This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
sundry pod niggles
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Tue, 16 Mar 1999 04:34:23 +0000 (04:34 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Tue, 16 Mar 1999 04:34:23 +0000 (04:34 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@3110

lib/unicode/MakeEthiopicSyllables.PL
pod/perldelta.pod
pod/perlhist.pod
pod/perlmodinstall.pod
pod/perltodo.pod

index 98e1768..bccec32 100755 (executable)
@@ -20,8 +20,8 @@ open (DIQALA_SADS, ">Is/Y13.pl");  # though people outside of unicode.org
                                    #  might say DIQALA_KAIB...
 
 @fh = qw(
-          GEEZ KAIB SALS RABI HAMS SADS SABI empty
-          DIQALA_GEEZ empty DIQALA_SALS DIQALA_RABI DIQALA_HAMS DIQALA_SADS
+          GEEZ KAIB SALS RABI HAMS SADS SABI none
+          DIQALA_GEEZ none DIQALA_SALS DIQALA_RABI DIQALA_HAMS DIQALA_SADS
        );
 
 
index 49ffc26..da35322 100644 (file)
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ Expressions such as:
        print uc("foo","bar","baz");
        undef($foo,&bar);
 
-used to be accidentally allowed in earlier versions, and produced 
+used to be accidentally allowed in earlier versions, and produced
 unpredictable behavior.  Some of them produced ancillary warnings
 when used in this way, while others silently did the wrong thing.
 
@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ remains unchanged.  See L<perlop>.
 The C<qw//> operator is now evaluated at compile time into a true list
 instead of being replaced with a run time call to C<split()>.  This
 removes the confusing behavior of C<qw//> in scalar context stemming from
-the older implementation, which inherited the behavior from split().  
+the older implementation, which inherited the behavior from split().
 
 Thus:
 
@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ The old syntax has not changed.  As before, the `^X' may either be a
 literal control-X character or the two character sequence `caret' plus
 `X'.  When the braces are omitted, the variable name stops after the
 control character.  Thus C<"$^XYZ"> continues to be synonymous with
-C<$^X . "YZ"> as before.  
+C<$^X . "YZ"> as before.
 
 As before, lexical variables may not have names beginning with control
 characters.  As before, variables whose names begin with a control
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ locking behaviour flags F_FLOCK, F_POSIX, Linux F_SHLCK, and
 O_ACCMODE: the mask of O_RDONLY, O_WRONLY, and O_RDWR.
 
 =item Math::Complex
+
 The accessors methods Re, Im, arg, abs, rho, theta, methods can
 ($z->Re()) now also act as mutators ($z->Re(3)).
 
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ A tutorial that introduces the essentials of references.
 =item /%s/: Unrecognized escape \\%c passed through
 
 (W) You used a backslash-character combination which is not recognized
-by Perl.  This combination appears in an interpolated variable or a 
+by Perl.  This combination appears in an interpolated variable or a
 C<'>-delimited regular expression.
 
 =item Unrecognized escape \\%c passed through
index b5bda55..af5971f 100644 (file)
@@ -5,9 +5,11 @@
 perlhist - the Perl history records
 
 =for RCS
+
 #
 # $Id: perlhist.pod,v 1.57 1999/01/26 17:38:07 jhi Exp $
 #
+
 =end RCS
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
index 9e9657b..b6176f0 100644 (file)
@@ -226,8 +226,11 @@ Make sure the newlines for the modules are in Mac format, not Unix format.
 If they are not then you might have decompressed them incorrectly.  Check
 your decompression and unpacking utilities settings to make sure they are
 translating text files properly.
-As a last resort, you can use the perl one-liner:  perl -i.bak -pe 
-'s/(?:\015)?\012/\015/g' <filenames> on the source files.
+As a last resort, you can use the perl one-liner:
+
+       perl -i.bak -pe 's/(?:\015)?\012/\015/g' filenames
+
+on the source files.
 
 Move the files manually into the correct folders.
 
index 4b5a506..5962fc8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,8 @@
-=head1 Perl TO-DO List
+=head1 NAME
+
+perltodo - Perl TO-DO List
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This is a list of wishes for Perl.  It is maintained by Nathan
 Torkington for the Perl porters.  Send updates to