This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Upgrade to version-0.49
authorSteve Peters <steve@fisharerojo.org>
Sun, 16 Oct 2005 13:53:00 +0000 (13:53 +0000)
committerSteve Peters <steve@fisharerojo.org>
Sun, 16 Oct 2005 13:53:00 +0000 (13:53 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@25768

lib/version.pm
lib/version.pod

index 56efdaf..07787cc 100644 (file)
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ use vars qw(@ISA $VERSION $CLASS @EXPORT);
 
 @EXPORT = qw(qv);
 
-$VERSION = "0.48";
+$VERSION = "0.49";
 
 $CLASS = 'version';
 
index eb9a301..34bdacd 100644 (file)
@@ -45,10 +45,10 @@ Versions>.  This also covers versions with a single decimal place and
 a single embedded underscore, see L<Numeric Alpha Versions>, even though
 these must be quoted to preserve the underscore formatting.
 
-=item * Quoted Versions
+=item * Extended Versions
 
 Any initial parameter which contains more than one decimal point
-and an optional embedded underscore, see L<Quoted Versions>.
+and an optional embedded underscore, see L<Extended Versions>.
 
 =back
 
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ if required:
   $v3 = version->new(  1.2.3);   # v1.2.3 for Perl >= 5.8.1
 
 In specific, version numbers initialized as L<Numeric Versions> will
-stringify in Numeric form.  Version numbers initialized as L<Quoted Versions>
+stringify in Numeric form.  Version numbers initialized as L<Extended Versions>
 will be stringified as L<Normal Form>.
 
 Please see L<Quoting> for more details on how Perl will parse various
@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ this module is only possible with Perl 5.8.1 or better (which contain special
 code to enable it).  Their use is B<strongly> discouraged in all 
 circumstances (especially the leading 'v' style), since the meaning will
 change depending on which Perl you are running.  It is better to use
-L<"Quoted Versions"> to ensure the proper interpretation.
+L<"Extended Versions"> to ensure the proper interpretation.
 
 =head2 Numeric Versions
 
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ digits after the decimal place, it will be split on each multiple of 3, so
 1.0003 becomes 1.0.300, due to the need to remain compatible with Perl's
 own 5.005_03 == 5.5.30 interpretation.
 
-=head2 Quoted Versions
+=head2 Extended Versions
 
 These are the newest form of versions, and correspond to Perl's own
 version style beginning with 5.6.0.  Starting with Perl 5.10.0,
@@ -144,9 +144,9 @@ method requires that the input parameter be quoted, although Perl's after
 5.9.0 can use bare numbers with multiple decimal places as a special form
 of quoting.
 
-Unlike L<Numeric Versions>, Quoted Versions may have more than
+Unlike L<Numeric Versions>, Extended Versions may have more than
 a single decimal point, e.g. "5.6.1" (for all versions of Perl).  If a
-Quoted Version has only one decimal place (and no embedded underscore),
+Extended Version has only one decimal place (and no embedded underscore),
 it is interpreted exactly like a L<Numeric Version>.  
 
 So, for example:
@@ -155,10 +155,10 @@ So, for example:
   $v = version->new( "1.2.3");    # 1.2.3
   $v = version->new("1.0003");    # 1.0.300
 
-In addition to conventional versions, Quoted Versions can be
+In addition to conventional versions, Extended Versions can be
 used to create L<Alpha Versions>.
 
-In general, Quoted Versions permit the greatest amount of freedom
+In general, Extended Versions permit the greatest amount of freedom
 to specify a version, whereas Numeric Versions enforce a certain
 uniformity.  See also L<New Operator> for an additional method of
 initializing version objects.
@@ -215,7 +215,7 @@ In other words, the version will be automatically parsed out of the
 string, and it will be quoted to preserve the meaning CVS normally
 carries for versions.  The CVS $Revision$ increments differently from
 numeric versions (i.e. 1.10 follows 1.9), so it must be handled as if
-it were a L<Quoted Version>.
+it were a L<Extended Version>.
 
 A new version object can be created as a copy of an existing version
 object, either as a class method:
@@ -307,7 +307,7 @@ trailing zeros to preserve the correct version value.
 In order to mirror as much as possible the existing behavior of ordinary
 $VERSION scalars, the stringification operation will display differently,
 depending on whether the version was initialized as a L<Numeric Version>
-or L<Quoted Version>.
+or L<Extended Version>.
 
 What this means in practice is that if the normal CPAN and Camel rules are
 followed ($VERSION is a floating point number with no more than 3 decimal
@@ -316,7 +316,7 @@ output.  There will be no visible difference, although the internal
 representation will be different, and the L<Comparison operators> will 
 function using the internal coding.
 
-If a version object is initialized using a L<Quoted Version> form, or if
+If a version object is initialized using a L<Extended Version> form, or if
 the number of significant decimal places exceed three, then the stringified
 form will be the L<Normal Form>.  The $obj->normal operation can always be
 used to produce the L<Normal Form>, even if the version was originally a
@@ -360,7 +360,7 @@ first glance.  For example, the following inequalities hold:
   version->new("0.96.1") < version->new(0.95); # 0.096.1 < 0.950.0
 
 For this reason, it is best to use either exclusively L<Numeric Versions> or
-L<Quoted Versions> with multiple decimal places.
+L<Extended Versions> with multiple decimal places.
 
 =back
 
@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ which is mathematically equivalent and ASCII sorts exactly the same as
 without the trailing zeros.
 
 Alpha versions with more than a single decimal place will be treated 
-exactly as if they were L<Quoted Versions>, and will display without any
+exactly as if they were L<Extended Versions>, and will display without any
 trailing (or leading) zeros, in the L<Version Normal> form.  For example,
 
   $newver = version->new("12.3.1_1");
@@ -534,558 +534,18 @@ derived class:
 See also L<version::AlphaBeta> on CPAN for an alternate representation of
 version strings.
 
-=head1 EXPORT
-
-qv - quoted version initialization operator
-
-=head1 AUTHOR
-
-John Peacock E<lt>jpeacock@cpan.orgE<gt>
-
-=head1 SEE ALSO
-
-L<perl>.
-
-=cut
-=head1 NAME
-
-version - Perl extension for Version Objects
-
-=head1 SYNOPSIS
-
-  use version;
-  $version = version->new("12.2.1"); # must be quoted for Perl < 5.8.1
-  print $version;              # 12.2.1
-  print $version->numify;      # 12.002001
-  if ( $version gt  "12.2" )   # true
-
-  $alphaver = version->new("1.02_03"); # must be quoted!
-  print $alphaver;             # 1.02_030
-  print $alphaver->is_alpha();  # true
-  
-  $ver = qv(1.2);               # 1.2.0
-  $ver = qv("1.2");             # 1.2.0
-
-  $perlver = version->new(5.005_03); # must not be quoted!
-  print $perlver;              # 5.005030
-
-=head1 DESCRIPTION
-
-Overloaded version objects for all versions of Perl.  This module
-implements all of the features of version objects which will be part
-of Perl 5.10.0 except automatic version object creation.
-
-=head2 What IS a version
-
-For the purposes of this module, a version "number" is a sequence of
-positive integral values separated by decimal points and optionally a
-single underscore.  This corresponds to what Perl itself uses for a
-version, as well as extending the "version as number" that is discussed
-in the various editions of the Camel book.
-
-There are actually two distinct ways to initialize versions:
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Numeric Versions
-
-Any initial parameter which "looks like a number", see L<Numeric
-Versions>.  This also covers versions with a single decimal place and
-a single embedded underscore, see L<Numeric Alpha Versions>, even though
-these must be quoted to preserve the underscore formatting.
-
-=item * Quoted Versions
-
-Any initial parameter which contains more than one decimal point
-and an optional embedded underscore, see L<Quoted Versions>.
-
-=back
-
-Both of these methods will produce similar version objects, in that
-the default stringification will yield the version L<Normal Form> only 
-if required:
-
-  $v  = version->new(1.002);     # 1.002, but compares like 1.2.0
-  $v  = version->new(1.002003);  # 1.002003
-  $v2 = version->new( "1.2.3");  # v1.2.3
-  $v3 = version->new(  1.2.3);   # v1.2.3 for Perl >= 5.8.1
-
-In specific, version numbers initialized as L<Numeric Versions> will
-stringify in Numeric form.  Version numbers initialized as L<Quoted Versions>
-will be stringified as L<Normal Form>.
-
-Please see L<Quoting> for more details on how Perl will parse various
-input values.
-
-Any value passed to the new() operator will be parsed only so far as it
-contains a numeric, decimal, or underscore character.  So, for example:
-
-  $v1 = version->new("99 and 94/100 percent pure"); # $v1 == 99.0
-  $v2 = version->new("something"); # $v2 == "" and $v2->numify == 0
-
-However, see L<New Operator> for one case where non-numeric text is
-acceptable when initializing version objects.
-
-=head2 What about v-strings?
-
-Beginning with Perl 5.6.0, an alternate method to code arbitrary strings
-of bytes was introduced, called v-strings.  They were intended to be an
-easy way to enter, for example, Unicode strings (which contain two bytes
-per character).  Some programs have used them to encode printer control
-characters (e.g. CRLF).  They were also intended to be used for $VERSION.
-Their use has been problematic from the start and they will be phased out
-beginning in Perl 5.10.0.
-
-There are two ways to enter v-strings: a bare number with two or more
-decimal places, or a bare number with one or more decimal places and a 
-leading 'v' character (also bare).  For example:
-
-  $vs1 = 1.2.3; # encoded as \1\2\3
-  $vs2 = v1.2;  # encoded as \1\2 
-
-The first of those two syntaxes is destined to be the default way to create
-a version object in 5.10.0, whereas the second will issue a mandatory
-deprecation warning beginning at the same time.  In both cases, a v-string
-encoded version will always be stringified in the version L<Normal Form>.
-
-Consequently, the use of v-strings to initialize version objects with
-this module is only possible with Perl 5.8.1 or better (which contain special
-code to enable it).  Their use is B<strongly> discouraged in all 
-circumstances (especially the leading 'v' style), since the meaning will
-change depending on which Perl you are running.  It is better to use
-L<"Quoted Versions"> to ensure the proper interpretation.
-
-=head2 Numeric Versions
-
-These correspond to historical versions of Perl itself prior to 5.6.0,
-as well as all other modules which follow the Camel rules for the
-$VERSION scalar.  A numeric version is initialized with what looks like
-a floating point number.  Leading zeros B<are> significant and trailing
-zeros are implied so that a minimum of three places is maintained
-between subversions.  What this means is that any subversion (digits
-to the right of the decimal place) that contains less than three digits
-will have trailing zeros added to make up the difference, but only for
-purposes of comparison with other version objects.  For example:
-
-  $v = version->new(      1.2);    # prints 1.2, compares as 1.200.0
-  $v = version->new(     1.02);    # prints 1.02, compares as 1.20.0
-  $v = version->new(    1.002);    # prints 1.002, compares as 1.2.0
-  $v = version->new(   1.0023);    # 1.2.300
-  $v = version->new(  1.00203);    # 1.2.30
-  $v = version->new( 1.002_03);    # 1.2.30   See "Quoting"
-  $v = version->new( 1.002003);    # 1.2.3
-
-All of the preceding examples except the second to last are true
-whether or not the input value is quoted.  The important feature is that
-the input value contains only a single decimal.
-
-IMPORTANT NOTE: If your numeric version contains more than 3 significant
-digits after the decimal place, it will be split on each multiple of 3, so
-1.0003 becomes 1.0.300, due to the need to remain compatible with Perl's
-own 5.005_03 == 5.5.30 interpretation.
-
-=head2 Quoted Versions
-
-These are the newest form of versions, and correspond to Perl's own
-version style beginning with 5.6.0.  Starting with Perl 5.10.0,
-and most likely Perl 6, this is likely to be the preferred form.  This
-method requires that the input parameter be quoted, although Perl's after 
-5.9.0 can use bare numbers with multiple decimal places as a special form
-of quoting.
-
-Unlike L<Numeric Versions>, Quoted Versions may have more than
-a single decimal point, e.g. "5.6.1" (for all versions of Perl).  If a
-Quoted Version has only one decimal place (and no embedded underscore),
-it is interpreted exactly like a L<Numeric Version>.  
-
-So, for example:
-
-  $v = version->new( "1.002");    # 1.2
-  $v = version->new( "1.2.3");    # 1.2.3
-  $v = version->new("1.0003");    # 1.0.300
-
-In addition to conventional versions, Quoted Versions can be
-used to create L<Alpha Versions>.
-
-In general, Quoted Versions permit the greatest amount of freedom
-to specify a version, whereas Numeric Versions enforce a certain
-uniformity.  See also L<New Operator> for an additional method of
-initializing version objects.
-
-=head2 Numeric Alpha Versions
-
-The one time that a numeric version must be quoted is when a alpha form is
-used with an otherwise numeric version (i.e. a single decimal place).  This
-is commonly used for CPAN releases, where CPAN or CPANPLUS will ignore alpha
-versions for automatic updating purposes.  Since some developers have used
-only two significant decimal places for their non-alpha releases, the
-version object will automatically take that into account if the initializer
-is quoted.  For example Module::Example was released to CPAN with the
-following sequence of $VERSION's:
-
-  # $VERSION    Stringified
-  0.01          0.010
-  0.02          0.020
-  0.02_01       0.02_0100
-  0.02_02       0.02_0200
-  0.03          0.030
-  etc.
-
-As you can see, the version object created from the values in the first
-column may contain a trailing 0, but will otherwise be both mathematically
-equivalent and sorts alpha-numerically as would be expected.
-
-=head2 Object Methods
-
-Overloading has been used with version objects to provide a natural
-interface for their use.  All mathematical operations are forbidden,
-since they don't make any sense for base version objects.
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * New Operator
-
-Like all OO interfaces, the new() operator is used to initialize
-version objects.  One way to increment versions when programming is to
-use the CVS variable $Revision, which is automatically incremented by
-CVS every time the file is committed to the repository.
-
-In order to facilitate this feature, the following
-code can be employed:
-
-  $VERSION = version->new(qw$Revision: 2.7 $);
-
-and the version object will be created as if the following code
-were used:
-
-  $VERSION = version->new("v2.7");
-
-In other words, the version will be automatically parsed out of the
-string, and it will be quoted to preserve the meaning CVS normally
-carries for versions.  The CVS $Revision$ increments differently from
-numeric versions (i.e. 1.10 follows 1.9), so it must be handled as if
-it were a L<Quoted Version>.
-
-A new version object can be created as a copy of an existing version
-object, either as a class method:
-
-  $v1 = version->new(12.3);
-  $v2 = version->new($v1);
-
-or as an object method:
-
-  $v1 = version->new(12.3);
-  $v2 = $v1->new();
-
-and in each case, $v1 and $v2 will be identical.
-
-=back
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * qv()
-
-An alternate way to create a new version object is through the exported
-qv() sub.  This is not strictly like other q? operators (like qq, qw),
-in that the only delimiters supported are parentheses (or spaces).  It is
-the best way to initialize a short version without triggering the floating
-point interpretation.  For example:
-
-  $v1 = qv(1.2);         # 1.2.0
-  $v2 = qv("1.2");       # also 1.2.0
-
-As you can see, either a bare number or a quoted string can be used, and
-either will yield the same version number.
-
-=back
-
-For the subsequent examples, the following three objects will be used:
-
-  $ver   = version->new("1.2.3.4"); # see "Quoting" below
-  $alpha = version->new("1.2.3_4"); # see "Alpha versions" below
-  $nver  = version->new(1.002);       # see "Numeric Versions" above
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Normal Form
-
-For any version object which is initialized with multiple decimal
-places (either quoted or if possible v-string), or initialized using
-the L<qv()> operator, the stringified representation is returned in
-a normalized or reduced form (no extraneous zeros), and with a leading 'v':
-
-  print $ver->normal;         # prints as v1.2.3
-  print $ver->stringify;      # ditto
-  print $ver;                 # ditto
-  print $nver->normal;        # prints as v1.2.0
-  print $nver->stringify;     # prints as 1.002, see "Stringification" 
-
-In order to preserve the meaning of the processed version, the 
-normalized representation will always contain at least three sub terms.
-In other words, the following is guaranteed to always be true:
-
-  my $newver = version->new($ver->stringify);
-  if ($newver eq $ver ) # always true
-    {...}
-
-=back
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Numification
-
-Although all mathematical operations on version objects are forbidden
-by default, it is possible to retrieve a number which roughly
-corresponds to the version object through the use of the $obj->numify
-method.  For formatting purposes, when displaying a number which
-corresponds a version object, all sub versions are assumed to have
-three decimal places.  So for example:
-
-  print $ver->numify;         # prints 1.002003
-  print $nver->numify;        # prints 1.002
-
-Unlike the stringification operator, there is never any need to append
-trailing zeros to preserve the correct version value.
-
-=back
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Stringification
-
-In order to mirror as much as possible the existing behavior of ordinary
-$VERSION scalars, the stringification operation will display differently,
-depending on whether the version was initialized as a L<Numeric Version>
-or L<Quoted Version>.
-
-What this means in practice is that if the normal CPAN and Camel rules are
-followed ($VERSION is a floating point number with no more than 3 decimal
-places), the stringified output will be exactly the same as the numified
-output.  There will be no visible difference, although the internal 
-representation will be different, and the L<Comparison operators> will 
-function using the internal coding.
-
-If a version object is initialized using a L<Quoted Version> form, or if
-the number of significant decimal places exceed three, then the stringified
-form will be the L<Normal Form>.  The $obj->normal operation can always be
-used to produce the L<Normal Form>, even if the version was originally a
-L<Numeric Version>.
-
-  print $ver->stringify;    # prints v1.2.3
-  print $nver->stringify;   # prints 1.002
-
-=back
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Comparison operators
-
-Both cmp and <=> operators perform the same comparison between terms
-(upgrading to a version object automatically).  Perl automatically
-generates all of the other comparison operators based on those two.
-In addition to the obvious equalities listed below, appending a single
-trailing 0 term does not change the value of a version for comparison
-purposes.  In other words "v1.2" and "1.2.0" will compare as identical.
-
-For example, the following relations hold:
-
-  As Number       As String          Truth Value
-  ---------       ------------       -----------
-  $ver >  1.0     $ver gt "1.0"      true
-  $ver <  2.5     $ver lt            true
-  $ver != 1.3     $ver ne "1.3"      true
-  $ver == 1.2     $ver eq "1.2"      false
-  $ver == 1.2.3   $ver eq "1.2.3"    see discussion below
-
-It is probably best to chose either the numeric notation or the string
-notation and stick with it, to reduce confusion.  Perl6 version objects
-B<may> only support numeric comparisons.  See also L<"Quoting">.
-
-WARNING: Comparing version with unequal numbers of decimal places (whether
-explicitly or implicitly initialized), may yield unexpected results at
-first glance.  For example, the following inequalities hold:
-
-  version->new(0.96)     > version->new(0.95); # 0.960.0 > 0.950.0
-  version->new("0.96.1") < version->new(0.95); # 0.096.1 < 0.950.0
-
-For this reason, it is best to use either exclusively L<Numeric Versions> or
-L<Quoted Versions> with multiple decimal places.
-
-=back
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Logical Operators 
-
-If you need to test whether a version object
-has been initialized, you can simply test it directly:
-
-  $vobj = version->new($something);
-  if ( $vobj )   # true only if $something was non-blank
-
-You can also test whether a version object is an L<Alpha version>, for
-example to prevent the use of some feature not present in the main
-release:
-
-  $vobj = version->new("1.2_3"); # MUST QUOTE
-  ...later...
-  if ( $vobj->is_alpha )       # True
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Quoting
-
-Because of the nature of the Perl parsing and tokenizing routines,
-certain initialization values B<must> be quoted in order to correctly
-parse as the intended version, and additionally, some initial values
-B<must not> be quoted to obtain the intended version.
-
-Except for L<Alpha versions>, any version initialized with something
-that looks like a number (a single decimal place) will be parsed in
-the same way whether or not the term is quoted.  In order to be
-compatible with earlier Perl version styles, any use of versions of
-the form 5.006001 will be translated as 5.6.1.  In other words, a
-version with a single decimal place will be parsed as implicitly
-having three places between subversions.
-
-The complicating factor is that in bare numbers (i.e. unquoted), the
-underscore is a legal numeric character and is automatically stripped
-by the Perl tokenizer before the version code is called.  However, if
-a number containing one or more decimals and an underscore is quoted, i.e.
-not bare, that is considered a L<Alpha Version> and the underscore is
-significant.
-
-If you use a mathematic formula that resolves to a floating point number,
-you are dependent on Perl's conversion routines to yield the version you
-expect.  You are pretty safe by dividing by a power of 10, for example,
-but other operations are not likely to be what you intend.  For example:
-
-  $VERSION = version->new((qw$Revision: 1.4)[1]/10);
-  print $VERSION;          # yields 0.14
-  $V2 = version->new(100/9); # Integer overflow in decimal number
-  print $V2;               # yields something like 11.111.111.100
-
-Perl 5.8.1 and beyond will be able to automatically quote v-strings but
-that is not possible in earlier versions of Perl.  In other words:
-
-  $version = version->new("v2.5.4");  # legal in all versions of Perl
-  $newvers = version->new(v2.5.4);    # legal only in Perl >= 5.8.1
-
-
-=head2 Types of Versions Objects
-
-There are two types of Version Objects:
-
-=over 4
-
-=item * Ordinary versions
-
-These are the versions that normal modules will use.  Can contain as
-many subversions as required.  In particular, those using RCS/CVS can
-use the following:
-
-  $VERSION = version->new(qw$Revision: 2.7 $);
-
-and the current RCS Revision for that file will be inserted
-automatically.  If the file has been moved to a branch, the Revision
-will have three or more elements; otherwise, it will have only two.
-This allows you to automatically increment your module version by
-using the Revision number from the primary file in a distribution, see
-L<ExtUtils::MakeMaker/"VERSION_FROM">.
-
-=item * Alpha Versions
-
-For module authors using CPAN, the convention has been to note
-unstable releases with an underscore in the version string, see
-L<CPAN>.  Alpha releases will test as being newer than the more recent
-stable release, and less than the next stable release.  For example:
-
-  $alphaver = version->new("12.03_01"); # must be quoted
-
-obeys the relationship
-
-  12.03 < $alphaver < 12.04
-
-Alpha versions with a single decimal place will be treated exactly as if
-they were L<Numeric Versions>, for parsing purposes.  The stringification for
-alpha versions with a single decimal place may seem surprising, since any
-trailing zeros will visible.  For example, the above $alphaver will print as
-
-  12.03_0100
-
-which is mathematically equivalent and ASCII sorts exactly the same as
-without the trailing zeros.
+B<NOTE:> the L<qv> operator is not a class method and will not be inherited
+in the same way as the other methods.  L<qv> will always return an object of
+type L<version> and not an object in the derived class.  If you need to
+have L<qv> return an object in your derived class, add something like this:
 
-Alpha versions with more than a single decimal place will be treated 
-exactly as if they were L<Quoted Versions>, and will display without any
-trailing (or leading) zeros, in the L<Version Normal> form.  For example,
-
-  $newver = version->new("12.3.1_1");
-  print $newver; # v12.3.1_1
-
-=head2 Replacement UNIVERSAL::VERSION
-
-In addition to the version objects, this modules also replaces the core
-UNIVERSAL::VERSION function with one that uses version objects for its
-comparisons.  The return from this operator is always the numified form,
-and the warning message generated includes both the numified and normal
-forms (for clarity).
-
-For example:
-
-  package Foo;
-  $VERSION = 1.2;
-
-  package Bar;
-  $VERSION = "1.3.5"; # works with all Perl's (since it is quoted)
-
-  package main;
-  use version;
-
-  print $Foo::VERSION; # prints 1.2
-
-  print $Bar::VERSION; # prints 1.003005
-
-  eval "use CGI 10"; # some far future release
-  print $@; # prints "CGI version 10 (10.0.0) required..."
-
-IMPORTANT NOTE: This may mean that code which searches for a specific
-string (to determine whether a given module is available) may need to be
-changed.
-
-The replacement UNIVERSAL::VERSION, when used as a function, like this:
-
-  print $module->VERSION;
-
-will also exclusively return the numified form.  Technically, the 
-$module->VERSION function returns a string (PV) that can be converted to a 
-number following the normal Perl rules, when used in a numeric context.
-
-=head1 SUBCLASSING
-
-This module is specifically designed and tested to be easily subclassed.
-In practice, you only need to override the methods you want to change, but
-you have to take some care when overriding new() (since that is where all
-of the parsing takes place).  For example, this is a perfect acceptable
-derived class:
-
-  package myversion;
-  use base version;
-  sub new { 
-      my($self,$n)=@_;
-      my $obj;
-      # perform any special input handling here
-      $obj = $self->SUPER::new($n);
-      # and/or add additional hash elements here
-      return $obj;
-  }
+  *::qv = sub { return bless version::qv(shift), __PACKAGE__ };
 
-See also L<version::AlphaBeta> on CPAN for an alternate representation of
-version strings.
+as seen in the test file F<t/02derived.t>.
 
 =head1 EXPORT
 
-qv - quoted version initialization operator
+qv - Extended Version initialization operator
 
 =head1 AUTHOR