This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Wordsmithing of Abigail's prose.
authorJesse Vincent <jesse@bestpractical.com>
Thu, 9 Dec 2010 20:05:41 +0000 (15:05 -0500)
committerJesse Vincent <jesse@bestpractical.com>
Thu, 9 Dec 2010 20:50:52 +0000 (15:50 -0500)
pod/perlintro.pod

index 4472d9f..2d0076a 100644 (file)
@@ -22,23 +22,24 @@ Throughout this document you'll see references to other parts of the
 Perl documentation.  You can read that documentation using the C<perldoc>
 command or whatever method you're using to read this document.
 
-Many of the examples in the documentation are code fragments,
-not complete programs, intended to help understand the discussed
-features. They may reflect the style and preference of the author of
-that piece of the documentation, and may be brever than a corresponding
-line of code in a real program. It's usually taken for granted that
-strict and warnings have been enabled, and that used variables have
-been declared without explicitely stating this in each fragment.
-
-Do note that the examples have been written over a period of more than a
-dozen years, and that a large range of authors have contributed. Styles
-and techniques will therefore differ, although some effort has been made
-to not vary styles too widely in the same sections. Do not consider one
-style to be better than others - "There Is More Than One Way Of Doing
-It" is one of Perls mottos. After all, in your journey as a programmer,
-you are likely to encounter different styles.
-
-
+Throughout Perl's documentation, you'll find numerous examples intended
+to help explain the discussed features.  Please keep in mind that many
+of them are code fragments rather than complete programs.
+
+These examples often reflect the style and preference of the author of
+that piece of the documentation, and may be briefer than a corresponding
+line of code in a real program.  Except where otherwise noted, you
+should assume that C<use strict> and C<use warnings> statements
+appear earlier in the "program", and that any variables used have
+already been declared, even if those declarations have been omitted
+to make the example easier to read.
+
+Do note that the examples have been written by many different authors over
+a period of several decades. Styles and techniques will therefore differ,
+although some effort has been made to not vary styles too widely in the
+same sections. Do not consider one style to be better than others - "There
+Is More Than One Way Of Doing It" is one Perl's mottos. After all, in your
+journey as a programmer, you are likely to encounter different styles.
 
 =head2 What is Perl?