2382,7 +2382,7 @@ L<perlfunc/sprintf>.
 didn't correspond to a single character through the conversion
 from the encoding specified by the encoding pragma.
 The escape was replaced with REPLACEMENT CHARACTER (U+FFFD) instead.
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 escape was discovered.
 
 =item Invalid hexadecimal number in \N{U+...}
@@ -2424,7 +2424,7 @@ See also L<perlrun/B<-D>I<letters>>.
 (F) The range specified in a character class had a minimum character
 greater than the maximum character.  One possibility is that you forgot the
 C<{}> from your ending C<\x{}> - C<\x> without the curly braces can go only
-up to C<ff>.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+up to C<ff>.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Invalid range "%s" in transliteration operator
@@ -2738,7 +2738,7 @@ doing it Perl met a malformed Unicode surrogate.
 
 (W regexp) The pattern you've specified would be an infinite loop if the
 regular expression engine didn't specifically check for that.  The <-- HERE
-shows in the regular expression about where the problem was discovered.
+shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was discovered.
 See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Maximal count of pending signals (%u) exceeded
@@ -3020,8 +3020,8 @@ greater than or equal to zero.
 =item Nested quantifiers in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) You can't quantify a quantifier without intervening parentheses.
-So things like ** or +* or ?* are illegal.  The <-- HERE shows in the
-regular expression about where the problem was discovered.
+So things like ** or +* or ?* are illegal.  The <-- HERE shows
+whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was discovered.
 
 Note that the minimal matching quantifiers, C<*?>, C<+?>, and
 C<??> appear to be nested quantifiers, but aren't.  See L<perlre>.
@@ -3772,7 +3772,7 @@ a detectable way.
 consuming any text.  Restructure the pattern so text is consumed before
 the nesting limit is exceeded.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Parentheses missing around "%s" list
@@ -3881,7 +3881,7 @@ fine from VMS' perspective, it's probably not what you intended.
 =item POSIX class [:%s:] unknown in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) The class in the character class [: :] syntax is unknown.  The <-- HERE
-shows in the regular expression about where the problem was discovered.
+shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was discovered.
 Note that the POSIX character classes do B<not> have the C<is> prefix
 the corresponding C interfaces have: in other words, it's C<[[:print:]]>,
 not C<isprint>.  See L<perlre>.
@@ -3896,9 +3896,9 @@ the BSD version, which takes a pid.
 (W regexp) The character class constructs [: :], [= =], and [. .]  go
 I<inside> character classes, the [] are part of the construct, for example:
 /[012[:alpha:]345]/.  Note that [= =] and [. .] are not currently
-implemented; they are simply placeholders for future extensions and will
-cause fatal errors.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about
-where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+implemented; they are simply placeholders for future extensions and
+will cause fatal errors.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular
+expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item POSIX syntax [. .] is reserved for future extensions in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
@@ -3906,7 +3906,7 @@ where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 with "[." and ending with ".]" is reserved for future extensions.  If you
 need to represent those character sequences inside a regular expression
 character class, just quote the square brackets with the backslash: "\[."
-and ".\]".  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+and ".\]".  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item POSIX syntax [= =] is reserved for future extensions in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
@@ -3915,7 +3915,7 @@ problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 with "[=" and ending with "=]" is reserved for future extensions.  If you
 need to represent those character sequences inside a regular expression
 character class, just quote the square brackets with the backslash: "\[="
-and "=\]".  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+and "=\]".  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list
@@ -4082,14 +4082,14 @@ change when upper cased.
 =item Quantifier follows nothing in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) You started a regular expression with a quantifier.  Backslash it if
-you meant it literally.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression
-about where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+you meant it literally.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular
+expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Quantifier in {,} bigger than %d in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) There is currently a limit to the size of the min and max values of
-the {min,max} construct.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression
-about where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+the {min,max} construct.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular
+expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Quantifier unexpected on zero-length expression; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
@@ -4099,7 +4099,7 @@ quantifier inside the assertion instead.  For example, the way to match
 "abc" provided that it is followed by three repetitions of "xyz" is
 C</abc(?=(?:xyz){3})/>, not C</abc(?=xyz){3}/>.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Quantifier {n,m} with n > m can't match in regex
@@ -4200,7 +4200,7 @@ not at least seven sets of capturing parentheses in the expression.  If
 you wanted to have the character with ordinal 7 inserted into the regular
 expression, prepend zeroes to make it three digits long: C<\007>
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Reference to nonexistent named group in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
@@ -4210,7 +4210,7 @@ expression, but there is no corresponding named capturing parentheses
 such as C<(?'NAME'...)> or C<< (?<NAME>...) >>.  Check if the name has been
 spelled correctly both in the backreference and the declaration.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item Reference to nonexistent or unclosed group in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
@@ -4219,7 +4219,7 @@ discovered.
 are not at least seven sets of closed capturing parentheses in the
 expression before where the C<\g{-7}> was located.
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.
 
 =item regexp memory corruption
@@ -4374,19 +4374,19 @@ before now.  Check your control flow.
 =item Sequence (? incomplete in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) A regular expression ended with an incomplete extension (?.  The
-<-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+<-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Sequence (?%s...) not implemented in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) A proposed regular expression extension has the character reserved
-but has not yet been written.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular
-expression about where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+but has not yet been written.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the
+regular expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Sequence (?%s...) not recognized in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) You used a regular expression extension that doesn't make sense.  The
-<-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+<-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.  This happens when using the C<(?^...)> construct to tell
 Perl to use the default regular expression modifiers, and you
 redundantly specify a default modifier.  For other
@@ -4674,14 +4674,14 @@ it in clustering parentheses:
 
     (?(condition)(?:this|that|other)|else-clause)
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem
 was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Switch condition not recognized in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
 
 (F) If the argument to the (?(...)if-clause|else-clause) construct is
-a number, it can be only a number.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular
-expression about where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+a number, it can be only a number.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in
+the regular expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item switching effective %s is not implemented
 
@@ -5142,7 +5142,7 @@ is not known.  The condition must be one of the following:
  (R&NAME)           true if directly inside named capture
  (DEFINE)           always false; for defining named subpatterns
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
 discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Unknown Unicode option letter '%c'
@@ -5174,7 +5174,7 @@ module first.
 
 (F) The brackets around a character class must match.  If you wish to
 include a closing bracket in a character class, backslash it or put it
-first.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+first.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Unmatched ( in regex; marked by <-- HERE in m/%s/
@@ -5183,8 +5183,8 @@ problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 (F) Unbackslashed parentheses must always be balanced in regular
 expressions.  If you're a vi user, the % key is valuable for finding
-the matching parenthesis.  The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression
-about where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+the matching parenthesis.  The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the
+regular expression the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Unmatched right %s bracket
 
@@ -5211,7 +5211,7 @@ to run a compressed script, a binary program, or a directory as a Perl program.
 (W regexp) You used a backslash-character combination which is not
 recognized by Perl inside character classes.  The character was
 understood literally, but this may change in a future version of Perl.
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the
 escape was discovered.
 
 =item Unrecognized escape \%c passed through
@@ -5224,8 +5224,8 @@ change in a future version of Perl.
 
 (W regexp) You used a backslash-character combination which is not
 recognized by Perl.  The character(s) were understood literally, but
-this may change in a future version of Perl.  The <-- HERE shows in
-the regular expression about where the escape was discovered.
+this may change in a future version of Perl.  The <-- HERE shows
+whereabouts in the regular expression the escape was discovered.
 
 =item Unrecognized signal name "%s"
 
@@ -5369,8 +5369,8 @@ must be written as
 
     if ($string =~ /$pattern/) { ... }
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about
-where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
+discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Useless localization of %s
 
@@ -5389,8 +5389,8 @@ must be written as
 
     if ($string =~ /$pattern/o) { ... }
 
-The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about
-where the problem was discovered.  See L<perlre>.
+The <-- HERE shows whereabouts in the regular expression the problem was
+discovered.  See L<perlre>.
 
 =item Useless use of /d modifier in transliteration operator