This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Fix bad pod links found by Test::Pod::LinkCheck
authorApocalypse <perl@0ne.us>
Wed, 16 Feb 2011 01:38:04 +0000 (18:38 -0700)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Wed, 16 Feb 2011 04:25:25 +0000 (20:25 -0800)
23 files changed:
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perldebguts.pod
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlembed.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfaq8.pod
pod/perlform.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlglossary.pod
pod/perlinterp.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlobj.pod
pod/perlperf.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlreapi.pod
pod/perlrun.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perlvar.pod
pod/perlvms.pod

index 03191b5..1b1cbf4 100644 (file)
@@ -862,8 +862,8 @@ C<use strict 'refs'> forbids such practice.
 Another way to create anonymous filehandles is with the Symbol
 module or with the IO::Handle module and its ilk.  These modules
 have the advantage of not hiding different types of the same name
-during the local().  See the bottom of L<perlfunc/open()> for an
-example.
+during the local().  See the bottom of L<perlfunc/"open FILEHANDLE">
+for an example.
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
index d6bffb1..e5970a3 100644 (file)
@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ after the debugger completes its own initialization.)
 After the rc file is read, the debugger reads the PERLDB_OPTS
 environment variable and uses it to set debugger options. The
 contents of this variable are treated as if they were the argument
-of an C<o ...> debugger command (q.v. in L<perldebug/Options>).
+of an C<o ...> debugger command (q.v. in L<perldebug/"Configurable Options">).
 
 =head3 Debugger Internal Variables
 
index 07aa302..8fbb231 100644 (file)
@@ -654,7 +654,7 @@ X<debugger option, dieLevel>
 Level of verbosity.  By default, the debugger leaves your exceptions
 and warnings alone, because altering them can break correctly running
 programs.  It will attempt to print a message when uncaught INT, BUS, or
-SEGV signals arrive.  (But see the mention of signals in L<BUGS> below.)
+SEGV signals arrive.  (But see the mention of signals in L</BUGS> below.)
 
 To disable this default safe mode, set these values to something higher
 than 0.  At a level of 1, you get backtraces upon receiving any kind
index 7a3b962..087f906 100644 (file)
@@ -2413,7 +2413,7 @@ an undefined value for the length. See L<perlfunc/pack>.
 =item Lexing code attempted to stuff non-Latin-1 character into Latin-1 input
 
 (F) An extension is attempting to insert text into the current parse
-(using L<lex_stuff_pvn_flags|perlapi/lex_stuff_pvn_flags> or similar), but tried to insert a character
+(using L<lex_stuff_pvn|perlapi/lex_stuff_pvn> or similar), but tried to insert a character
 that couldn't be part of the current input. This is an inherent pitfall
 of the stuffing mechanism, and one of the reasons to avoid it.  Where it
 is necessary to stuff, stuffing only plain ASCII is recommended.
index 1144e43..8edff17 100644 (file)
@@ -1109,8 +1109,8 @@ you will have to write the explicit full form
 
     Perl_warn(aTHX_ "%d bottles of beer on the wall", bottlecount);
 
-(See L<perlguts/Background and PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT for the explanation
-of the C<aTHX_>.> )  Hiding the short forms is very useful for avoiding
+(See L<perlguts/"Background and PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT"> for the explanation
+of the C<aTHX_>. )  Hiding the short forms is very useful for avoiding
 all sorts of nasty (C preprocessor or otherwise) conflicts with other
 software packages (Perl defines about 2400 APIs with these short names,
 take or leave few hundred, so there certainly is room for conflict.)
index 983825b..5d7a1e8 100644 (file)
@@ -633,8 +633,7 @@ Why do you want to do that? :-)
 
 If you want to override a predefined function, such as open(),
 then you'll have to import the new definition from a different
-module.  See L<perlsub/"Overriding Built-in Functions">.  There's
-also an example in L<perltoot/"Class::Template">.
+module.  See L<perlsub/"Overriding Built-in Functions">.
 
 If you want to overload a Perl operator, such as C<+> or C<**>,
 then you'll want to use the C<use overload> pragma, documented
index 99af392..0e9fcc5 100644 (file)
@@ -933,7 +933,7 @@ approach will suffice:
 
 =head2 How can I write expect in Perl?
 
-Once upon a time, there was a library called L<chat2.pl> (part of the
+Once upon a time, there was a library called F<chat2.pl> (part of the
 standard perl distribution), which never really got finished.  If you
 find it somewhere, I<don't use it>.  These days, your best bet is to
 look at the Expect module available from CPAN, which also requires two
index df0f0a1..6a6a83a 100644 (file)
@@ -393,7 +393,7 @@ by checking $FORMAT_LINES_LEFT before each write() and print the footer
 yourself if necessary.
 
 Here's another strategy: Open a pipe to yourself, using C<open(MYSELF, "|-")>
-(see L<perlfunc/open()>) and always write() to MYSELF instead of STDOUT.
+(see L<perlfunc/"open FILEHANDLE">) and always write() to MYSELF instead of STDOUT.
 Have your child process massage its STDIN to rearrange headers and footers
 however you like.  Not very convenient, but doable.
 
index 2047dd6..3ed689e 100644 (file)
@@ -1271,7 +1271,7 @@ C<die> raises an exception. Inside an C<eval> the error message is stuffed
 into C<$@> and the C<eval> is terminated with the undefined value.
 If the exception is outside of all enclosing C<eval>s, then the uncaught
 exception prints LIST to C<STDERR> and exits with a non-zero value. If you
-need to exit the process with a specific exit code, see L<exit>.
+need to exit the process with a specific exit code, see L</exit>.
 
 Equivalent examples:
 
@@ -1355,7 +1355,7 @@ You can arrange for a callback to be run just before the C<die>
 does its deed, by setting the C<$SIG{__DIE__}> hook.  The associated
 handler is called with the error text and can change the error
 message, if it sees fit, by calling C<die> again.  See
-L<perlvar/$SIG{expr}> for details on setting C<%SIG> entries, and
+L<perlvar/%SIG> for details on setting C<%SIG> entries, and
 L<"eval BLOCK"> for some examples.  Although this feature was 
 to be run only right before your program was to exit, this is not
 currently so: the C<$SIG{__DIE__}> hook is currently called
@@ -1401,9 +1401,9 @@ is just like
     eval `cat stat.pl`;
 
 except that it's more efficient and concise, keeps track of the current
-filename for error messages, searches the @INC directories, and updates
-C<%INC> if the file is found.  See L<perlvar/Predefined Names> for these
-variables.  It also differs in that code evaluated with C<do FILENAME>
+filename for error messages, searches the C<@INC> directories, and updates
+C<%INC> if the file is found.  See L<perlvar/@INC> and L<perlvar/%INC> for
+these variables.  It also differs in that code evaluated with C<do FILENAME>
 cannot see lexicals in the enclosing scope; C<eval STRING> does.  It's the
 same, however, in that it does reparse the file every time you call it,
 so you probably don't want to do this inside a loop.
@@ -2775,7 +2775,8 @@ respectively.
 =item Otherwise, If EXPR has the UTF8 flag set
 
 If the current package has a subroutine named C<ToLower>, it will be used to
-change the case (See L<perlunicode/User-Defined Case Mappings>.)
+change the case
+(See L<perlunicode/"User-Defined Case Mappings (for serious hackers only)">.)
 Otherwise Unicode semantics are used for the case change.
 
 =item Otherwise, if C<use locale> is in effect
@@ -3302,7 +3303,8 @@ replace dash (C<'-'>) with the command.
 See L<perlipc/"Using open() for IPC"> for more examples of this.
 (You are not allowed to C<open> to a command that pipes both in I<and>
 out, but see L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>, and
-L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication"> for alternatives.)
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process"> for
+alternatives.)
 
 In the form of pipe opens taking three or more arguments, if LIST is specified
 (extra arguments after the command name) then LIST becomes arguments
@@ -4342,7 +4344,8 @@ unless you are very careful.  In addition, note that Perl's pipes use
 IO buffering, so you may need to set C<$|> to flush your WRITEHANDLE
 after each command, depending on the application.
 
-See L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>, and L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication">
+See L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>, and
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process">
 for examples of such things.
 
 On systems that support a close-on-exec flag on files, that flag is set
@@ -7030,7 +7033,7 @@ The behavior is undefined if LENGTH is greater than the length of the
 file.
 
 The position in the file of FILEHANDLE is left unchanged.  You may want to
-call L<seek> before writing to the file.
+call L<seek|/"seek FILEHANDLE,POSITION,WHENCE"> before writing to the file.
 
 =item uc EXPR
 X<uc> X<uppercase> X<toupper>
index c4fb406..3a573c3 100644 (file)
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ the numbered variables (C<$1>, C<$2>, etc.) continue to refer to these
 same values, as long as the pattern was the last successful match of
 the current dynamic scope.  C<\g{-1}> can be used to refer to a group by
 relative rather than absolute position; and groups can be also be named, and
-referred to later by name rather than number.  See L<perlre/Capture Buffers>.
+referred to later by name rather than number.  See L<perlre/"Capture groups">.
 
 =item backtracking
 
@@ -894,7 +894,7 @@ will be called a "binary-only" distribution.
 
 =item (to be) dropped modules
 
-When Perl 5 was first released (see L<perlhistory>), several modules were
+When Perl 5 was first released (see L<perlhist>), several modules were
 included, which have now fallen out of common use.  It has been suggested
 that these modules should be removed, since the distribution became rather
 large, and the common criterion for new module additions is now limited to
@@ -2985,9 +2985,8 @@ L</argument> must be the last switch in a cluster.
 A program technique that lets you evaluate an L</expression> and then,
 based on the value of the expression, do a multiway branch to the
 appropriate piece of code for that value.  Also called a "case
-structure", named after the similar Pascal construct.  Most switch
-statements in Perl are spelled C<for>.  See L<perlsyn/Basic BLOCKs and
-Switch Statements>.
+structure", named after the similar Pascal construct.  See
+L<perlsyn/"Switch statements">.
 
 =item symbol
 
@@ -3155,7 +3154,7 @@ to build special tools.  Perl is sort of a machine shop.
 To turn one string representation into another by mapping each
 character of the source string to its corresponding character in the
 result string.  See
-L<perlop/trE<sol>SEARCHLISTE<sol>REPLACEMENTLISTE<sol>cds>.
+L<perlop/trE<sol>SEARCHLISTE<sol>REPLACEMENTLISTE<sol>cdsr>.
 
 =item trigger
 
index 5d16e8b..74a5e4e 100644 (file)
@@ -696,7 +696,7 @@ stack implements the C equivalent of, for example:
         ...
     }
 
-See L<perlguts/Localising Changes> for how to use the save stack.
+See L<perlguts/"Localizing Changes"> for how to use the save stack.
 
 =head1 MILLIONS OF MACROS
 
index 0bec423..45385e8 100644 (file)
@@ -866,7 +866,7 @@ using GNU libc and you can ignore C<LANGUAGE>.
 However, in the case you are using C<LANGUAGE>: it affects the
 language of informational, warning, and error messages output by
 commands (in other words, it's like C<LC_MESSAGES>) but it has higher
-priority than L<LC_ALL>.  Moreover, it's not a single value but
+priority than C<LC_ALL>.  Moreover, it's not a single value but
 instead a "path" (":"-separated list) of I<languages> (not locales).
 See the GNU C<gettext> library documentation for more information.
 
index 1a166a8..5266f19 100644 (file)
@@ -66,7 +66,7 @@ main, but we decided it was more useful for package writers to be able
 to use leading underscore to indicate private variables and method names.
 However, variables and functions named with a single C<_>, such as
 $_ and C<sub _>, are still forced into the package C<main>.  See also
-L<perlvar/"Technical Note on the Syntax of Variable Names">.
+L<perlvar/"The Syntax of Variable Names">.
 
 C<eval>ed strings are compiled in the package in which the eval() was
 compiled.  (Assignments to C<$SIG{}>, however, assume the signal
index fdecd84..850225f 100644 (file)
@@ -576,7 +576,7 @@ destructed.  Plain refs are only garbage-collected if the destruct level
 is greater than 0.  You can test the higher levels of global destruction
 by setting the PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL environment variable, presuming
 C<-DDEBUGGING> was enabled during perl build time.
-See L<perlhack/PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information.
+See L<perlhacktips/PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information.
 
 A more complete garbage collection strategy will be implemented
 at a future date.
index a934271..cac6eee 100644 (file)
@@ -567,7 +567,7 @@ to execute, C<if ( $debug ) { > and C<my $message = shift;>, for example.  The
 differences in the actual times recorded might be in the algorithm used
 internally, or it could be due to system resource limitations or contention.
 
-See also the L<DBIx::Profiler> which will profile database queries running
+See also the L<DBIx::Profile> which will profile database queries running
 under the C<DBIx::*> namespace.
 
 =head2 Devel::NYTProf
@@ -1137,7 +1137,7 @@ deserve further attention.
     Apache::DProf
     Apache::SmallProf
     Benchmark
-    DBIx::Profiler
+    DBIx::Profile
     Devel::AutoProfiler
     Devel::DProf
     Devel::DProfLB
index 97a2a2d..9b34ef2 100644 (file)
@@ -1145,7 +1145,7 @@ Also see:
 
 =item *
 
-F<README.vms> (installed as L<README_vms>), L<perlvms>
+F<README.vms> (installed as F<README_vms>), L<perlvms>
 
 =item *
 
index 0175fbe..56e42f8 100644 (file)
@@ -1840,12 +1840,12 @@ match takes a long time to finish.
 
 A powerful tool for optimizing such beasts is what is known as an
 "independent group",
-which does not backtrack (see L<C<< (?>pattern) >>>).  Note also that
+which does not backtrack (see L</C<< (?>pattern) >>>).  Note also that
 zero-length look-ahead/look-behind assertions will not backtrack to make
 the tail match, since they are in "logical" context: only
 whether they match is considered relevant.  For an example
 where side-effects of look-ahead I<might> have influenced the
-following match, see L<C<< (?>pattern) >>>.
+following match, see L</C<< (?>pattern) >>>.
 
 =head2 Version 8 Regular Expressions
 X<regular expression, version 8> X<regex, version 8> X<regexp, version 8>
index dfe7af5..7028650 100644 (file)
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ Additional flags:
 Set if C<use locale> is in effect. If present in C<< rx->extflags >>
 C<split> will use the locale dependent definition of whitespace under
 when RXf_SKIPWHITE or RXf_WHITE are in effect. Under ASCII whitespace
-is defined as per L<isSPACE|perlapi/ISSPACE>, and by the internal
+is defined as per L<isSPACE|perlapi/isSPACE>, and by the internal
 macros C<is_utf8_space> under UTF-8 and C<isSPACE_LC> under C<use
 locale>.
 
index 473205a..9165dca 100644 (file)
@@ -927,7 +927,7 @@ will treat the #! line as the first line.
 Thus a warning on the 2nd line of the program (which is on the 100th
 line in the file) will be reported as line 2, and not as line 100.
 This can be overridden by using the #line directive.
-(See L<perlsyn/"Plain-Old-Comments-(Not!)">)
+(See L<perlsyn/"Plain Old Comments (Not!)">)
 
 If a directory name is specified, Perl will switch to that directory
 before running the program.  The B<-x> switch controls only the
@@ -1211,7 +1211,7 @@ X<PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL>
 
 Relevant only if your perl executable was built with B<-DDEBUGGING>,
 this controls the behavior of global destruction of objects and other
-references.  See L<perlhack/PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information.
+references.  See L<perlhacktips/PERL_DESTRUCT_LEVEL> for more information.
 
 =item PERL_DL_NONLAZY
 X<PERL_DL_NONLAZY>
index cfa4ad4..ece4f15 100644 (file)
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ it.  Similarly, in the conditional
 
 the scope of $answer extends from its declaration through the rest
 of that conditional, including any C<elsif> and C<else> clauses, 
-but not beyond it.  See L<perlsyn/"Simple statements"> for information
+but not beyond it.  See L<perlsyn/"Simple Statements"> for information
 on the scope of variables in statements with modifiers.
 
 The C<foreach> loop defaults to scoping its index variable dynamically
index ba10a48..de0e373 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ programming languages offer you 1 line of immortality?
 =head2 Migrate t/ from custom TAP generation
 
 Many tests below F<t/> still generate TAP by "hand", rather than using library
-functions. As explained in L<perlhack/Writing a test>, tests in F<t/> are
+functions. As explained in L<perlhack/TESTING>, tests in F<t/> are
 written in a particular way to test that more complex constructions actually
 work before using them routinely. Hence they don't use C<Test::More>, but
 instead there is an intentionally simpler library, F<t/test.pl>. However,
index 53295f0..39bab24 100644 (file)
@@ -1691,7 +1691,7 @@ A format contains C<formline()> calls that put their result into
 C<$^A>. After calling its format, C<write()> prints out the contents
 of C<$^A> and empties. So you never really see the contents of C<$^A>
 unless you call C<formline()> yourself and then look at it. See
-L<perlform> and L<perlfunc/formline()>.
+L<perlform> and L<perlfunc/"formline PICTURE,LIST">.
 
 =item HANDLE->format_formfeed(EXPR)
 
index fe2b5d8..7e96c06 100644 (file)
@@ -848,10 +848,10 @@ Therefore, the "system time" elements will always be 0, since
 there is no difference between "user time" and "system" time 
 under VMS, and the time accumulated by a subprocess may or may 
 not appear separately in the "child time" field, depending on 
-whether L<times> keeps track of subprocesses separately.  Note
+whether C<times()> keeps track of subprocesses separately.  Note
 especially that the VAXCRTL (at least) keeps track only of
-subprocesses spawned using L<fork> and L<exec>; it will not
-accumulate the times of subprocesses spawned via pipes, L<system>,
+subprocesses spawned using C<fork()> and C<exec()>; it will not
+accumulate the times of subprocesses spawned via pipes, C<system()>,
 or backticks.
 
 =item unlink LIST