This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Podtidy perlrepository.pod
authorLeon Brocard <acme@astray.com>
Tue, 3 Aug 2010 14:39:57 +0000 (16:39 +0200)
committerLeon Brocard <acme@astray.com>
Tue, 3 Aug 2010 14:39:57 +0000 (16:39 +0200)
pod/perlrepository.pod

index 58ff18a..bf7e511 100644 (file)
@@ -66,8 +66,7 @@ directory.
 
 If you cloned using the git protocol, which is faster than ssh, then
 you will need to modify the URL for the origin remote to enable
-pushing. To do that edit F<.git/config> with git-config(1) like
-this:
+pushing. To do that edit F<.git/config> with git-config(1) like this:
 
   % git config remote.origin.url ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git
 
@@ -226,22 +225,23 @@ not been pushed to the C<origin> remote yet. B<NOTE>: that this output
 is also what you see as a template if you do not provide a message to
 C<git commit>.
 
-Assuming that you'd like to commit all the changes you've just made as a
-a single atomic unit, run this command:
+Assuming that you'd like to commit all the changes you've just made as
+a single atomic unit, run this command:
 
    % git commit -a
 
 (That C<-a> tells git to add every file you've changed to this commit.
-New files aren't automatically added to your commit when you use C<commit
--a> If you want to add files or to commit some, but not all of your
-changes, have a look at the documentation for C<git add>.)
+New files aren't automatically added to your commit when you use
+C<commit -a> If you want to add files or to commit some, but not all of
+your changes, have a look at the documentation for C<git add>.)
 
 Git will start up your favorite text editor, so that you can craft a
 commit message for your change. See L</Commit message> below for more
 information about what makes a good commit message.
 
-Once you've finished writing your commit message and exited your editor,
-git will write your change to disk and tell you something like this:
+Once you've finished writing your commit message and exited your
+editor, git will write your change to disk and tell you something like
+this:
 
   Created commit daf8e63: explain git status and stuff about remotes
    1 files changed, 83 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
@@ -299,11 +299,10 @@ which is the short form of
 
 Creating a topic branch makes it easier for the maintainers to rebase
 or merge back into the master blead for a more linear history. If you
-don't work on a topic branch the maintainer has to manually cherry
-pick your changes onto blead before they can be applied.
+don't work on a topic branch the maintainer has to manually cherry pick
+your changes onto blead before they can be applied.
 
-That'll get you scolded on perl5-porters, so don't do that. Be
-Awesome.
+That'll get you scolded on perl5-porters, so don't do that. Be Awesome.
 
 Then make your changes. For example, if Leon Brocard changes his name
 to Orange Brocard, we should change his name in the AUTHORS file:
@@ -360,8 +359,8 @@ Now you should create a patch file for all your local changes:
 You should now send an email to to
 L<perlbug@perl.org|mailto:perlbug@perl.org> with a description of your
 changes, and include this patch file as an attachment. In addition to
-being tracked by RT, mail to perlbug will automatically be forwarded
-to perl5-porters. You should only send patches to
+being tracked by RT, mail to perlbug will automatically be forwarded to
+perl5-porters. You should only send patches to
 L<perl5-porters@perl.org|mailto:perl5-porters@perl.org> directly if the
 patch is not ready to be applied, but intended for discussion.
 
@@ -411,8 +410,8 @@ Be aware that many files in the distribution are derivative--avoid
 patching them, because git won't see the changes to them, and the build
 process will overwrite them. Patch the originals instead.  Most
 utilities (like perldoc) are in this category, i.e. patch
-F<utils/perldoc.PL> rather than F<utils/perldoc>. Similarly, don't create
-patches for files under $src_root/ext from their copies found in
+F<utils/perldoc.PL> rather than F<utils/perldoc>. Similarly, don't
+create patches for files under $src_root/ext from their copies found in
 $install_root/lib.  If you are unsure about the proper location of a
 file that may have gotten copied while building the source
 distribution, consult the C<MANIFEST>.
@@ -421,20 +420,20 @@ As a special case, several files are regenerated by 'make regen' if
 your patch alters C<embed.fnc>.  These are needed for compilation, but
 are included in the distribution so that you can build perl without
 needing another perl to generate the files.  You must test with these
-regenerated files, but it is preferred that you instead note that
-'make regen is needed' in both the email and the commit message, and
-submit your patch without them.  If you're submitting a series of
-patches, it might be best to submit the regenerated changes
-immediately after the source-changes that caused them, so as to have
-as little effect as possible on the bisectability of your patchset.
+regenerated files, but it is preferred that you instead note that 'make
+regen is needed' in both the email and the commit message, and submit
+your patch without them.  If you're submitting a series of patches, it
+might be best to submit the regenerated changes immediately after the
+source-changes that caused them, so as to have as little effect as
+possible on the bisectability of your patchset.
 
 =for XXX
 What should we recommend about binary files now? Do we need anything?
 
 =head2 Getting your patch accepted
 
-If you are submitting a code patch there are several things that
-you need to do.
+If you are submitting a code patch there are several things that you
+need to do.
 
 =over 4
 
@@ -444,8 +443,8 @@ As you craft each patch you intend to submit to the Perl core, it's
 important to write a good commit message.
 
 The first line of the commit message should be a short description and
-should skip the full stop. It should be no longer than the subject
-line of an E-Mail, 50 characters being a good rule of thumb.
+should skip the full stop. It should be no longer than the subject line
+of an E-Mail, 50 characters being a good rule of thumb.
 
 A lot of Git tools (Gitweb, GitHub, git log --pretty=oneline, ..) will
 only display the first line (cut off at 50 characters) when presenting
@@ -455,9 +454,9 @@ The commit message should include description of the problem that the
 patch corrects or new functionality that the patch adds.
 
 As a general rule of thumb, your commit message should let a programmer
-with a reasonable familiarity with the Perl core quickly understand what
-you were trying to do, how you were trying to do it and why the change
-matters to Perl.
+with a reasonable familiarity with the Perl core quickly understand
+what you were trying to do, how you were trying to do it and why the
+change matters to Perl.
 
 =over 4
 
@@ -530,10 +529,11 @@ sources:
 
 =item Testsuite
 
-If your patch changes code (rather than just changing documentation) you
-should also include one or more test cases which illustrate the bug you're
-fixing or validate the new functionality you're adding.  In general,
-you should update an existing test file rather than create a new one.
+If your patch changes code (rather than just changing documentation)
+you should also include one or more test cases which illustrate the bug
+you're fixing or validate the new functionality you're adding.  In
+general, you should update an existing test file rather than create a
+new one.
 
 Your testsuite additions should generally follow these guidelines
 (courtesy of Gurusamy Sarathy <gsar@activestate.com>):
@@ -653,8 +653,8 @@ C<git> provides a built-in way to determine, with a binary search in
 the history, which commit should be blamed for introducing a given bug.
 
 Suppose that we have a script F<~/testcase.pl> that exits with C<0>
-when some behaviour is correct, and with C<1> when it's faulty. You need
-an helper script that automates building C<perl> and running the
+when some behaviour is correct, and with C<1> when it's faulty. You
+need an helper script that automates building C<perl> and running the
 testcase:
 
   % cat ~/run
@@ -871,8 +871,8 @@ not allowed.)
 
 =head1 Committing to maintenance versions
 
-Maintenance versions should only be altered to add critical bug
-fixes, see L<perlpolicy>.
+Maintenance versions should only be altered to add critical bug fixes,
+see L<perlpolicy>.
 
 To commit to a maintenance version of perl, you need to create a local
 tracking branch: