This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
[win32] integrate mainline
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Thu, 14 May 1998 22:24:26 +0000 (22:24 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Thu, 14 May 1998 22:24:26 +0000 (22:24 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/win32/perl@973

95 files changed:
Configure
INSTALL
MANIFEST
Makefile.SH
Policy_sh.SH
Porting/Contract [new file with mode: 0644]
Porting/Glossary
Porting/config.sh
Porting/config_H
Porting/pumpkin.pod
README.beos [new file with mode: 0644]
Todo
beos/nm.c [new file with mode: 0644]
cflags.SH
config_h.SH
djgpp/djgppsed.sh
doop.c
emacs/ptags
ext/B/B/CC.pm
ext/B/byteperl.c
ext/POSIX/hints/bsdos.pl [new file with mode: 0644]
ext/POSIX/hints/freebsd.pl [new file with mode: 0644]
ext/POSIX/hints/netbsd.pl [new file with mode: 0644]
ext/POSIX/hints/openbsd.pl [new file with mode: 0644]
ext/Thread/Thread.pm
handy.h
hints/beos.sh [new file with mode: 0644]
hints/dos_djgpp.sh
hints/irix_5.sh
hints/irix_6.sh
hints/machten.sh
hints/netbsd.sh
hints/solaris_2.sh
hints/svr4.sh
hints/unicos.sh
hints/unicosmk.sh
hv.h
installperl
lib/Benchmark.pm
lib/ExtUtils/Install.pm
lib/ExtUtils/MM_OS2.pm
lib/ExtUtils/MM_Unix.pm
lib/ExtUtils/MM_VMS.pm
lib/ExtUtils/Mksymlists.pm
lib/Getopt/Long.pm
lib/Getopt/Std.pm
lib/Term/ReadLine.pm
lib/Test.pm
lib/Test/Harness.pm
lib/chat2.pl
lib/perl5db.pl
lib/strict.pm
op.c
os2/Changes
os2/Makefile.SHs
os2/os2.c
os2/os2thread.h
patchlevel.h
perl.c
perl.h
plan9/config.plan9
pod/Makefile
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perldelta.pod
pod/perldelta4.pod [new file with mode: 0644]
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perlsyn.pod
pp.c
pp_hot.c
pp_sys.c
proto.h
sv.c
sv.h
t/TEST
t/harness
t/io/pipe.t
t/lib/anydbm.t
thrdvar.h
thread.h
utils/Makefile
utils/h2ph.PL
utils/perlcc.PL [new file with mode: 0644]
vms/config.vms
vms/descrip.mms
vms/ext/DCLsym/Makefile.PL
vms/ext/Stdio/Makefile.PL
vms/ext/Stdio/Stdio.xs
vms/genconfig.pl
vms/perlvms.pod
win32/config.bc
win32/config.vc
win32/config_H.bc
win32/config_H.vc
x2p/Makefile.SH

index 4430ece..65b1872 100755 (executable)
--- a/Configure
+++ b/Configure
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
 
 # $Id: Head.U,v 3.0.1.9 1997/02/28 15:02:09 ram Exp $
 #
-# Generated on Thu Apr  2 09:30:50 EST 1998 [metaconfig 3.0 PL70]
+# Generated on Wed May 13 13:35:54 EDT 1998 [metaconfig 3.0 PL70]
 
 cat >/tmp/c1$$ <<EOF
 ARGGGHHHH!!!!!
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ if test -d c:/. ; then
                p_=\;
                PATH=`cmd /c "echo %PATH%" | tr '\\\\' / `
                OS2_SHELL=`cmd /c "echo %OS2_SHELL%" | tr '\\\\' / | tr '[A-Z]' '[a-z]'`
-       elif test -n "$DJDIR"; then
+       elif test -n "$DJGPP"; then
                p_=\;
        fi
 fi
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ if test -d /usr/lpp -a -f /usr/bin/bsh -a -f /usr/bin/uname; then
 fi
 case "$inksh/$needksh" in
 /[a-z]*)
-               unset ENV
+               ENV=''
                changesh=true
                reason="$needksh"
        ;;
@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ esac
 
 : Configure runs within the UU subdirectory
 test -d UU || mkdir UU
-unset CDPATH
+CDPATH=''
 cd UU && rm -f ./*
 
 dynamic_ext=''
@@ -249,6 +249,7 @@ obj_ext=''
 path_sep=''
 afs=''
 alignbytes=''
+ansi2knr=''
 archlib=''
 archlibexp=''
 d_archlib=''
@@ -532,6 +533,7 @@ d_pwchange=''
 d_pwclass=''
 d_pwcomment=''
 d_pwexpire=''
+d_pwgecos=''
 d_pwquota=''
 i_pwd=''
 i_sfio=''
@@ -1551,8 +1553,12 @@ for dir in \$*; do
                echo \$thisthing
                exit 0
        elif test -f \$dir/\$thing.exe; then
-               : on Eunice apparently
-               echo \$dir/\$thing
+               if test -n "$DJGPP"; then
+                       echo \$dir/\$thing.exe
+               else
+                       : on Eunice apparently
+                       echo \$dir/\$thing
+               fi
                exit 0
        fi
        ;;
@@ -1873,6 +1879,12 @@ EOM
                                fi
                        fi
                        ;;
+               pc*)
+                       if test -n "$DJGPP"; then
+                               osname=dos
+                               osvers=djgpp
+                       fi
+                       ;;
                esac
 
                case "$1" in
@@ -2012,11 +2024,11 @@ EOM
                        *)      if test -f /etc/systemid; then
                                        osname=sco
                                        set `echo $3 | $sed 's/\./ /g'` $4
-                                       if $test -f sco_$1_$2_$3.sh; then
+                                       if $test -f $src/hints/sco_$1_$2_$3.sh; then
                                                osvers=$1.$2.$3
-                                       elif $test -f sco_$1_$2.sh; then
+                                       elif $test -f $src/hints/sco_$1_$2.sh; then
                                                osvers=$1.$2
-                                       elif $test -f sco_$1.sh; then
+                                       elif $test -f $src/hints/sco_$1.sh; then
                                                osvers=$1
                                        fi
                                else
@@ -2049,10 +2061,6 @@ EOM
                        set X $myuname
                        osname=os2
                        osvers="$5"
-                       if test -n "$DJDIR"; then
-                               osname=dos
-                               osvers=djgpp
-                       fi
                fi
        fi
        
@@ -3012,38 +3020,6 @@ esac
 set d_dosuid
 eval $setvar
 
-: determine where public executables go
-echo " "
-set dflt bin bin
-eval $prefixit
-fn=d~
-rp='Pathname where the public executables will reside?'
-. ./getfile
-if $test "X$ansexp" != "X$binexp"; then
-       installbin=''
-fi
-bin="$ans"
-binexp="$ansexp"
-if $afs; then
-       $cat <<EOM
-
-Since you are running AFS, I need to distinguish the directory in which
-executables reside from the directory in which they are installed (and from
-which they are presumably copied to the former directory by occult means).
-
-EOM
-       case "$installbin" in
-       '') dflt=`echo $binexp | sed 's#^/afs/#/afs/.#'`;;
-       *) dflt="$installbin";;
-       esac
-       fn=de~
-       rp='Where will public executables be installed?'
-       . ./getfile
-       installbin="$ans"
-else
-       installbin="$binexp"
-fi
-
 : determine where manual pages are on this system
 echo " "
 case "$sysman" in
@@ -3342,6 +3318,144 @@ y)      fn=d/
        ;;
 esac
 
+: see how we invoke the C preprocessor
+echo " "
+echo "Now, how can we feed standard input to your C preprocessor..." >&4
+cat <<'EOT' >testcpp.c
+#define ABC abc
+#define XYZ xyz
+ABC.XYZ
+EOT
+cd ..
+echo 'cat >.$$.c; '"$cc"' -E ${1+"$@"} .$$.c; rm .$$.c' >cppstdin
+chmod 755 cppstdin
+wrapper=`pwd`/cppstdin
+ok='false'
+cd UU
+
+if $test "X$cppstdin" != "X" && \
+       $cppstdin $cppminus <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1 && \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
+then
+       echo "You used to use $cppstdin $cppminus so we'll use that again."
+       case "$cpprun" in
+       '') echo "But let's see if we can live without a wrapper..." ;;
+       *)
+               if $cpprun $cpplast <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1 && \
+                       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
+               then
+                       echo "(And we'll use $cpprun $cpplast to preprocess directly.)"
+                       ok='true'
+               else
+                       echo "(However, $cpprun $cpplast does not work, let's see...)"
+               fi
+               ;;
+       esac
+else
+       case "$cppstdin" in
+       '') ;;
+       *)
+               echo "Good old $cppstdin $cppminus does not seem to be of any help..."
+               ;;
+       esac
+fi
+
+if $ok; then
+       : nothing
+elif echo 'Maybe "'"$cc"' -E" will work...'; \
+       $cc -E <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "Yup, it does."
+       x_cpp="$cc -E"
+       x_minus='';
+elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -E -" will work...'; \
+       $cc -E - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "Yup, it does."
+       x_cpp="$cc -E"
+       x_minus='-';
+elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -P" will work...'; \
+       $cc -P <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "Yipee, that works!"
+       x_cpp="$cc -P"
+       x_minus='';
+elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -P -" will work...'; \
+       $cc -P - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "At long last!"
+       x_cpp="$cc -P"
+       x_minus='-';
+elif echo 'No such luck, maybe "'$cpp'" will work...'; \
+       $cpp <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "It works!"
+       x_cpp="$cpp"
+       x_minus='';
+elif echo 'Nixed again...maybe "'$cpp' -" will work...'; \
+       $cpp - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "Hooray, it works!  I was beginning to wonder."
+       x_cpp="$cpp"
+       x_minus='-';
+elif echo 'Uh-uh.  Time to get fancy.  Trying a wrapper...'; \
+       $wrapper <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+       x_cpp="$wrapper"
+       x_minus=''
+       echo "Eureka!"
+else
+       dflt=''
+       rp="No dice.  I can't find a C preprocessor.  Name one:"
+       . ./myread
+       x_cpp="$ans"
+       x_minus=''
+       $x_cpp <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1
+       if $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
+               echo "OK, that will do." >&4
+       else
+echo "Sorry, I can't get that to work.  Go find one and rerun Configure." >&4
+               exit 1
+       fi
+fi
+
+case "$ok" in
+false)
+       cppstdin="$x_cpp"
+       cppminus="$x_minus"
+       cpprun="$x_cpp"
+       cpplast="$x_minus"
+       set X $x_cpp
+       shift
+       case "$1" in
+       "$cpp")
+               echo "Perhaps can we force $cc -E using a wrapper..."
+               if $wrapper <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
+                       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
+               then
+                       echo "Yup, we can."
+                       cppstdin="$wrapper"
+                       cppminus='';
+               else
+                       echo "Nope, we'll have to live without it..."
+               fi
+               ;;
+       esac
+       case "$cpprun" in
+       "$wrapper")
+               cpprun=''
+               cpplast=''
+               ;;
+       esac
+       ;;
+esac
+
+case "$cppstdin" in
+"$wrapper") ;;
+*) $rm -f $wrapper;;
+esac
+$rm -f testcpp.c testcpp.out
+
 : Set private lib path
 case "$plibpth" in
 '') if ./mips; then
@@ -3536,144 +3650,6 @@ none) libs=' ';;
 *) libs="$ans";;
 esac
 
-: see how we invoke the C preprocessor
-echo " "
-echo "Now, how can we feed standard input to your C preprocessor..." >&4
-cat <<'EOT' >testcpp.c
-#define ABC abc
-#define XYZ xyz
-ABC.XYZ
-EOT
-cd ..
-echo 'cat >.$$.c; '"$cc"' -E ${1+"$@"} .$$.c; rm .$$.c' >cppstdin
-chmod 755 cppstdin
-wrapper=`pwd`/cppstdin
-ok='false'
-cd UU
-
-if $test "X$cppstdin" != "X" && \
-       $cppstdin $cppminus <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1 && \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
-then
-       echo "You used to use $cppstdin $cppminus so we'll use that again."
-       case "$cpprun" in
-       '') echo "But let's see if we can live without a wrapper..." ;;
-       *)
-               if $cpprun $cpplast <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1 && \
-                       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
-               then
-                       echo "(And we'll use $cpprun $cpplast to preprocess directly.)"
-                       ok='true'
-               else
-                       echo "(However, $cpprun $cpplast does not work, let's see...)"
-               fi
-               ;;
-       esac
-else
-       case "$cppstdin" in
-       '') ;;
-       *)
-               echo "Good old $cppstdin $cppminus does not seem to be of any help..."
-               ;;
-       esac
-fi
-
-if $ok; then
-       : nothing
-elif echo 'Maybe "'"$cc"' -E" will work...'; \
-       $cc -E <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "Yup, it does."
-       x_cpp="$cc -E"
-       x_minus='';
-elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -E -" will work...'; \
-       $cc -E - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "Yup, it does."
-       x_cpp="$cc -E"
-       x_minus='-';
-elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -P" will work...'; \
-       $cc -P <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "Yipee, that works!"
-       x_cpp="$cc -P"
-       x_minus='';
-elif echo 'Nope...maybe "'"$cc"' -P -" will work...'; \
-       $cc -P - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "At long last!"
-       x_cpp="$cc -P"
-       x_minus='-';
-elif echo 'No such luck, maybe "'$cpp'" will work...'; \
-       $cpp <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "It works!"
-       x_cpp="$cpp"
-       x_minus='';
-elif echo 'Nixed again...maybe "'$cpp' -" will work...'; \
-       $cpp - <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "Hooray, it works!  I was beginning to wonder."
-       x_cpp="$cpp"
-       x_minus='-';
-elif echo 'Uh-uh.  Time to get fancy.  Trying a wrapper...'; \
-       $wrapper <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-       x_cpp="$wrapper"
-       x_minus=''
-       echo "Eureka!"
-else
-       dflt=''
-       rp="No dice.  I can't find a C preprocessor.  Name one:"
-       . ./myread
-       x_cpp="$ans"
-       x_minus=''
-       $x_cpp <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1
-       if $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1 ; then
-               echo "OK, that will do." >&4
-       else
-echo "Sorry, I can't get that to work.  Go find one and rerun Configure." >&4
-               exit 1
-       fi
-fi
-
-case "$ok" in
-false)
-       cppstdin="$x_cpp"
-       cppminus="$x_minus"
-       cpprun="$x_cpp"
-       cpplast="$x_minus"
-       set X $x_cpp
-       shift
-       case "$1" in
-       "$cpp")
-               echo "Perhaps can we force $cc -E using a wrapper..."
-               if $wrapper <testcpp.c >testcpp.out 2>&1; \
-                       $contains 'abc.*xyz' testcpp.out >/dev/null 2>&1
-               then
-                       echo "Yup, we can."
-                       cppstdin="$wrapper"
-                       cppminus='';
-               else
-                       echo "Nope, we'll have to live without it..."
-               fi
-               ;;
-       esac
-       case "$cpprun" in
-       "$wrapper")
-               cpprun=''
-               cpplast=''
-               ;;
-       esac
-       ;;
-esac
-
-case "$cppstdin" in
-"$wrapper") ;;
-*) $rm -f $wrapper;;
-esac
-$rm -f testcpp.c testcpp.out
-
 : determine optimize, if desired, or use for debug flag also
 case "$optimize" in
 ' '|$undef) dflt='none';;
@@ -3957,16 +3933,89 @@ n) echo "OK, that should do.";;
 esac
 $rm -f try try.* core
 
+: Cruising for prototypes
+echo " "
+echo "Checking out function prototypes..." >&4
+$cat >prototype.c <<'EOCP'
+main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
+       exit(0);}
+EOCP
+if $cc $ccflags -c prototype.c >prototype.out 2>&1 ; then
+       echo "Your C compiler appears to support function prototypes."
+       val="$define"
+else
+       echo "Your C compiler doesn't seem to understand function prototypes."
+       val="$undef"
+fi
+set prototype
+eval $setvar
+$rm -f prototype*
+
+case "$prototype" in
+"$define") ;;
+*)     ansi2knr='ansi2knr'
+       echo " "
+       cat <<EOM >&4
+
+$me:  FATAL ERROR:
+This version of $package can only be compiled by a compiler that 
+understands function prototypes.  Unfortunately, your C compiler 
+       $cc $ccflags
+doesn't seem to understand them.  Sorry about that.
+
+If GNU cc is avaiable for your system, perhaps you could try that instead.  
+
+Eventually, we hope to support building Perl with pre-ANSI compilers.
+If you would like to help in that effort, please contact <perlbug@perl.org>.
+
+Aborting Configure now.
+EOM
+       exit 2
+       ;;
+esac
+
+: determine where public executables go
+echo " "
+set dflt bin bin
+eval $prefixit
+fn=d~
+rp='Pathname where the public executables will reside?'
+. ./getfile
+if $test "X$ansexp" != "X$binexp"; then
+       installbin=''
+fi
+bin="$ans"
+binexp="$ansexp"
+if $afs; then
+       $cat <<EOM
+
+Since you are running AFS, I need to distinguish the directory in which
+executables reside from the directory in which they are installed (and from
+which they are presumably copied to the former directory by occult means).
+
+EOM
+       case "$installbin" in
+       '') dflt=`echo $binexp | sed 's#^/afs/#/afs/.#'`;;
+       *) dflt="$installbin";;
+       esac
+       fn=de~
+       rp='Where will public executables be installed?'
+       . ./getfile
+       installbin="$ans"
+else
+       installbin="$binexp"
+fi
+
 : define a shorthand compile call
 compile='
 mc_file=$1;
 shift;
-$cc $optimize $ccflags $ldflags -o ${mc_file}$_exe $* ${mc_file}.c $libs > /dev/null 2>&1;'
+$cc $optimize $ccflags $ldflags -o ${mc_file} $* ${mc_file}.c $libs > /dev/null 2>&1;'
 : define a shorthand compile call for compilations that should be ok.
 compile_ok='
 mc_file=$1;
 shift;
-$cc $optimize $ccflags $ldflags -o ${mc_file}$_exe $* ${mc_file}.c $libs;'
+$cc $optimize $ccflags $ldflags -o ${mc_file} $* ${mc_file}.c $libs;'
 
 echo " "
 echo "Checking for GNU C Library..." >&4
@@ -4012,7 +4061,7 @@ case "$usenm" in
                ;;
        esac
        case "$dflt" in
-       '') dflt=`egrep 'inlibc|csym' ../Configure | wc -l 2>/dev/null`
+       '') dflt=`$egrep 'inlibc|csym' $rsrc/Configure | wc -l 2>/dev/null`
                if $test $dflt -gt 20; then
                        dflt=y
                else
@@ -4758,10 +4807,6 @@ $undef)
                                ;;
                        esac
                        ;;
-               sunos)
-                       dflt=n
-                       also='Building a shared libperl will definitely not work on SunOS 4.'
-                       ;;
                *)      dflt=n
                        ;;
                esac
@@ -6504,7 +6549,7 @@ $define|y|true)
        $cat << EOM
 
 On a few systems, the dynamically loaded modules that perl generates and uses
-will need a different extension then shared libs. The default will probably
+will need a different extension than shared libs. The default will probably
 be appropriate.
 
 EOM
@@ -7185,13 +7230,13 @@ main()
 }
 EOCP
        set try
-       if eval $compile_ok; then
+       if eval $compile; then
                longdblsize=`./try`
                $echo " $longdblsize bytes." >&4
        else
                dflt='8'
                echo " "
-               echo "(I can't seem to compile the test program.  Guessing...)"
+               echo "(I can't seem to compile the test program.  Guessing...)" >&4
                rp="What is the size of a long double (in bytes)?"
                . ./myread
                longdblsize="$ans"
@@ -7558,6 +7603,14 @@ $define)
        set d_pwcomment
        eval $setvar
 
+       if $contains 'pw_gecos' $$.h >/dev/null 2>&1; then
+               val="$define"
+       else
+               val="$undef"
+       fi
+       set d_pwgecos
+       eval $setvar
+
        $rm -f $$.h
        ;;
 *)
@@ -7568,6 +7621,7 @@ $define)
        set d_pwclass; eval $setvar
        set d_pwexpire; eval $setvar
        set d_pwcomment; eval $setvar
+       set d_pwgecos; eval $setvar
        ;;
 esac
 
@@ -8432,6 +8486,9 @@ case "$varval" in
        for inc in $inclist; do
                echo "#include <$inc>" >>temp.c;
        done;
+       echo "#ifdef $type" >> temp.c;
+       echo "printf(\"We have $type\");" >> temp.c;
+       echo "#endif" >> temp.c;
        $cppstdin $cppflags $cppminus < temp.c >temp.E 2>/dev/null;
        if $contains $type temp.E >/dev/null 2>&1; then
                eval "$var=\$type";
@@ -8454,6 +8511,9 @@ case "$varval" in
        for inc in $inclist; do
                echo "#include <$inc>" >>temp.c;
        done;
+       echo "#ifdef $type" >> temp.c;
+       echo "printf(\"We have $type\");" >> temp.c;
+       echo "#endif" >> temp.c;
        $cppstdin $cppflags $cppminus < temp.c >temp.E 2>/dev/null;
        echo " " ;
        echo "$rp" | $sed -e "s/What is/Looking for/" -e "s/?/./";
@@ -9105,7 +9165,7 @@ EOCP
        set try
        if eval $compile_ok; then
                doublesize=`./try`
-               $echo $doublesize >&4
+               $echo " $doublesize bytes." >&4
        else
                dflt='8'
                echo "(I can't seem to compile the test program.  Guessing...)"
@@ -9220,24 +9280,6 @@ rp="What is the type used for file modes for system calls (e.g. fchmod())?"
 set mode_t modetype int stdio.h sys/types.h
 eval $typedef_ask
 
-: Cruising for prototypes
-echo " "
-echo "Checking out function prototypes..." >&4
-$cat >prototype.c <<'EOCP'
-main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
-       exit(0);}
-EOCP
-if $cc $ccflags -c prototype.c >prototype.out 2>&1 ; then
-       echo "Your C compiler appears to support function prototypes."
-       val="$define"
-else
-       echo "Your C compiler doesn't seem to understand function prototypes."
-       val="$undef"
-fi
-set prototype
-eval $setvar
-$rm -f prototype*
-
 : define a fucntion to check prototypes
 $cat > protochk <<EOSH
 $startsh
@@ -10699,7 +10741,7 @@ EOM
                # Perhaps we are reusing an old out-of-date config.sh.
                case "$hint" in
                previous)
-                       if test X"$dynamic_ext" != X$"avail_ext"; then
+                       if test X"$dynamic_ext" != X"$avail_ext"; then
                                $cat <<EOM
 NOTICE:  Your previous config.sh list may be incorrect. 
 The extensions now available to you are 
@@ -10764,7 +10806,7 @@ EOM
                # Perhaps we are reusing an old out-of-date config.sh.
                case "$hint" in
                previous)
-                       if test X"$static_ext" != X$"avail_ext"; then
+                       if test X"$static_ext" != X"$avail_ext"; then
                                $cat <<EOM
 NOTICE:  Your previous config.sh list may be incorrect. 
 The extensions now available to you are 
@@ -10837,7 +10879,9 @@ case "$d_portable" in
        echo " "
        echo "Stripping down executable paths..." >&4
        for file in $loclist $trylist; do
-               eval $file="\$file"
+               if test X$file != Xln -a X$file != Xar -o X$osname != Xos2; then
+                       eval $file="\$file"
+               fi
        done
        ;;
 esac
@@ -10876,6 +10920,7 @@ _exe='$_exe'
 _o='$_o'
 afs='$afs'
 alignbytes='$alignbytes'
+ansi2knr='$ansi2knr'
 aphostname='$aphostname'
 ar='$ar'
 archlib='$archlib'
@@ -11038,6 +11083,7 @@ d_pwchange='$d_pwchange'
 d_pwclass='$d_pwclass'
 d_pwcomment='$d_pwcomment'
 d_pwexpire='$d_pwexpire'
+d_pwgecos='$d_pwgecos'
 d_pwquota='$d_pwquota'
 d_readdir='$d_readdir'
 d_readlink='$d_readlink'
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index f99be4d..f62e4fd 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -170,6 +170,14 @@ be done, system administrators are strongly encouraged to put
 into a directory typically found along a user's PATH, or in another
 obvious and convenient place.
 
+It may seem obvious to say, but Perl is useful only when users can
+easily find it. When possible, it's good for both /usr/bin/perl and
+/usr/local/bin/perl to be symlinks to the actual binary. If that can't
+be done, system administrators are strongly encouraged to put
+(symlinks to) perl and its accompanying utilities, such as perldoc,
+into a directory typically found along a user's PATH, or in another
+obvious and convenient place.
+
 By default, Configure will compile perl to use dynamic loading if
 your system supports it.  If you want to force perl to be compiled
 statically, you can either choose this when Configure prompts you or
@@ -507,6 +515,14 @@ system.  For most users, the defaults are sensible and will work.
 Some users, however, may wish to further customize perl.  Here are
 some of the main things you can change.
 
+=head2 Installing perl under different names
+
+If you want to install perl under a name other than "perl" (for example,
+when installing perl with special features enabled, such as debugging),
+indicate the alternate name on the "make install" line, such as:
+
+    make install PERLNAME=myperl
+
 =head2 Threads
 
 On some platforms, perl5.005 can be compiled to use threads.  To
@@ -1225,6 +1241,8 @@ Note that you can't run the tests in background if this disables
 opening of /dev/tty. You can use 'make test-notty' in that case but
 a few tty tests will be skipped.
 
+=head2 What if make test doesn't work?
+
 If make test bombs out, just cd to the t directory and run ./TEST
 by hand to see if it makes any difference.  If individual tests
 bomb, you can run them by hand, e.g.,
@@ -1242,6 +1260,10 @@ complicated constructs).
 You should also read the individual tests to see if there are any helpful
 comments that apply to your system.
 
+=over 4
+
+=item locale
+
 Note:  One possible reason for errors is that some external programs
 may be broken due to the combination of your environment and the way
 B<make test> exercises them.  For example, this may happen if you have
@@ -1265,6 +1287,29 @@ things like:  exec, `backquoted command`, system, open("|...") or
 open("...|").  All these mean that Perl is trying to run some
 external program.
 
+=item Out of memory
+
+On some systems, particularly those with smaller amounts of RAM, some
+of the tests in t/op/pat.t may fail with an "Out of memory" message.
+Specifically, in perl5.004_64, tests 74 and 78 have been reported to
+fail on some systems.  On my SparcStation IPC with 8 MB of RAM, test 78
+will fail if the system is running any other significant tasks at the
+same time.
+
+Try stopping other jobs on the system and then running the test by itself:
+
+       cd t; ./perl op/pat.t
+
+to see if you have any better luck.  If your perl still fails this
+test, it does not necessarily mean you have a broken perl.  This test
+tries to exercise the regular expression subsystem quite thoroughly,
+and may well be far more demanding than your normal usage.
+
+You may also be able to reduce perl's memory usage by using some of
+the ideas described above in L<"Malloc Performance Flags">.
+
+=back
+
 =head1 make install
 
 This will put perl into the public directory you specified to
@@ -1543,4 +1588,4 @@ above.
 
 =head1 LAST MODIFIED
 
-$Id: INSTALL,v 1.32 1998/03/20 19:20:08 doughera Released $
+$Id: INSTALL,v 1.34 1998/04/23 18:19:41 doughera Released $
index 8830dca..e1365e3 100644 (file)
--- a/MANIFEST
+++ b/MANIFEST
@@ -13,6 +13,7 @@ INTERN.h              Included before domestic .h files
 MANIFEST               This list of files
 Makefile.SH            A script that generates Makefile
 Policy_sh.SH           Hold site-wide preferences between Configure runs.
+Porting/Contract       Social contract for contributed modules in Perl core
 Porting/Glossary       Glossary of config.sh variables
 Porting/config.sh      Sample config.sh
 Porting/config_H       Sample config.h
@@ -21,6 +22,7 @@ Porting/patchls               Flexible patch file listing utility
 Porting/pumpkin.pod    Guidelines and hints for Perl maintainers
 README                 The Instructions
 README.amiga           Notes about AmigaOS port
+README.beos            Notes about BeOS port
 README.cygwin32                Notes about Cygwin32 port
 README.dos             Notes about dos/djgpp port
 README.os2             Notes about OS/2 port
@@ -35,6 +37,7 @@ XSUB.h                        Include file for extension subroutines
 atomic.h               Atomic refcount handling for multi-threading
 av.c                   Array value code
 av.h                   Array value header
+beos/nm.c              BeOS port
 bytecode.h             Bytecode header for compiler
 bytecode.pl            Produces byterun.h, byterun.c and ext/B/Asmdata.pm
 byterun.c              Runtime support for compiler-generated bytecode
@@ -225,8 +228,12 @@ ext/POSIX/Makefile.PL              POSIX extension makefile writer
 ext/POSIX/POSIX.pm             POSIX extension Perl module
 ext/POSIX/POSIX.pod            POSIX extension documentation
 ext/POSIX/POSIX.xs             POSIX extension external subroutines
+ext/POSIX/hints/bsdos.pl       Hint for POSIX for named architecture
+ext/POSIX/hints/freebsd.pl     Hint for POSIX for named architecture
 ext/POSIX/hints/linux.pl       Hint for POSIX for named architecture
+ext/POSIX/hints/netbsd.pl      Hint for POSIX for named architecture
 ext/POSIX/hints/next_3.pl      Hint for POSIX for named architecture
+ext/POSIX/hints/openbsd.pl     Hint for POSIX for named architecture
 ext/POSIX/hints/sunos_4.pl     Hint for POSIX for named architecture
 ext/POSIX/typemap              POSIX extension interface types
 ext/SDBM_File/Makefile.PL      SDBM extension makefile writer
@@ -319,6 +326,7 @@ hints/altos486.sh   Hints for named architecture
 hints/amigaos.sh       Hints for named architecture
 hints/apollo.sh                Hints for named architecture
 hints/aux_3.sh         Hints for named architecture
+hints/beos.sh          Hints for named architecture
 hints/broken-db.msg    Warning message for systems with broken DB library
 hints/bsdos.sh         Hints for named architecture
 hints/convexos.sh      Hints for named architecture
@@ -649,6 +657,7 @@ pod/perlcall.pod    Callback info
 pod/perldata.pod       Data structure info
 pod/perldebug.pod      Debugger info
 pod/perldelta.pod      Changes since last version
+pod/perldelta4.pod     Changes from 5.003 to 5.004
 pod/perldiag.pod       Diagnostic info
 pod/perldsc.pod                Data Structures Cookbook
 pod/perlembed.pod      Embedding info
@@ -908,6 +917,7 @@ utils/perlbug.PL    A simple tool to submit a bug report
 utils/perldoc.PL       A simple tool to find & display perl's documentation
 utils/pl2pm.PL         A pl to pm translator
 utils/splain.PL                Stand-alone version of diagnostics.pm
+utils/perlcc.PL                Front-end for compiler
 vms/config.vms         default config.h for VMS
 vms/descrip.mms                MM[SK] description file for build
 vms/ext/DCLsym/0README.txt     ReadMe file for VMS::DCLsym
index c1689cd..a70b53e 100644 (file)
@@ -25,8 +25,13 @@ esac
 
 linklibperl='$(LIBPERL)'
 shrpldflags='$(LDDLFLAGS)'
+ldlibpth=''
 case "$useshrplib" in
 true)
+       # Prefix all runs of 'miniperl' and 'perl' with 
+       # $ldlibpth so that ./perl finds *this* libperl.so.
+       ldlibpth="LD_LIBRARY_PATH=`pwd`:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH"
+
        pldlflags="$cccdlflags"
        # NeXT-4 specific stuff.  Can't we do this in the hint file?
        case "${osname}${osvers}" in
@@ -35,6 +40,11 @@ true)
                lddlflags="-dynamic -undefined warning -framework System \
                -compatibility_version 1 -current_version $patchlevel \
                -prebind -seg1addr 0x27000000 -install_name \$(shrpdir)/\$@"
+               # NeXT uses a different name.
+               ldlibpth="DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH=`pwd`:$DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH"
+               ;;
+       os2*)   # OS/2 doesn't need anything special for LD_LIBRARY_PATH.
+               ldlibpth=''
                ;;
        sunos*|freebsd[23]*|netbsd*)
                linklibperl="-lperl"
@@ -124,6 +134,10 @@ LIBPERL = $libperl
 LLIBPERL= $linklibperl
 SHRPENV = $shrpenv
 
+# The following is used to include the current directory in
+# LD_LIBRARY_PATH if you are building a shared libperl.so.
+LDLIBPTH = $ldlibpth
+
 dynamic_ext = $dynamic_list
 static_ext = $static_list
 ext = \$(dynamic_ext) \$(static_ext)
@@ -219,11 +233,17 @@ lintflags = -hbvxac
 all: $(FIRSTMAKEFILE) miniperl $(private) $(plextract) $(public) $(dynamic_ext)
        @echo " "; echo "       Everything is up to date."
 
+compile: all
+       echo "testing compilation" > testcompile;
+       cd utils;  $(MAKE) compile;
+       cd x2p; $(MAKE) compile; 
+       cd pod; $(MAKE) compile;
+
 translators:   miniperl lib/Config.pm FORCE
-       @echo " "; echo "       Making x2p stuff"; cd x2p; $(MAKE) all
+       @echo " "; echo "       Making x2p stuff"; cd x2p; $(LDLIBPTH) $(MAKE) all
 
 utilities:     miniperl lib/Config.pm FORCE
-       @echo " "; echo "       Making utilities"; cd utils; $(MAKE) all
+       @echo " "; echo "       Making utilities"; cd utils; $(LDLIBPTH) $(MAKE) all
 
 
 # This is now done by installman only if you actually want the man pages.
@@ -299,20 +319,20 @@ $(LIBPERL): $& perl$(OBJ_EXT) $(obj)
 # The Module used here must not depend on Config or any extensions.
 
 miniperl: $& miniperlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL)
-       $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) -o miniperl miniperlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LLIBPERL) $(libs)
-       @./miniperl -w -Ilib -MExporter -e 0 || $(MAKE) minitest
+       $(LDLIBPTH) $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) -o miniperl miniperlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LLIBPERL) $(libs)
+       @ $(LDLIBPTH) ./miniperl -w -Ilib -MExporter -e 0 || $(MAKE) minitest
 
 perl: $& perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
-       $(SHRPENV) $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o perl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
+       $(SHRPENV) $(LDLIBPTH) $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o perl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
 
 pureperl: $& perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
-       $(SHRPENV) purify $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o pureperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
+       $(SHRPENV) $(LDLIBPTH) purify $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o pureperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
 
 purecovperl: $& perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
-       $(SHRPENV) purecov $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o purecovperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
+       $(SHRPENV) $(LDLIBPTH) purecov $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o purecovperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
 
 quantperl: $& perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
-       $(SHRPENV) quantify $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o quantperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
+       $(SHRPENV) $(LDLIBPTH) quantify $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o quantperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
 
 # This version, if specified in Configure, does ONLY those scripts which need
 # set-id emulation.  Suidperl must be setuid root.  It contains the "taint"
@@ -320,7 +340,7 @@ quantperl: $& perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
 # has been invoked correctly.
 
 suidperl: $& sperl$(OBJ_EXT) perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) $(LIBPERL) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) ext.libs
-       $(SHRPENV) $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o suidperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) sperl$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
+       $(SHRPENV) $(LDLIBPTH) $(CC) $(LARGE) $(CLDFLAGS) $(CCDLFLAGS) -o suidperl perlmain$(OBJ_EXT) sperl$(OBJ_EXT) $(DYNALOADER) $(static_ext) $(LLIBPERL) `cat ext.libs` $(libs)
 
 !NO!SUBS!
 
@@ -340,34 +360,40 @@ sperl$(OBJ_EXT): perl.c perly.h patchlevel.h $(h)
 preplibrary: miniperl lib/Config.pm $(plextract)
        @sh ./makedir lib/auto
        @echo " AutoSplitting perl library"
-       @./miniperl -Ilib -e 'use AutoSplit; \
+       @$(LDLIBPTH) ./miniperl -Ilib -e 'use AutoSplit; \
                autosplit_lib_modules(@ARGV)' lib/*.pm lib/*/*.pm
 
 # Take care to avoid modifying lib/Config.pm without reason
 # (If trying to create a new port and having problems with the configpm script, 
 # try 'make minitest' and/or commenting out the tests at the end of configpm.)
 lib/Config.pm: config.sh miniperl configpm
-       ./miniperl configpm tmp
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./miniperl configpm tmp
        sh mv-if-diff tmp lib/Config.pm
 
 lib/ExtUtils/Miniperl.pm: miniperlmain.c miniperl minimod.pl lib/Config.pm
-       ./miniperl minimod.pl > tmp && mv tmp $@
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./miniperl minimod.pl > tmp && mv tmp $@
 
 $(plextract):  miniperl lib/Config.pm
-       `echo ./miniperl -Ilib $@.PL`
-
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./miniperl -Ilib $@.PL
+       
 install: all install.perl install.man
 
 install.perl:  all installperl
-       ./perl installperl
+       if [ -n "$(COMPILE)" ]; \
+       then \
+               cd utils; $(MAKE) compile; \
+               cd ../x2p; $(MAKE) compile; \
+               cd ../pod; $(MAKE) compile; \
+       fi
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl installperl
 
 install.man:   all installman
-       ./perl installman
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl installman
 
 # XXX Experimental. Hardwired values, but useful for testing.
 # Eventually Configure could ask for some of these values.
 install.html: all installhtml
-       ./perl installhtml                   \
+       $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl installhtml                   \
       --podroot=. --podpath=. --recurse  \
       --htmldir=$(privlib)/html     \
       --htmlroot=$(privlib)/html    \
@@ -438,13 +464,13 @@ regen_headers:    FORCE
 # DynaLoader may be needed for extensions that use Makefile.PL.
 
 $(DYNALOADER): miniperl preplibrary FORCE
-       @sh ext/util/make_ext static $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
+       @$(LDLIBPTH) sh ext/util/make_ext static $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
 
 d_dummy $(dynamic_ext):        miniperl preplibrary $(DYNALOADER) FORCE
-       @sh ext/util/make_ext dynamic $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
+       @$(LDLIBPTH) sh ext/util/make_ext dynamic $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
 
 s_dummy $(static_ext): miniperl preplibrary $(DYNALOADER) FORCE
-       @sh ext/util/make_ext static $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
+       @$(LDLIBPTH) sh ext/util/make_ext static $@ MAKE=$(MAKE) LIBPERL_A=$(LIBPERL)
 
 clean:         _tidy _mopup
 
@@ -471,6 +497,7 @@ _tidy:
        -@for x in $(DYNALOADER) $(dynamic_ext) $(static_ext) ; do \
        sh ext/util/make_ext clean $$x MAKE=$(MAKE) ; \
        done
+       rm -f testcompile compilelog
 
 # Do not 'make _cleaner' directly.
 _cleaner:
@@ -489,6 +516,7 @@ _cleaner:
        rm -f lib/.exists
        rm -f h2ph.man pstruct
        rm -rf .config
+       rm -f testcompile compilelog
 
 # The following lint has practically everything turned on.  Unfortunately,
 # you have to wade through a lot of mumbo jumbo that can't be suppressed.
@@ -528,11 +556,11 @@ test-prep: miniperl perl preplibrary $(dynamic_ext)
        cd t && (rm -f perl$(EXE_EXT); $(LNS) ../perl$(EXE_EXT) perl$(EXE_EXT))
 
 test check: test-prep
-       cd t && ./perl TEST </dev/tty
+       cd t && $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl TEST </dev/tty
 
 # For testing without a tty or controling terminal. See t/op/stat.t
 test-notty: test-prep
-       cd t && PERL_SKIP_TTY_TEST=1 ./perl TEST
+       cd t && PERL_SKIP_TTY_TEST=1 $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl TEST
 
 # Can't depend on lib/Config.pm because that might be where miniperl
 # is crashing.
@@ -540,14 +568,14 @@ minitest: miniperl
        @echo "You may see some irrelevant test failures if you have been unable"
        @echo "to build lib/Config.pm."
        - cd t && (rm -f perl$(EXE_EXT); $(LNS) ../miniperl$(EXE_EXT) perl$(EXE_EXT)) \
-               && ./perl TEST base/*.t comp/*.t cmd/*.t io/*.t op/*.t pragma/*.t </dev/tty
+               && $(LDLIBPTH) ./perl TEST base/*.t comp/*.t cmd/*.t io/*.t op/*.t pragma/*.t </dev/tty
 
 # Handy way to run perlbug -ok without having to install and run the
 # installed perlbug. We don't re-run the tests here - we trust the user.
 # Please *don't* use this unless all tests pass.
 # If you want to report test failures, just use "perlbug -Ilib".
 ok:    utilities
-       ./perl -Ilib utils/perlbug -ok -s '(UNINSTALLED)'
+       $(LBLIBPTH) ./perl -Ilib utils/perlbug -ok -s '(UNINSTALLED)'
 
 clist: $(c)
        echo $(c) | tr ' ' '\012' >.clist
index acac3ed..4ae0bb1 100644 (file)
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ esac
 # Installation directives.  Note that each one comes in three flavors.
 # For example, we have privlib, privlibexp, and installprivlib.
 # privlib is for private (to perl) library files.
-# privlibexp is the same, expcept any '~' the user gave to Configure
+# privlibexp is the same, except any '~' the user gave to Configure
 #     is expanded to the user's home directory.  This is figured
 #     out automatically by Configure, so you don't have to include it here.
 # installprivlib is for systems (such as those running AFS) that
@@ -82,7 +82,13 @@ for var in bin scriptdir privlib archlib \
     case "$var" in
     bin)       dflt=$prefix/bin ;;
     # The scriptdir test is more complex, but this is probably usually ok.
-    scriptdir) dflt=$prefix/script ;;
+    scriptdir)
+       if $test -d $prefix/script; then
+           dflt=$prefix/script
+       else
+           dflt=$bin
+       fi
+       ;;
     privlib)
        case "$prefix" in
        *perl*) dflt=$prefix/lib ;;
@@ -97,7 +103,7 @@ for var in bin scriptdir privlib archlib \
        case "$prefix" in
        *perl*) dflt=`echo $man1dir |
                    sed -e 's/man1/man3/g' -e 's/man\.1/man\.3/g'` ;;
-       *)      dflt=$privlib/man3 ;;
+       *)      dflt=$privlib/man/man3 ;;
        esac
        ;;
 
@@ -122,7 +128,6 @@ for var in bin scriptdir privlib archlib \
        echo "# $var='$dflt'"
     else
        echo "# Preserving custom $var"
-       eval val=$var
        echo "$var='$val'"
     fi
 
diff --git a/Porting/Contract b/Porting/Contract
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..75a24a7
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,103 @@
+                     Contributed Modules in Perl Core
+                 A Social Contract about Artistic Control
+
+What follows is a statement about artistic control, defined as the ability
+of authors of packages to guide the future of their code and maintain
+control over their work.  It is a recognition that authors should have
+control over their work, and that it is a responsibility of the rest of
+the Perl community to ensure that they retain this control.  It is an
+attempt to document the standards to which we, as Perl developers, intend
+to hold ourselves.  It is an attempt to write down rough guidelines about
+the respect we owe each other as Perl developers.
+
+This statement is not a legal contract.  This statement is not a legal
+document in any way, shape, or form.  Perl is distributed under the GNU
+Public License and under the Artistic License; those are the precise legal
+terms.  This statement isn't about the law or licenses.  It's about
+community, mutual respect, trust, and good-faith cooperation.
+
+We recognize that the Perl core, defined as the software distributed with
+the heart of Perl itself, is a joint project on the part of all of us.
+>From time to time, a script, module, or set of modules (hereafter referred
+to simply as a "module") will prove so widely useful and/or so integral to
+the correct functioning of Perl itself that it should be distributed with
+Perl core.  This should never be done without the author's explicit
+consent, and a clear recognition on all parts that this means the module
+is being distributed under the same terms as Perl itself.  A module author
+should realize that inclusion of a module into the Perl core will
+necessarily mean some loss of control over it, since changes may
+occasionally have to be made on short notice or for consistency with the
+rest of Perl.
+
+Once a module has been included in the Perl core, however, everyone
+involved in maintaining Perl should be aware that the module is still the
+property of the original author unless the original author explicitly
+gives up their ownership of it.  In particular:
+
+ 1) The version of the module in the core should still be considered the
+    work of the original author.  All patches, bug reports, and so forth
+    should be fed back to them.  Their development directions should be
+    respected whenever possible.
+
+ 2) Patches may be applied by the pumpkin holder without the explicit
+    cooperation of the module author if and only if they are very minor,
+    time-critical in some fashion (such as urgent security fixes), or if
+    the module author cannot be reached.  Those patches must still be
+    given back to the author when possible, and if the author decides on
+    an alternate fix in their version, that fix should be strongly
+    preferred unless there is a serious problem with it.  Any changes not
+    endorsed by the author should be marked as such, and the contributor
+    of the change acknowledged.
+
+ 3) The version of the module distributed with Perl should, whenever
+    possible, be the latest version of the module as distributed by the
+    author (the latest non-beta version in the case of public Perl
+    releases), although the pumpkin holder may hold off on upgrading the
+    version of the module distributed with Perl to the latest version
+    until the latest version has had sufficient testing.
+
+In other words, the author of a module should be considered to have final
+say on modifications to their module whenever possible (bearing in mind
+that it's expected that everyone involved will work together and arrive at
+reasonable compromises when there are disagreements).
+
+As a last resort, however:
+
+ 4) If the author's vision of the future of their module is sufficiently
+    different from the vision of the pumpkin holder and perl5-porters as a
+    whole so as to cause serious problems for Perl, the pumpkin holder may
+    choose to formally fork the version of the module in the core from the
+    one maintained by the author.  This should not be done lightly and
+    should *always* if at all possible be done only after direct input
+    from Larry.  If this is done, it must then be made explicit in the
+    module as distributed with Perl core that it is a forked version and
+    that while it is based on the original author's work, it is no longer
+    maintained by them.  This must be noted in both the documentation and
+    in the comments in the source of the module.
+
+Again, this should be a last resort only.  Ideally, this should never
+happen, and every possible effort at cooperation and compromise should be
+made before doing this.  If it does prove necessary to fork a module for
+the overall health of Perl, proper credit must be given to the original
+author in perpetuity and the decision should be constantly re-evaluated to
+see if a remerging of the two branches is possible down the road.
+
+In all dealings with contributed modules, everyone maintaining Perl should
+keep in mind that the code belongs to the original author, that they may
+not be on perl5-porters at any given time, and that a patch is not
+official unless it has been integrated into the author's copy of the
+module.  To aid with this, and with points #1, #2, and #3 above, contact
+information for the authors of all contributed modules should be kept with
+the Perl distribution.
+
+Finally, the Perl community as a whole recognizes that respect for
+ownership of code, respect for artistic control, proper credit, and active
+effort to prevent unintentional code skew or communication gaps is vital
+to the health of the community and Perl itself.  Members of a community
+should not normally have to resort to rules and laws to deal with each
+other, and this document, although it contains rules so as to be clear, is
+about an attitude and general approach.  The first step in any dispute
+should be open communication, respect for opposing views, and an attempt
+at a compromise.  In nearly every circumstance nothing more will be
+necessary, and certainly no more drastic measure should be used until
+every avenue of communication and discussion has failed.
index 6a37060..15ca4f9 100644 (file)
@@ -26,6 +26,10 @@ alignbytes (alignbytes.U):
        This variable holds the number of bytes required to align a
        double. Usual values are 2, 4 and 8.
 
+ansi2knr (ansi2knr.U):
+       This variable is set if the user needs to run ansi2knr.  
+       Currently, this is not supported, so we just abort.
+
 aphostname (d_gethname.U):
        Thie variable contains the command which can be used to compute the
        host name. The command is fully qualified by its absolute path, to make
@@ -699,27 +703,31 @@ d_pthreads_created_joinable (d_pthreadj.U):
        state.
 
 d_pwage (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWAGE, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWAGE, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_age.
 
 d_pwchange (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWCHANGE, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWCHANGE, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_change.
 
 d_pwclass (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWCLASS, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWCLASS, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_class.
 
 d_pwcomment (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWCOMMENT, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWCOMMENT, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_comment.
 
 d_pwexpire (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWEXPIRE, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWEXPIRE, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_expire.
 
+d_pwgecos (i_pwd.U):
+       This variable conditionally defines PWGECOS, which indicates
+       that struct passwd contains pw_gecos.
+
 d_pwquota (i_pwd.U):
-       This varaible conditionally defines PWQUOTA, which indicates
+       This variable conditionally defines PWQUOTA, which indicates
        that struct passwd contains pw_quota.
 
 d_readdir (d_readdir.U):
index ff4f725..69da4a9 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@
 
 # Package name      : perl5
 # Source directory  : .
-# Configuration time: Tue Mar 31 15:51:58 EST 1998
+# Configuration time: Wed May 13 13:36:52 EDT 1998
 # Configured by     : doughera
 # Target system     : linux fractal 2.0.33 #1 tue feb 3 10:11:46 est 1998 i686 unknown 
 
@@ -28,10 +28,11 @@ _exe=''
 _o='.o'
 afs='false'
 alignbytes='4'
+ansi2knr=''
 aphostname=''
 ar='ar'
-archlib='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00463'
-archlibexp='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00463'
+archlib='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00464'
+archlibexp='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00464'
 archname='i686-linux-thread'
 archobjs=''
 awk='awk'
@@ -51,7 +52,7 @@ ccdlflags='-rdynamic'
 ccflags='-D_REENTRANT -Dbool=char -DHAS_BOOL -I/usr/local/include'
 cf_by='doughera'
 cf_email='yourname@yourhost.yourplace.com'
-cf_time='Tue Mar 31 15:51:58 EST 1998'
+cf_time='Wed May 13 13:36:52 EDT 1998'
 chgrp=''
 chmod=''
 chown=''
@@ -190,6 +191,7 @@ d_pwchange='undef'
 d_pwclass='undef'
 d_pwcomment='undef'
 d_pwexpire='undef'
+d_pwgecos='define'
 d_pwquota='undef'
 d_readdir='define'
 d_readlink='define'
@@ -370,7 +372,7 @@ i_varhdr='stdarg.h'
 i_vfork='undef'
 incpath=''
 inews=''
-installarchlib='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00463'
+installarchlib='/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00464'
 installbin='/opt/perl/bin'
 installman1dir='/opt/perl/man/man1'
 installman3dir='/opt/perl/man/man3'
@@ -516,7 +518,7 @@ stdio_filbuf=''
 stdio_ptr='((fp)->_IO_read_ptr)'
 strings='/usr/include/string.h'
 submit=''
-subversion='63'
+subversion='64'
 sysman='/usr/man/man1'
 tail=''
 tar=''
@@ -549,5 +551,5 @@ xlibpth='/usr/lib/386 /lib/386'
 zcat=''
 zip='zip'
 PATCHLEVEL=4
-SUBVERSION=63
+SUBVERSION=64
 CONFIG=true
index 2f07d01..de0cfd6 100644 (file)
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@
 /*
  * Package name      : perl5
  * Source directory  : .
- * Configuration time: Tue Mar 31 15:51:58 EST 1998
+ * Configuration time: Wed May 13 13:36:52 EDT 1998
  * Configured by     : doughera
  * Target system     : linux fractal 2.0.33 #1 tue feb 3 10:11:46 est 1998 i686 unknown 
  */
  */
 #define I_NETINET_IN   /**/
 
-/* I_PWD:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
- *     include <pwd.h>.
- */
-/* PWQUOTA:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_quota.
- */
-/* PWAGE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_age.
- */
-/* PWCHANGE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_change.
- */
-/* PWCLASS:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_class.
- */
-/* PWEXPIRE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_expire.
- */
-/* PWCOMMENT:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_comment.
- */
-#define I_PWD          /**/
-/*#define PWQUOTA      / **/
-/*#define PWAGE        / **/
-/*#define PWCHANGE     / **/
-/*#define PWCLASS      / **/
-/*#define PWEXPIRE     / **/
-/*#define PWCOMMENT    / **/
-
 /* I_SFIO:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
  *     include <sfio.h>.
  *     This symbol contains the ~name expanded version of ARCHLIB, to be used
  *     in programs that are not prepared to deal with ~ expansion at run-time.
  */
-#define ARCHLIB "/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00463"              /**/
-#define ARCHLIB_EXP "/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00463"          /**/
+#define ARCHLIB "/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00464"              /**/
+#define ARCHLIB_EXP "/opt/perl/lib/i686-linux-thread/5.00464"          /**/
 
 /* CAT2:
  *     This macro catenates 2 tokens together.
  */
 #define I_NETDB                /**/
 
+/* I_PWD:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
+ *     include <pwd.h>.
+ */
+/* PWQUOTA:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_quota.
+ */
+/* PWAGE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_age.
+ */
+/* PWCHANGE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_change.
+ */
+/* PWCLASS:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_class.
+ */
+/* PWEXPIRE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_expire.
+ */
+/* PWCOMMENT:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_comment.
+ */
+/* PWGECOS:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_gecos.
+ */
+#define I_PWD          /**/
+/*#define PWQUOTA      / **/
+/*#define PWAGE        / **/
+/*#define PWCHANGE     / **/
+/*#define PWCLASS      / **/
+/*#define PWEXPIRE     / **/
+/*#define PWCOMMENT    / **/
+#define PWGECOS        /**/
+
 /* I_SYS_TYPES:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
  *     include <sys/types.h>.
 #define PRIVLIB "/opt/perl/lib"                /**/
 #define PRIVLIB_EXP "/opt/perl/lib"            /**/
 
+/* SIG_NAME:
+ *     This symbol contains a list of signal names in order of
+ *     signal number. This is intended
+ *     to be used as a static array initialization, like this:
+ *             char *sig_name[] = { SIG_NAME };
+ *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and each signal
+ *     is surrounded by double quotes. There is no leading SIG in the signal
+ *     name, i.e. SIGQUIT is known as "QUIT".
+ *     Gaps in the signal numbers (up to NSIG) are filled in with NUMnn,
+ *     etc., where nn is the actual signal number (e.g. NUM37).
+ *     The signal number for sig_name[i] is stored in sig_num[i].
+ *     The last element is 0 to terminate the list with a NULL.  This
+ *     corresponds to the 0 at the end of the sig_num list.
+ */
+/* SIG_NUM:
+ *     This symbol contains a list of signal numbers, in the same order as the
+ *     SIG_NAME list. It is suitable for static array initialization, as in:
+ *             int sig_num[] = { SIG_NUM };
+ *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and the indices
+ *     within that list and the SIG_NAME list match, so it's easy to compute
+ *     the signal name from a number or vice versa at the price of a small
+ *     dynamic linear lookup. 
+ *     Duplicates are allowed, but are moved to the end of the list.
+ *     The signal number corresponding to sig_name[i] is sig_number[i].
+ *     if (i < NSIG) then sig_number[i] == i.  
+ *     The last element is 0, corresponding to the 0 at the end of
+ *     the sig_name list.
+ */
+#define SIG_NAME "ZERO", "HUP", "INT", "QUIT", "ILL", "TRAP", "ABRT", "BUS", "FPE", "KILL", "USR1", "SEGV", "USR2", "PIPE", "ALRM", "TERM", "STKFLT", "CHLD", "CONT", "STOP", "TSTP", "TTIN", "TTOU", "URG", "XCPU", "XFSZ", "VTALRM", "PROF", "WINCH", "IO", "PWR", "UNUSED", "IOT", "CLD", "POLL", 0         /**/
+#define SIG_NUM  0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 6, 17, 29, 0                    /**/
+
 /* SITEARCH:
  *     This symbol contains the name of the private library for this package.
  *     The library is private in the sense that it needn't be in anyone's
  */
 #define Select_fd_set_t        fd_set *        /**/
 
-/* SIG_NAME:
- *     This symbol contains a list of signal names in order of
- *     signal number. This is intended
- *     to be used as a static array initialization, like this:
- *             char *sig_name[] = { SIG_NAME };
- *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and each signal
- *     is surrounded by double quotes. There is no leading SIG in the signal
- *     name, i.e. SIGQUIT is known as "QUIT".
- *     Gaps in the signal numbers (up to NSIG) are filled in with NUMnn,
- *     etc., where nn is the actual signal number (e.g. NUM37).
- *     The signal number for sig_name[i] is stored in sig_num[i].
- *     The last element is 0 to terminate the list with a NULL.  This
- *     corresponds to the 0 at the end of the sig_num list.
- */
-/* SIG_NUM:
- *     This symbol contains a list of signal numbers, in the same order as the
- *     SIG_NAME list. It is suitable for static array initialization, as in:
- *             int sig_num[] = { SIG_NUM };
- *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and the indices
- *     within that list and the SIG_NAME list match, so it's easy to compute
- *     the signal name from a number or vice versa at the price of a small
- *     dynamic linear lookup. 
- *     Duplicates are allowed, but are moved to the end of the list.
- *     The signal number corresponding to sig_name[i] is sig_number[i].
- *     if (i < NSIG) then sig_number[i] == i.  
- *     The last element is 0, corresponding to the 0 at the end of
- *     the sig_name list.
- */
-#define SIG_NAME "ZERO", "HUP", "INT", "QUIT", "ILL", "TRAP", "ABRT", "BUS", "FPE", "KILL", "USR1", "SEGV", "USR2", "PIPE", "ALRM", "TERM", "STKFLT", "CHLD", "CONT", "STOP", "TSTP", "TTIN", "TTOU", "URG", "XCPU", "XFSZ", "VTALRM", "PROF", "WINCH", "IO", "PWR", "UNUSED", "IOT", "CLD", "POLL", 0         /**/
-#define SIG_NUM  0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 6, 17, 29, 0                    /**/
-
 /* ARCHNAME:
  *     This symbol holds a string representing the architecture name.
  *     It may be used to construct an architecture-dependant pathname
  *     routine is available to yield the execution of the current
  *     thread.
  */
+/* HAS_SCHED_YIELD:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates that the sched_yield
+ *     routine is available to yield the execution of the current
+ *     thread.
+ */
 /*#define HAS_PTHREAD_YIELD    / **/
+#define HAS_SCHED_YIELD        /**/
 
 /* PTHREADS_CREATED_JOINABLE:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates that pthreads are created
index 27cf119..724f1ba 100644 (file)
@@ -508,6 +508,9 @@ You might like, early in your pumpkin-holding career, to see if you
 can find champions for partiticular issues on the to-do list: an issue
 owned is an issue more likely to be resolved.
 
+There are also some more porting-specific L<Todo> items later in this
+file.
+
 =head2 OS/2-specific updates
 
 In the os2 directory is F<diff.configure>, a set of OS/2-specific
@@ -1071,6 +1074,62 @@ distribution modules.  If you do
 
 then perl.c will put /my/override ahead of ARCHLIB and PRIVLIB.
 
+=head2 Shared libperl.so location
+
+Why isn't the shared libperl.so installed in /usr/lib/ along
+with "all the other" shared libraries?  Instead, it is installed
+in $archlib, which is typically something like
+
+       /usr/local/lib/perl5/archname/5.00404
+
+and is architecture- and version-specific.
+
+The basic reason why a shared libperl.so gets put in $archlib is so that
+you can have more than one version of perl on the system at the same time,
+and have each refer to its own libperl.so.
+
+Three examples might help.  All of these work now; none would work if you
+put libperl.so in /usr/lib.
+
+=over
+
+=item 1.
+
+Suppose you want to have both threaded and non-threaded perl versions
+around.  Configure will name both perl libraries "libperl.so" (so that
+you can link to them with -lperl).  The perl binaries tell them apart
+by having looking in the appropriate $archlib directories.
+
+=item 2.
+
+Suppose you have perl5.004_04 installed and you want to try to compile
+it again, perhaps with different options or after applying a patch.
+If you already have libperl.so installed in /usr/lib/, then it may be
+either difficult or impossible to get ld.so to find the new libperl.so
+that you're trying to build.  If, instead, libperl.so is tucked away in
+$archlib, then you can always just change $archlib in the current perl
+you're trying to build so that ld.so won't find your old libperl.so.
+(The INSTALL file suggests you do this when building a debugging perl.)
+
+=item 3.
+
+The shared perl library is not a "well-behaved" shared library with
+proper major and minor version numbers, so you can't necessarily
+have perl5.004_04 and perl5.004_05 installed simultaneously.  Suppose
+perl5.004_04 were to install /usr/lib/libperl.so.4.4, and perl5.004_05
+were to install /usr/lib/libperl.so.4.5.  Now, when you try to run
+perl5.004_04, ld.so might try to load libperl.so.4.5, since it has
+the right "major version" number.  If this works at all, it almost
+certainly defeats the reason for keeping perl5.004_04 around.  Worse,
+with development subversions, you certaily can't guarantee that
+libperl.so.4.4 and libperl.so.4.55 will be compatible.
+
+Anyway, all this leads to quite obscure failures that are sure to drive
+casual users crazy.  Even experienced users will get confused :-).  Upon
+reflection, I'd say leave libperl.so in $archlib.
+
+=back
+
 =head1 Upload Your Work to CPAN
 
 You can upload your work to CPAN if you have a CPAN id.  Check out
@@ -1114,12 +1173,13 @@ described in F<INSTALL>.  AFS users also are treated specially.
 We should probably duplicate the metaconfig prefix stuff for an
 install prefix.
 
-=item Configure -Dsrcdir=/blah/blah
+=item Configure -Dsrc=/blah/blah
 
 We should be able to emulate B<configure --srcdir>.  Tom Tromey
 tromey@creche.cygnus.com has submitted some patches to
-the dist-users mailing list along these lines.  Eventually, they ought
-to get folded back into the main distribution.
+the dist-users mailing list along these lines.  They have been folded
+back into the main distribution, but various parts of the perl
+Configure/build/install process still assume src='.'.
 
 =item Hint file fixes
 
@@ -1131,6 +1191,47 @@ Configure so that most of them aren't needed.
 Some of the hint file information (particularly dynamic loading stuff)
 ought to be fed back into the main metaconfig distribution.
 
+=item Catch GNU Libc "Stub" functions
+
+Some functions (such as lchown()) are present in libc, but are
+unimplmented.  That is, they always fail and set errno=ENOSYS.
+
+Thomas Bushnell provided the following sample code and the explanation
+that follows:
+
+    /* System header to define __stub macros and hopefully few prototypes,
+       which can conflict with char FOO(); below.  */
+    #include <assert.h>
+    /* Override any gcc2 internal prototype to avoid an error.  */
+    /* We use char because int might match the return type of a gcc2
+       builtin and then its argument prototype would still apply.  */
+    char FOO();
+
+    int main() {
+
+    /* The GNU C library defines this for functions which it implements
+       to always fail with ENOSYS.  Some functions are actually named
+       something starting with __ and the normal name is an alias.  */
+    #if defined (__stub_FOO) || defined (__stub___FOO)
+    choke me
+    #else
+    FOO();
+    #endif
+
+    ; return 0; }
+
+The choice of <assert.h> is essentially arbitrary.  The GNU libc
+macros are found in <gnu/stubs.h>.  You can include that file instead
+of <assert.h> (which itself includes <gnu/stubs.h>) if you test for
+its existence first.  <assert.h> is assumed to exist on every system,
+which is why it's used here.  Any GNU libc header file will include
+the stubs macros.  If either __stub_NAME or __stub___NAME is defined,
+then the function doesn't actually exist.  Tests using <assert.h> work
+on every system around.
+
+The declaration of FOO is there to override builtin prototypes for
+ANSI C functions.
+
 =back
 
 =head2 Probably good ideas waiting for round tuits
@@ -1176,12 +1277,6 @@ Get some of the Macintosh stuff folded back into the main distribution.
 Maybe include a replacement function that doesn't lose data in rare
 cases of coercion between string and numerical values.
 
-=item long long
-
-Can we support C<long long> on systems where C<long long> is larger
-than what we've been using for C<IV>?  What if you can't C<sprintf>
-a C<long long>?
-
 =item Improve makedepend
 
 The current makedepend process is clunky and annoyingly slow, but it
@@ -1218,4 +1313,4 @@ All opinions expressed herein are those of the authorZ<>(s).
 
 =head1 LAST MODIFIED
 
-$Id: pumpkin.pod,v 1.14 1998/03/03 17:14:47 doughera Released $
+$Id: pumpkin.pod,v 1.15 1998/04/23 17:03:48 doughera Released $
diff --git a/README.beos b/README.beos
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..8c24393
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,75 @@
+$Id: README.beos,v 1.2 1998/05/02 01:55:04 dogcow Exp dogcow $
+
+Notes on building perl under BeOS:
+
+GENERAL ISSUES
+--------------
+perl will almost compile straight out of the box with ./Configure -d, but
+there are a few gotchas:
+
+Currently, you have to edit config.sh and remove SDBM_File from the
+dynamic_ext= and extensions= lines. SDBM_File does not build properly
+at this time. You need to run ./Configure -S after editing config.sh.
+
+In addition, with mwcc, after doing `make depend`, you need to edit
+makefile and x2p/makefile and remove the lines that mention 'Bletch:'.
+This is not necessary if you're using gnu cpp.
+
+in short:
+./Configure -d
+remove SDBM_File from config.sh
+./Configure -S
+make depend
+remove Bletch: from makefile and x2p/makefile
+make
+
+Other than that, perl should build without problems. There are some
+technical comments in hints/beos.sh.
+
+OS RELEASE-SPECIFIC NOTES
+-------------------------
+
+PR1/PPC:
+See R3/X86. Same bug, different form.
+
+PR2/PPC:
+Signals are somewhat unreliable, but they can work. Use caution.
+The POSIX module is still somewhat buggy.
+
+R3/X86:
+Under R3 x86, there are some serious problems with the math routines
+such that numbers are incorrectly printed. This causes problems with
+modules that encode their version numbers - in particular, IO.pm will
+probably not work properly. This should be fixed under R3.1.
+
+The problem has manifested itself if you see something similar to the
+following during the compile:
+
+cc -c  -I/usr/local/include -O    -DVERSION=\"1.1504\" -DXS_VERSION=\"1.1499999999\" -fpic -I../..  IO.c
+(lots of 9's are the indication of the problem.)
+
+In the meantime, you can use the following workaround:
+
+make perl
+cd ext/IO
+cc -c  -I/usr/local/include -O    -DVERSION=\"1.1504\" -DXS_VERSION=\"1.15\" -fpic -I../..  IO.c
+cd ..
+make
+
+(Substitute the correct numbers if IO has been updated.)
+
+R3/PPC-
+There's math problems, but of a different kind. In particular,
+perl -e 'print (240000 - (3e4<<3))' gives a non-zero answer.
+I'm looking into this. There is no workaround as yet. Hopefully,
+this will be fixed in R3.1.
+
+CONTACT INFORMATION
+-------------------
+If you have comments, problem reports, or even patches or bugfixes (gasp!)
+please email me.
+
+1 May 1998
+Tom Spindler
+dogcow@merit.edu
+
diff --git a/Todo b/Todo
index ab28e00..4752030 100644 (file)
--- a/Todo
+++ b/Todo
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ Would be nice to have
        reference to compiled regexp
        lexically scoped functions: my sub foo { ... }
        lvalue functions
-       Full 64 bit support
+       Full 64 bit support (i.e. "long long")
 
 Possible pragmas
        debugger
diff --git a/beos/nm.c b/beos/nm.c
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..4f53f74
--- /dev/null
+++ b/beos/nm.c
@@ -0,0 +1,53 @@
+/* nm.c - a feeble shared-lib library parser
+ * Copyright 1997, 1998 Tom Spindler
+ * This software is covered under perl's Artistic license.
+ */
+
+/* $Id: nm.c,v 1.1 1998/02/16 03:51:26 dogcow Exp $ */
+
+#include <be/kernel/image.h>
+#include <malloc.h>
+#include <string.h>
+#include <unistd.h>
+#include <stdio.h>
+#include <stdlib.h>
+
+main(int argc, char **argv) {
+char *path, *symname;
+image_id img;
+int32 n = 0;
+volatile int32 symnamelen, symtype;
+void *symloc;
+
+if (argc != 2) { printf("more args, bozo\n"); exit(1); }
+
+path = (void *) malloc((size_t) 2048);
+symname = (void *) malloc((size_t) 2048);
+
+if (!getcwd(path, 2048)) { printf("aiee!\n"); exit(1); }
+if (!strcat(path, "/"))  {printf("naah.\n"); exit (1); }
+/*printf("%s\n",path);*/
+
+if ('/' != argv[1][0]) {
+       if (!strcat(path, argv[1])) { printf("feh1\n"); exit(1); }
+} else {
+       if (!strcpy(path, argv[1])) { printf("gah!\n"); exit(1); }
+}
+/*printf("%s\n",path);*/
+
+img = load_add_on(path);
+if (B_ERROR == img) {printf("Couldn't load_add_on() %s.\n", path); exit(2); }
+
+symnamelen=2047;
+
+while (B_BAD_INDEX != get_nth_image_symbol(img, n++, symname, &symnamelen,
+                        &symtype, &symloc)) {
+       printf("%s |%s |GLOB %Lx | \n", symname,
+         ((B_SYMBOL_TYPE_ANY == symtype) || (B_SYMBOL_TYPE_TEXT == symtype)) ? "FUNC" : "VAR ", symloc);
+       symnamelen=2047;
+}
+printf("number of symbols: %d\n", n);
+if (B_ERROR == unload_add_on(img)) {printf("err while closing.\n"); exit(3); }
+free(path);
+return(0);
+}
index 6d46102..8a1ba82 100755 (executable)
--- a/cflags.SH
+++ b/cflags.SH
@@ -124,6 +124,7 @@ for file do
                optimize="$optdebug"
        fi
 
+    : Can we perhaps use $ansi2knr here
     echo "$cc -c -DPERL_CORE $ccflags $optimize $perltype $large $split"
     eval "$also "'"$cc -DPERL_CORE -c $ccflags $optimize $perltype $large $split"'
 
index 1d3a13d..5d4cffc 100644 (file)
@@ -918,42 +918,6 @@ sed <<!GROK!THIS! >config.h -e 's!^#undef\(.*/\)\*!/\*#define\1 \*!' -e 's!^#un-
  */
 #$i_niin I_NETINET_IN  /**/
 
-/* I_PWD:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
- *     include <pwd.h>.
- */
-/* PWQUOTA:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_quota.
- */
-/* PWAGE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_age.
- */
-/* PWCHANGE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_change.
- */
-/* PWCLASS:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_class.
- */
-/* PWEXPIRE:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_expire.
- */
-/* PWCOMMENT:
- *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
- *     contains pw_comment.
- */
-#$i_pwd I_PWD          /**/
-#$d_pwquota PWQUOTA    /**/
-#$d_pwage PWAGE        /**/
-#$d_pwchange PWCHANGE  /**/
-#$d_pwclass PWCLASS    /**/
-#$d_pwexpire PWEXPIRE  /**/
-#$d_pwcomment PWCOMMENT        /**/
-
 /* I_SFIO:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
  *     include <sfio.h>.
@@ -1739,6 +1703,47 @@ sed <<!GROK!THIS! >config.h -e 's!^#undef\(.*/\)\*!/\*#define\1 \*!' -e 's!^#un-
  */
 #$i_netdb I_NETDB              /**/
 
+/* I_PWD:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
+ *     include <pwd.h>.
+ */
+/* PWQUOTA:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_quota.
+ */
+/* PWAGE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_age.
+ */
+/* PWCHANGE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_change.
+ */
+/* PWCLASS:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_class.
+ */
+/* PWEXPIRE:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_expire.
+ */
+/* PWCOMMENT:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_comment.
+ */
+/* PWGECOS:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_gecos.
+ */
+#$i_pwd I_PWD          /**/
+#$d_pwquota PWQUOTA    /**/
+#$d_pwage PWAGE        /**/
+#$d_pwchange PWCHANGE  /**/
+#$d_pwclass PWCLASS    /**/
+#$d_pwexpire PWEXPIRE  /**/
+#$d_pwcomment PWCOMMENT        /**/
+#$d_pwgecos PWGECOS    /**/
+
 /* I_SYS_TYPES:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that it should
  *     include <sys/types.h>.
@@ -1758,6 +1763,37 @@ sed <<!GROK!THIS! >config.h -e 's!^#undef\(.*/\)\*!/\*#define\1 \*!' -e 's!^#un-
 #define PRIVLIB "$privlib"             /**/
 #define PRIVLIB_EXP "$privlibexp"              /**/
 
+/* SIG_NAME:
+ *     This symbol contains a list of signal names in order of
+ *     signal number. This is intended
+ *     to be used as a static array initialization, like this:
+ *             char *sig_name[] = { SIG_NAME };
+ *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and each signal
+ *     is surrounded by double quotes. There is no leading SIG in the signal
+ *     name, i.e. SIGQUIT is known as "QUIT".
+ *     Gaps in the signal numbers (up to NSIG) are filled in with NUMnn,
+ *     etc., where nn is the actual signal number (e.g. NUM37).
+ *     The signal number for sig_name[i] is stored in sig_num[i].
+ *     The last element is 0 to terminate the list with a NULL.  This
+ *     corresponds to the 0 at the end of the sig_num list.
+ */
+/* SIG_NUM:
+ *     This symbol contains a list of signal numbers, in the same order as the
+ *     SIG_NAME list. It is suitable for static array initialization, as in:
+ *             int sig_num[] = { SIG_NUM };
+ *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and the indices
+ *     within that list and the SIG_NAME list match, so it's easy to compute
+ *     the signal name from a number or vice versa at the price of a small
+ *     dynamic linear lookup. 
+ *     Duplicates are allowed, but are moved to the end of the list.
+ *     The signal number corresponding to sig_name[i] is sig_number[i].
+ *     if (i < NSIG) then sig_number[i] == i.  
+ *     The last element is 0, corresponding to the 0 at the end of
+ *     the sig_name list.
+ */
+#define SIG_NAME $sig_name_init                /**/
+#define SIG_NUM  $sig_num                      /**/
+
 /* SITEARCH:
  *     This symbol contains the name of the private library for this package.
  *     The library is private in the sense that it needn't be in anyone's
@@ -1898,37 +1934,6 @@ sed <<!GROK!THIS! >config.h -e 's!^#undef\(.*/\)\*!/\*#define\1 \*!' -e 's!^#un-
  */
 #define Select_fd_set_t        $selecttype     /**/
 
-/* SIG_NAME:
- *     This symbol contains a list of signal names in order of
- *     signal number. This is intended
- *     to be used as a static array initialization, like this:
- *             char *sig_name[] = { SIG_NAME };
- *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and each signal
- *     is surrounded by double quotes. There is no leading SIG in the signal
- *     name, i.e. SIGQUIT is known as "QUIT".
- *     Gaps in the signal numbers (up to NSIG) are filled in with NUMnn,
- *     etc., where nn is the actual signal number (e.g. NUM37).
- *     The signal number for sig_name[i] is stored in sig_num[i].
- *     The last element is 0 to terminate the list with a NULL.  This
- *     corresponds to the 0 at the end of the sig_num list.
- */
-/* SIG_NUM:
- *     This symbol contains a list of signal numbers, in the same order as the
- *     SIG_NAME list. It is suitable for static array initialization, as in:
- *             int sig_num[] = { SIG_NUM };
- *     The signals in the list are separated with commas, and the indices
- *     within that list and the SIG_NAME list match, so it's easy to compute
- *     the signal name from a number or vice versa at the price of a small
- *     dynamic linear lookup. 
- *     Duplicates are allowed, but are moved to the end of the list.
- *     The signal number corresponding to sig_name[i] is sig_number[i].
- *     if (i < NSIG) then sig_number[i] == i.  
- *     The last element is 0, corresponding to the 0 at the end of
- *     the sig_name list.
- */
-#define SIG_NAME $sig_name_init                /**/
-#define SIG_NUM  $sig_num                      /**/
-
 /* ARCHNAME:
  *     This symbol holds a string representing the architecture name.
  *     It may be used to construct an architecture-dependant pathname
@@ -1942,7 +1947,13 @@ sed <<!GROK!THIS! >config.h -e 's!^#undef\(.*/\)\*!/\*#define\1 \*!' -e 's!^#un-
  *     routine is available to yield the execution of the current
  *     thread.
  */
+/* HAS_SCHED_YIELD:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates that the sched_yield
+ *     routine is available to yield the execution of the current
+ *     thread.
+ */
 #$d_pthread_yield HAS_PTHREAD_YIELD    /**/
+#$d_sched_yield HAS_SCHED_YIELD        /**/
 
 /* PTHREADS_CREATED_JOINABLE:
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates that pthreads are created
index 5acf0ce..96a6885 100644 (file)
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ SSTAT='s=\.\(stat\.\)=_\1=g'
 STMP2='s=tmp2=tm2=g'
 SPACKLIST='s=\.\(packlist\)=_\1=g'
 
-sed -e $SCONFIG -e $SGREPTMP -e $SECHOTMP -e $SDDC -e $SOUT Configure |tr -d '\r' >s; mv -f s Configure
+sed -e $SCONFIG -e $SGREPTMP -e $SECHOTMP -e $SDDC -e $SOUT -e 's=\.\( \./\$file\)$=sh\1=g' Configure |tr -d '\r' >s; mv -f s Configure
 sed -e $SEXISTS -e $SLIST -e $SCONFIG Makefile.SH |tr -d '\r' >s; mv -f s Makefile.SH
 sed -e $SEXISTS -e $SPACKLIST lib/ExtUtils/Install.pm |tr -d '\r' >s; mv -f s lib/ExtUtils/Install.pm
 sed -e $SEXISTS -e $SPACKLIST lib/ExtUtils/MM_Unix.pm |tr -d '\r' >s; mv -f s lib/ExtUtils/MM_Unix.pm
diff --git a/doop.c b/doop.c
index 2de9376..11dc837 100644 (file)
--- a/doop.c
+++ b/doop.c
@@ -474,7 +474,7 @@ do_kv(ARGSproto)
        RETURN;
 
     if (gimme == G_SCALAR) {
-       I32 i;
+       IV i;
        dTARGET;
 
        if (op->op_flags & OPf_MOD) {   /* lvalue */
index 8831988..d71d1b3 100755 (executable)
@@ -29,10 +29,13 @@ xsfiles="`find . -name '*.xs' -print | sort`"
 ## IEXT char *     Isplitstr IINIT(" ");
 ## dEXTCONST char rcsid[] = "perl.c\nPatch level: ###\n";
 ## PP(pp_const)
+## PERLVARI(Grsfp, PerlIO *, Nullfp)
+## PERLVAR(cvcache,      HV *)
 
 set x  -d -l c \
        -r '/[dI]?EXT\(CONST\)?[ \t*]+\([a-zA-Z_0-9]+[ \t*]+\)*\([a-zA-Z_0-9]+\)[ \t]*\($\|;\|\[\|[ \t]I+NIT[ \t]*(\|\/\*\)/\3/' \
        -r '/IEXT[ \t][^\/]*[ \t*]I\([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_0-9]*\)[\[; \t]/\1/'  \
+       -r '/PERLVAR[a-zA-Z_0-9]*[ \t]*([ \t]*[GIT]?\([a-zA-Z_][a-zA-Z_0-9]*\)[ \t]*,/\1/'  \
        -r '/PP[ \t]*([ \t]*\([^ \t()]*\)[ \t]*)/\1/'
 
 shift
index fc7cf6d..4c877d9 100644 (file)
@@ -788,7 +788,7 @@ BEGIN {
     my $divide_op = infix_op("/");
     my $modulo_op = infix_op("%");
     my $lshift_op = infix_op("<<");
-    my $rshift_op = infix_op("<<");
+    my $rshift_op = infix_op(">>");
     my $ncmp_op = sub { "($_[0] > $_[1] ? 1 : ($_[0] < $_[1]) ? -1 : 0)" };
     my $scmp_op = prefix_op("sv_cmp");
     my $seq_op = prefix_op("sv_eq");
@@ -1438,7 +1438,7 @@ sub compile {
            last OPTION;
        } elsif ($opt eq "o") {
            $arg ||= shift @options;
-           open(STDOUT, ">$arg") or return "$arg: $!\n";
+           open(STDOUT, ">$arg") or return "open '>$arg': $!\n";
        } elsif ($opt eq "n") {
            $arg ||= shift @options;
            $module_name = $arg;
index a42edfb..323d63a 100644 (file)
@@ -37,7 +37,11 @@ main(int argc, char **argv, char **env)
     if (!do_undump) {
        my_perl = perl_alloc();
        if (!my_perl)
+#ifdef VMS
+           exit(vaxc$errno);
+#else
            exit(1);
+#endif
        perl_construct( my_perl );
     }
 
@@ -56,7 +60,11 @@ main(int argc, char **argv, char **env)
 #endif
        if (!fp) {
            perror(argv[1]);
+#ifdef VMS
+           exit(vaxc$errno);
+#else
            exit(1);
+#endif
        }
        argv++;
        argc--;
diff --git a/ext/POSIX/hints/bsdos.pl b/ext/POSIX/hints/bsdos.pl
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..62732ac
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# BSD platforms have extra fields in struct tm that need to be initialized.
+#  XXX A Configure test is needed.
+$self->{CCFLAGS} = $Config{ccflags} . ' -DSTRUCT_TM_HASZONE' ;
diff --git a/ext/POSIX/hints/freebsd.pl b/ext/POSIX/hints/freebsd.pl
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..62732ac
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# BSD platforms have extra fields in struct tm that need to be initialized.
+#  XXX A Configure test is needed.
+$self->{CCFLAGS} = $Config{ccflags} . ' -DSTRUCT_TM_HASZONE' ;
diff --git a/ext/POSIX/hints/netbsd.pl b/ext/POSIX/hints/netbsd.pl
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..62732ac
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# BSD platforms have extra fields in struct tm that need to be initialized.
+#  XXX A Configure test is needed.
+$self->{CCFLAGS} = $Config{ccflags} . ' -DSTRUCT_TM_HASZONE' ;
diff --git a/ext/POSIX/hints/openbsd.pl b/ext/POSIX/hints/openbsd.pl
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..62732ac
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# BSD platforms have extra fields in struct tm that need to be initialized.
+#  XXX A Configure test is needed.
+$self->{CCFLAGS} = $Config{ccflags} . ' -DSTRUCT_TM_HASZONE' ;
index cf7069c..c8bca0d 100644 (file)
@@ -32,7 +32,132 @@ Thread - multithreading
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-The C<Threads> module provides multithreading.
+The C<Thread> module provides multithreading support for perl.
+
+=head1 FUNCTIONS
+
+=over 8
+
+=item new \&start_sub
+
+=item new \&start_sub, LIST
+
+C<new> starts a new thread of execution in the referenced subroutine. The
+optional list is passed as parameters to the subroutine. Execution
+continues in both the subroutine and the code after the C<new> call.
+
+C<new Thread> returns a thread object representing the newly created
+thread.
+
+=item lock VARIABLE
+
+C<lock> places a lock on a variable until the lock goes out of scope.  If
+the variable is locked by another thread, the C<lock> call will block until
+it's available. C<lock> is recursive, so multiple calls to C<lock> are
+safe--the variable will remain locked until the outermost lock on the
+variable goes out of scope.
+
+Locks on variables only affect C<lock> calls--they do I<not> affect normal
+access to a variable. (Locks on subs are different, and covered in a bit)
+If you really, I<really> want locks to block access, then go ahead and tie
+them to something and manage this yourself. This is done on purpose. While
+managing access to variables is a good thing, perl doesn't force you out of
+its living room...
+
+If a container object, such as a hash or array, is locked, all the elements
+of that container are not locked. For example, if a thread does a C<lock
+@a>, any other thread doing a C<lock($a[12])> won't block.
+
+You may also C<lock> a sub, using C<lock &sub>. Any calls to that sub from
+another thread will block until the lock is released. This behaviour is not
+equvalent to C<use attrs qw(locked)> in the sub. C<use attrs qw(locked)>
+serializes access to a subroutine, but allows different threads
+non-simultaneous access. C<lock &sub>, on the other hand, will not allow
+I<any> other thread access for the duration of the lock.
+
+Finally, C<lock> will traverse up references exactly I<one> level.
+C<lock(\$a)> is equivalent to C<lock($a)>, while C<lock(\\$a)> is not.
+
+=item async BLOCK;
+
+C<async> creates a thread to execute the block immediately following
+it. This block is treated as an anonymous sub, and so must have a
+semi-colon after the closing brace. Like C<new Thread>, C<async> returns a
+thread object.
+
+=item Thread->self
+
+The C<Thread-E<gt>self> function returns a thread object that represents
+the thread making the C<Thread-E<gt>self> call.
+
+=item Thread->list
+
+C<Thread-E<gt>list> returns a list of thread objects for all running and
+finished but un-C<join>ed threads.
+
+=item cond_wait VARIABLE
+
+The C<cond_wait> function takes a B<locked> variable as a parameter,
+unlocks the variable, and blocks until another thread does a C<cond_signal>
+or C<cond_broadcast> for that same locked variable. The variable that
+C<cond_wait> blocked on is relocked after the C<cond_wait> is satisfied.
+If there are multiple threads C<cond_wait>ing on the same variable, all but
+one will reblock waiting to reaquire the lock on the variable. (So if
+you're only using C<cond_wait> for synchronization, give up the lock as
+soon as possible)
+
+=item cond_signal VARIABLE
+
+The C<cond_signal> function takes a locked variable as a parameter and
+unblocks one thread that's C<cond_wait>ing on that variable. If more than
+one thread is blocked in a C<cond_wait> on that variable, only one (and
+which one is indeterminate) will be unblocked.
+
+If there are no threads blocked in a C<cond_wait> on the variable, the
+signal is discarded.
+
+=item cond_broadcast VARIABLE
+
+The C<cond_broadcast> function works similarly to C<cond_wait>.
+C<cond_broadcast>, though, will unblock B<all> the threads that are blocked
+in a C<cond_wait> on the locked variable, rather than only one.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 METHODS
+
+=over 8
+
+=item join
+
+C<join> waits for a thread to end and returns any values the thread exited
+with. C<join> will block until the thread has ended, though it won't block
+if the thread has already terminated.
+
+If the thread being C<join>ed C<die>d, the error it died with will be
+returned at this time. If you don't want the thread performing the C<join>
+to die as well, you should either wrap the C<join> in an C<eval> or use the
+C<eval> thread method instead of C<join>.
+
+=item eval
+
+The C<eval> method wraps an C<eval> around a C<join>, and so waits for a
+thread to exit, passing along any values the thread might have returned.
+Errors, of course, get placed into C<$@>.
+
+=item tid
+
+The C<tid> method returns the tid of a thread. The tid is a monotonically
+increasing integer assigned when a thread is created. The main thread of a
+program will have a tid of zero, while subsequent threads will have tids
+assigned starting with one.
+
+=head1 LIMITATIONS
+
+The sequence number used to assign tids is a simple integer, and no
+checking is done to make sure the tid isn't currently in use. If a program
+creates more than 2^32 - 1 threads in a single run, threads may be assigned
+duplicate tids. This limitation may be lifted in a future version of Perl.
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
diff --git a/handy.h b/handy.h
index 233304b..e74a306 100644 (file)
--- a/handy.h
+++ b/handy.h
@@ -119,7 +119,7 @@ typedef unsigned short      U16;
 #define U16_MAX PERL_USHORT_MAX
 #define U16_MIN PERL_USHORT_MIN
 
-#if BYTEORDER > 0x4321
+#if LONGSIZE > 4
   typedef int          I32;
   typedef unsigned int U32;
 # define I32_MAX PERL_INT_MAX
@@ -263,6 +263,9 @@ typedef U16 line_t;
 */
 
 #ifndef lint
+
+#define NEWSV(x,len)   newSV(len)
+
 #ifndef LEAKTEST
 
 #define New(x,v,n,t)   (v = (t*)safemalloc((MEM_SIZE)((n)*sizeof(t))))
@@ -274,7 +277,6 @@ typedef U16 line_t;
 #define Renewc(v,n,t,c) \
          (v = (c*)saferealloc((Malloc_t)(v),(MEM_SIZE)((n)*sizeof(t))))
 #define Safefree(d)    safefree((Malloc_t)(d))
-#define NEWSV(x,len)   newSV(len)
 
 #else /* LEAKTEST */
 
@@ -287,7 +289,6 @@ typedef U16 line_t;
 #define Renewc(v,n,t,c) \
          (v = (c*)safexrealloc((Malloc_t)(v),(MEM_SIZE)((n)*sizeof(t))))
 #define Safefree(d)    safexfree((Malloc_t)(d))
-#define NEWSV(x,len)   newSV(x,len)
 
 #define MAXXCOUNT 1400
 #define MAXY_SIZE 80
diff --git a/hints/beos.sh b/hints/beos.sh
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..d8d4fd0
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,45 @@
+# BeOS hints file
+# $Id: beos.sh,v 1.1 1998/02/16 03:51:45 dogcow Exp $
+
+if [ ! -f ../beos/nm ]; then mwcc -w all -o ../beos/nm ../beos/nm.c; fi
+
+prefix="/boot/home/config"
+
+cpp="mwcc -e"
+
+libpth='/boot/beos/system/lib /boot/home/config/lib'
+usrinc='/boot/develop/headers/posix'
+locinc='/boot/develop/headers/ /boot/home/config/include'
+
+libc='/boot/beos/system/lib/libroot.so'
+libs=' '
+
+d_bcmp='define'
+d_bcopy='define'
+d_bzero='define'
+d_index='define'
+#d_htonl='define' # It exists, but much hackery would be required to support.
+# a bunch of extra includes would have to be added, and it's only used at
+# one place in the non-socket perl code.
+
+#these are all in libdll.a, which my version of nm doesn't know how to parse.
+#if I can get it to both do that, and scan multiple library files, perhaps
+#these can be gotten rid of.
+
+usemymalloc='n'
+# Hopefully, Be's malloc knows better than perl's.
+
+d_link='undef'
+dont_use_nlink='define'
+# no posix (aka hard) links for us!
+
+d_syserrlst='undef'
+# the array syserrlst[] is useless for the most part.
+# large negative numbers really kind of suck in arrays.
+
+#d_socket='undef'
+# Sockets really don't work with the current version of perl and the
+# current BeOS sockets; I suspect that a new module a la GSAR's WIN32 port
+# will be required.
+
+export PATH="$PATH:$PWD/beos"
index ae6a7ca..73bae63 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@
 archname='dos-djgpp'
 archobjs='djgpp.o'
 path_sep=\;
-startsh="#!sh"
+startsh="#! /bin/sh"
 
 cc='gcc'
 ld='gcc'
@@ -23,8 +23,6 @@ firstmakefile='GNUmakefile'
 exe_ext='.exe'
 
 randbits=31
-
-ln='cp'             # no REAL ln on dos
 lns='cp'
 
 usenm='true'
@@ -54,17 +52,6 @@ sitearch=$sitelib
 eagain='EAGAIN'
 rd_nodata='-1'
 
-: set up the translation script tr
-
-cat > UU/tr <<EOSC
-$startsh
-case "\$1\$2" in
-'[A-Z][a-z]') exec tr.exe '[:upper:]' '[:lower:]';;
-'[a-z][A-Z]') exec tr.exe '[:lower:]' '[:upper:]';;
-esac
-exec tr.exe "\$@"
-EOSC
-
 if [ "X$usethreads" = "X$define" ]; then
     set `echo X "$libswanted "| sed -e 's/ c / gthreads c /'`
     shift
index e4d0347..9d6e802 100644 (file)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ i_time='define'
 
 case "$cc" in
 *gcc*) ccflags="$ccflags -D_BSD_TYPES" ;;
-*) ccflags="$ccflags -D_POSIX_SOURCE -ansiposix -D_BSD_TYPES -Olimit 3000" ;;
+*) ccflags="$ccflags -D_POSIX_SOURCE -ansiposix -D_BSD_TYPES -Olimit 4000" ;;
 esac
 
 lddlflags="-shared"
index 9b54d2b..40d4291 100644 (file)
@@ -169,7 +169,7 @@ EOF
     # libswanted. If that fails to be true in future, then this can be
     # changed to add pthread to the very end of libswanted.
     set `echo X "$libswanted "| sed -e 's/ c / pthread /'`
-    ld="cc"
+    ld="${cc:-cc}"
     shift
     libswanted="$*"
     usemymalloc='n'
index 25b7062..2ae79f1 100644 (file)
@@ -13,6 +13,7 @@
 #      Martijn Koster <m.koster@webcrawler.com>
 #      Richard Yeh <rcyeh@cco.caltech.edu>
 #
+# Use of semctl() can crash system: disable -- Dominic Dunlop 980506
 # Raise stack size further; slight tweaks to accomodate MT 4.1
 #                      -- Dominic Dunlop <domo@computer.org> 980211
 # Raise perl's stack size -- Dominic Dunlop <domo@tcp.ip.lu> 970922
@@ -53,6 +54,9 @@ alignbytes=8
 # friends.  Use setjmp and friends instead.
 expr "$osvers" \< "4.0.3" > /dev/null && d_sigsetjmp='undef'
 
+# semctl(.., ..,  IPC_STATUS, ..) hangs system: say we don't have semctl()
+d_semctl='undef'
+
 # Get rid of some extra libs which it takes Configure a tediously
 # long time never to find on MachTen
 set `echo X "$libswanted "|sed -e 's/ net / /' -e 's/ socket / /' \
@@ -75,11 +79,14 @@ dont_use_nlink=define
 
 cat <<'EOM' >&4
 
-Tests
-       io/fs test 4  and
-       op/stat test 3
-may fail since MachTen may not return a useful nlinks field to stat
-on directories.
+During Configure, you may see the message
+
+*** WHOA THERE!!! ***
+    The recommended value for $d_semctl on this machine was "undef"!
+    Keep the recommended value? [y]
+
+Select the default answer: semctl() is buggy, and perl should be built
+without it.
 
 At the end of Configure, you will see a harmless message
 
@@ -88,5 +95,12 @@ Hmm...You had some extra variables I don't know about...I'll try to keep 'em.
         Propagating recommended variable nmopts
 Read the File::Find documentation for more information about dont_use_nlink
 
+Tests
+       io/fs test 4  and
+       op/stat test 3
+may fail since MachTen may not return a useful nlinks field to stat
+on directories.
+
 EOM
-expr "$osvers" \< "4.1" && test -r ./broken-db.msg && . ./broken-db.msg
+expr "$osvers" \< "4.1" >/dev/null && test -r ./broken-db.msg && \
+    . ./broken-db.msg
index b0736bf..71d5084 100644 (file)
@@ -72,3 +72,8 @@ case "$osvers" in
        d_setruid="$undef"
        ;;
 esac
+
+# vfork is ok on NetBSD.
+case "$usevfork" in
+'') usevfork=true ;;
+esac
index 047e4cf..744b131 100644 (file)
@@ -123,8 +123,10 @@ cat > UU/cc.cbu <<'EOSH'
 # If the C compiler is gcc:
 #   - check the fixed-includes
 #   - check as(1) and ld(1), they should not be GNU
+#      (GNU ad and ld 2.8.1 and later are reportedly ok, however.)
 # If the C compiler is not gcc:
 #   - check as(1) and ld(1), they should not be GNU
+#      (GNU ad and ld 2.8.1 and later are reportedly ok, however.)
 #
 # Watch out in case they have not set $cc.
 
@@ -236,9 +238,25 @@ if [ "X$usethreads" = "X$define" ]; then
     # as -lgdbm and such like. We assume here that -lc is present in
     # libswanted. If that fails to be true in future, then this can be
     # changed to add pthread to the very end of libswanted.
-    set `echo X "$libswanted "| sed -e 's/ c / pthread c /'`
+    # sched_yield is in -lposix4
+    set `echo X "$libswanted "| sed -e 's/ c / posix4 pthread c /'`
     shift
     libswanted="$*"
+
+    # On Solaris 2.6 x86 there is a bug with sigsetjmp() and siglongjmp()
+    # when linked with the threads library, such that whatever positive value
+    # you pass to siglongjmp(), sigsetjmp() returns 1.
+    # Thanks to Simon Parsons <S.Parsons@ftel.co.uk> for this report.
+    if test "`arch`" = i86pc -a "$osvers" = 2.6; then
+       d_sigaction=$undef
+       cat << 'EOM' >&2
+
+You will see a *** WHOA THERE!!! ***  message from Configure for
+d_sigaction.  Keep the recommended value.  See hints/solaris_2.sh
+for more information.
+
+EOM
+    fi
 fi
 
 # This is just a trick to include some useful notes.
index eb875e1..2939e4e 100644 (file)
@@ -1,15 +1,19 @@
 # svr4 hints, System V Release 4.x
-# Last modified 1995/01/28 by Tye McQueen, tye@metronet.com
+# Last modified 1996/10/25 by Tye McQueen, tye@metronet.com
+# Merged 1998/04/23 with perl5.004_04 distribution by 
+# Andy Dougherty <doughera@lafayette.edu>
+
 # Use Configure -Dcc=gcc to use gcc.
 case "$cc" in
 '') cc='/bin/cc'
     test -f $cc || cc='/usr/ccs/bin/cc'
     ;;
 esac
+
 # We include support for using libraries in /usr/ucblib, but the setting
-# of libswanted excludes some libraries found there.  You may want to
-# prevent "ucb" from being removed from libswanted and see if perl will
-# build on your system.
+# of libswanted excludes some libraries found there.  If you run into
+# problems, you may have to remove "ucb" from libswanted.  Just delete
+# the comment '#' from the sed command below.
 ldflags='-L/usr/ccs/lib -L/usr/ucblib'
 ccflags='-I/usr/include -I/usr/ucbinclude'
 # Don't use problematic libraries:
@@ -17,26 +21,57 @@ libswanted=`echo " $libswanted " | sed -e 's/ malloc / /'` # -e 's/ ucb / /'`
 # libmalloc.a - Probably using Perl's malloc() anyway.
 # libucb.a - Remove it if you have problems ld'ing.  We include it because
 #   it is needed for ODBM_File and NDBM_File extensions.
+
 if [ -r /usr/ucblib/libucb.a ]; then   # If using BSD-compat. library:
-    d_gconvert='undef' # Unusuable under UnixWare 1.1 [use gcvt() instead]
+    d_Gconvert='gcvt'  # Try gcvt() before gconvert().
     # Use the "native" counterparts, not the BSD emulation stuff:
     d_bcmp='undef' d_bcopy='undef' d_bzero='undef' d_safebcpy='undef'
     d_index='undef' d_killpg='undef' d_getprior='undef' d_setprior='undef'
-    d_setlinebuf='undef' d_setregid='undef' d_setreuid='undef'
+    d_setlinebuf='undef' 
+    # d_setregid='undef' d_setreuid='undef'  # ???
 fi
-d_suidsafe='define'    # "./Configure -d" can't figure this out easilly
-usevfork='false'
 
-# Configure may fail to find lstat() since it's a static/inline
-# function in <sys/stat.h> on Unisys U6000 SVR4, and possibly
-# other SVR4 derivatives.
-d_lstat=define
+# UnixWare has /usr/lib/libc.so.1, /usr/lib/libc.so.1.1, and
+# /usr/ccs/lib/libc.so.  Configure chooses libc.so.1.1 while it
+# appears that /usr/ccs/lib/libc.so contains more symbols:
+#
+# Try the following if you want to use nm-extraction.  We'll just
+# skip the nm-extraction phase, since searching for all the different
+# library versions will be hard to keep up-to-date.
+#
+# if [ "" = "$libc" -a -f /usr/ccs/lib/libc.so -a \
+#   -f /usr/lib/libc.so.1 -a -f /usr/lib/libc.so.1.1 ]; then
+#     if nm -h /usr/ccs/lib/libc.so | egrep '\<_?select$' >/dev/null; then
+#      if nm -h /usr/lib/libc.so.1 | egrep '\<_?select$'` >/dev/null ||
+#         nm -h /usr/lib/libc.so.1.1 | egrep '\<_?select$'` >/dev/null; then
+#          :
+#      else
+#          libc=/usr/ccs/lib/libc.so
+#      fi
+#     fi
+# fi
+#
+#  Don't bother with nm.  Just compile & link a small C program.
+case "$usenm" in
+'') usenm=false;;
+esac
+
+# Broken C-Shell tests (Thanks to Tye McQueen):
+# The OS-specific checks may be obsoleted by the this generic test.
+       sh_cnt=`sh -c 'echo /*' | wc -c`
+       csh_cnt=`csh -f -c 'glob /*' 2>/dev/null | wc -c`
+       csh_cnt=`expr 1 + $csh_cnt`
+if [ "$sh_cnt" -ne "$csh_cnt" ]; then
+    echo "You're csh has a broken 'glob', disabling..." >&2
+    d_csh='undef'
+fi
 
 # UnixWare has a broken csh.  The undocumented -X argument to uname is probably
 # a reasonable way of detecting UnixWare.  Also in 2.1.1 the fields in
 # FILE* got renamed! Plus 1.1 can't cast large floats to 32-bit ints.
-uw_ver=`uname -v`
-uw_isuw=`uname -X 2>&1 | grep Release`
+#      Leave leading tabs so Configure doesn't propagate these variables
+       uw_ver=`uname -v`
+       uw_isuw=`uname -X 2>&1 | grep Release`
 if [ "$uw_isuw" = "Release = 4.2" ]; then
    case $uw_ver in
    1.1)
@@ -47,33 +82,42 @@ fi
 if [ "$uw_isuw" = "Release = 4.2MP" ]; then
    case $uw_ver in
    2.1)
-      d_csh='undef'
-      ;;
+       d_csh='undef'
+       ;;
    2.1.*)
-      d_csh='undef'
-      stdio_cnt='((fp)->__cnt)'
-      d_stdio_cnt_lval='define'
-      stdio_ptr='((fp)->__ptr)'
-      d_stdio_ptr_lval='define'
-      ;;
+       d_csh='undef'
+       stdio_cnt='((fp)->__cnt)'
+       d_stdio_cnt_lval='define'
+       stdio_ptr='((fp)->__ptr)'
+       d_stdio_ptr_lval='define'
+       ;;
    esac
 fi
 
 # DDE SMES Supermax Enterprise Server
 case "`uname -sm`" in
 "UNIX_SV SMES")
-       if test "$cc" = '/bin/cc' -o "$gccversion" = ""
-       then
-               # for cc we need -K PIC (not -K pic)
-               cccdlflags="$cccdlflags -K PIC"
-       fi
-       # the *grent functions are in libgen.
-       libswanted="$libswanted gen"
-       # csh is broken (also) in SMES
-       d_csh='undef'
+    # the *grent functions are in libgen.
+    libswanted="$libswanted gen"
+    # csh is broken (also) in SMES
+    # This may already be detected by the generic test above.
+    d_csh='undef'
+    case "$cc" in
+    *gcc*) ;;
+    *) # for cc we need -K PIC (not -K pic)
+       cccdlflags="$cccdlflags -K PIC"
        ;;
+    esac
+    ;;
 esac
 
+# Configure may fail to find lstat() since it's a static/inline function
+# in <sys/stat.h> on Unisys U6000 SVR4, UnixWare 2.x, and possibly other
+# SVR4 derivatives.  (Though UnixWare has it in /usr/ccs/lib/libc.so.)
+d_lstat=define
+
+d_suidsafe='define'    # "./Configure -d" can't figure this out easilly
+
 cat <<'EOM' >&4
 
 If you wish to use dynamic linking, you must use 
index 7579eed..111cbb9 100644 (file)
@@ -1,10 +1,13 @@
 case `uname -r` in
 6.1*) shellflags="-m+65536" ;;
 esac
-optimize="-O1"
+case "$optimize" in
+'') optimize="-O1" ;;
+esac
 d_setregid='undef'
 d_setreuid='undef'
 case "$usemymalloc" in
-'') usemymalloc='y' ;;
+'') usemymalloc='y'
+    ccflags="$ccflags -DNO_RCHECK"
+    ;;
 esac
-
index 90784b5..f0b63cb 100644 (file)
@@ -1,3 +1,10 @@
-optimize="-O1"
+case "$optimize" in
+'') optimize="-O1" ;;
+esac
 d_setregid='undef'
 d_setreuid='undef'
+case "$usemymalloc" in
+'') usemymalloc='y'
+    ccflags="$ccflags -DNO_RCHECK"
+    ;;
+esac
diff --git a/hv.h b/hv.h
index 20af4ea..91b6fec 100644 (file)
--- a/hv.h
+++ b/hv.h
@@ -22,11 +22,12 @@ struct hek {
     char       hek_key[1];
 };
 
+/* This structure must match the beginning of struct xpvmg in sv.h. */
 struct xpvhv {
     char *     xhv_array;      /* pointer to malloced string */
     STRLEN     xhv_fill;       /* how full xhv_array currently is */
     STRLEN     xhv_max;        /* subscript of last element of xhv_array */
-    I32                xhv_keys;       /* how many elements in the array */
+    IV         xhv_keys;       /* how many elements in the array */
     double     xnv_nv;         /* numeric value, if any */
     MAGIC*     xmg_magic;      /* magic for scalar array */
     HV*                xmg_stash;      /* class package */
index fe168c9..a8bcd35 100755 (executable)
@@ -26,6 +26,9 @@ sub mkpath {
 $mainperldir = "/usr/bin";
 $exe_ext = $Config{exe_ext};
 
+# Allow ``make install PERLNAME=something_besides_perl'':
+$perl = defined($ENV{PERLNAME}) ? $ENV{PERLNAME} : 'perl';
+
 while (@ARGV) {
     $nonono = 1 if $ARGV[0] eq '-n';
     $versiononly = 1 if $ARGV[0] eq '-v';
@@ -35,8 +38,8 @@ while (@ARGV) {
 umask 022 unless $Is_VMS;
 
 @scripts = qw( utils/c2ph utils/h2ph utils/h2xs
-               utils/perlbug utils/perldoc utils/pl2pm utils/splain
-               x2p/s2p x2p/find2perl
+               utils/perlbug utils/perldoc utils/pl2pm utils/splain utils/perlcc
+               x2p/s2p x2p/find2perl 
                pod/pod2man pod/pod2html pod/pod2latex pod/pod2text);
 
 if ($Is_VMS) { @scripts = map { "$_.Com" } @scripts; }
@@ -50,6 +53,11 @@ if ($^O eq 'dos') {
     $archpms{config} = $archpms{filehand} = 1;
 }
 
+if ((-e "testcompile") && (defined($ENV{'COMPILE'})))
+{
+       push(@scripts, map("$_.exe", @scripts));
+}
+
 find(sub {
        if ("$File::Find::dir/$_" =~ m{^ext/[^/]+/(.*)\.pm$}) {
            (my $pm = $1) =~ s{^lib/}{};
@@ -112,9 +120,9 @@ if ($^O eq 'MSWin32') {
 
 # Install the DLL
 
-safe_unlink("$installbin/perl.$dlext");
-copy("perl.$dlext", "$installbin/perl.$dlext");
-chmod(0755, "$installbin/perl.$dlext");
+safe_unlink("$installbin/$perl.$dlext");
+copy("perl.$dlext", "$installbin/$perl.$dlext");
+chmod(0755, "$installbin/$perl.$dlext");
 }
 
 # This will be used to store the packlist
@@ -123,26 +131,26 @@ $packlist = ExtUtils::Packlist->new("$installarchlib/.packlist");
 # First we install the version-numbered executables.
 
 if ($Is_VMS) {
-    safe_unlink("$installbin/perl$exe_ext");
-    copy("perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/perl$exe_ext");
-    chmod(0755, "$installbin/perl$exe_ext");
-    safe_unlink("$installbin/perlshr$exe_ext");
-    copy("perlshr$exe_ext", "$installbin/perlshr$exe_ext");
-    chmod(0755, "$installbin/perlshr$exe_ext");
+    safe_unlink("$installbin/$perl$exe_ext");
+    copy("perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/$perl$exe_ext");
+    chmod(0755, "$installbin/$perl$exe_ext");
+    safe_unlink("$installbin/${perl}shr$exe_ext");
+    copy("perlshr$exe_ext", "$installbin/${perl}shr$exe_ext");
+    chmod(0755, "$installbin/${perl}shr$exe_ext");
 }
 elsif ($^O ne 'dos') {
-    safe_unlink("$installbin/perl$ver$exe_ext");
-    copy("perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/perl$ver$exe_ext");
-    chmod(0755, "$installbin/perl$ver$exe_ext");
+    safe_unlink("$installbin/$perl$ver$exe_ext");
+    copy("perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/$perl$ver$exe_ext");
+    chmod(0755, "$installbin/$perl$ver$exe_ext");
 } else {
-    safe_unlink("$installbin/perl.exe");
-    copy("perl.exe", "$installbin/perl.exe");
+    safe_unlink("$installbin/$perl.exe");
+    copy("perl.exe", "$installbin/$perl.exe");
 }
 
-safe_unlink("$installbin/sperl$ver$exe_ext");
+safe_unlink("$installbin/s$perl$ver$exe_ext");
 if ($d_dosuid) {
-    copy("suidperl$exe_ext", "$installbin/sperl$ver$exe_ext");
-    chmod(04711, "$installbin/sperl$ver$exe_ext");
+    copy("suidperl$exe_ext", "$installbin/s$perl$ver$exe_ext");
+    chmod(04711, "$installbin/s$perl$ver$exe_ext");
 }
 
 # Install library files.
@@ -194,9 +202,9 @@ foreach $file (@corefiles) {
 # Make links to ordinary names if installbin directory isn't current directory.
 
 if (! $versiononly && ! samepath($installbin, '.') && ($^O ne 'dos') && ! $Is_VMS) {
-    safe_unlink("$installbin/perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/suidperl$exe_ext");
-    link("$installbin/perl$ver$exe_ext", "$installbin/perl$exe_ext");
-    link("$installbin/sperl$ver$exe_ext", "$installbin/suidperl$exe_ext") 
+    safe_unlink("$installbin/$perl$exe_ext", "$installbin/suid$perl$exe_ext");
+    link("$installbin/$perl$ver$exe_ext", "$installbin/$perl$exe_ext");
+    link("$installbin/s$perl$ver$exe_ext", "$installbin/suid$perl$exe_ext") 
       if $d_dosuid;
 }
 
@@ -206,9 +214,9 @@ $mainperl_is_instperl = 0;
 
 if (!$versiononly && !$nonono && $^O ne 'MSWin32' && !$Is_VMS && -t STDIN && -t STDERR
        && -w $mainperldir && ! samepath($mainperldir, $installbin)) {
-    local($usrbinperl) = "$mainperldir/perl$exe_ext";
-    local($instperl)   = "$installbin/perl$exe_ext";
-    local($expinstperl)        = "$binexp/perl$exe_ext";
+    local($usrbinperl) = "$mainperldir/$perl$exe_ext";
+    local($instperl)   = "$installbin/$perl$exe_ext";
+    local($expinstperl)        = "$binexp/$perl$exe_ext";
 
     # First make sure $usrbinperl is not already the same as the perl we
     # just installed.
@@ -338,11 +346,11 @@ if (!$versiononly) {
        # to $mainperldir (like SunOS)
        next if samepath($_, $binexp);
        next if ($mainperl_is_instperl && samepath($_, $mainperldir));
-       push(@otherperls, "$_/perl$exe_ext")
-           if (-x "$_/perl$exe_ext" && ! -d "$_/perl$exe_ext");
+       push(@otherperls, "$_/$perl$exe_ext")
+           if (-x "$_/$perl$exe_ext" && ! -d "$_/$perl$exe_ext");
     }
     if (@otherperls) {
-       print STDERR "\nWarning: perl appears in your path in the following " .
+       print STDERR "\nWarning: $perl appears in your path in the following " .
            "locations beyond where\nwe just installed it:\n";
        for (@otherperls) {
            print STDERR "    ", $_, "\n";
index e09bc92..fe77dd0 100644 (file)
@@ -82,6 +82,30 @@ Results will be printed to STDOUT as TITLE followed by the times.
 TITLE defaults to "timethis COUNT" if none is provided. STYLE
 determines the format of the output, as described for timestr() below.
 
+The COUNT can be zero or negative: this means the I<minimum number of
+CPU seconds> to run.  A zero signifies the default of 3 seconds.  For
+example to run at least for 10 seconds:
+
+       timethis(-10, $code)
+
+or to run two pieces of code tests for at least 3 seconds:
+
+       timethese(0, { test1 => '...', test2 => '...'})
+
+CPU seconds is, in UNIX terms, the user time plus the system time of
+the process itself, as opposed to the real (wallclock) time and the
+time spent by the child processes.  Less than 0.1 seconds is not
+accepted (-0.01 as the count, for example, will cause a fatal runtime
+exception).
+
+Note that the CPU seconds is the B<minimum> time: CPU scheduling and
+other operating system factors may complicate the attempt so that a
+little bit more time is spent.  The benchmark output will, however,
+also tell the number of C<$code> runs/second, which should be a more
+interesting number than the actually spent seconds.
+
+Returns a Benchmark object.
+
 =item timethese ( COUNT, CODEHASHREF, [ STYLE ] )
 
 The CODEHASHREF is a reference to a hash containing names as keys
@@ -91,12 +115,14 @@ call
 
        timethis(COUNT, VALUE, KEY, STYLE)
 
+The Count can be zero or negative, see timethis().
+
 =item timediff ( T1, T2 )
 
 Returns the difference between two Benchmark times as a Benchmark
 object suitable for passing to timestr().
 
-=item timestr ( TIMEDIFF, [ STYLE, [ FORMAT ]] )
+=item timestr ( TIMEDIFF, [ STYLE, [ FORMAT ] ] )
 
 Returns a string that formats the times in the TIMEDIFF object in
 the requested STYLE. TIMEDIFF is expected to be a Benchmark object
@@ -205,6 +231,9 @@ March 28th, 1997; by Hugo van der Sanden: added support for code
 references and the already documented 'debug' method; revamped
 documentation.
 
+April 04-07th, 1997: by Jarkko Hietaniemi, added the run-for-some-time
+functionality.
+
 =cut
 
 use Carp;
@@ -237,7 +266,9 @@ sub disablecache  { $cache = 0; }
 
 # --- Functions to process the 'time' data type
 
-sub new { my @t = (time, times); print "new=@t\n" if $debug; bless \@t; }
+sub new { my @t = (time, times, @_ == 2 ? $_[1] : 0);
+         print "new=@t\n" if $debug;
+         bless \@t; }
 
 sub cpu_p { my($r,$pu,$ps,$cu,$cs) = @{$_[0]}; $pu+$ps         ; }
 sub cpu_c { my($r,$pu,$ps,$cu,$cs) = @{$_[0]};         $cu+$cs ; }
@@ -256,20 +287,21 @@ sub timediff {
 sub timestr {
     my($tr, $style, $f) = @_;
     my @t = @$tr;
-    warn "bad time value" unless @t==5;
-    my($r, $pu, $ps, $cu, $cs) = @t;
+    warn "bad time value (@t)" unless @t==6;
+    my($r, $pu, $ps, $cu, $cs, $n) = @t;
     my($pt, $ct, $t) = ($tr->cpu_p, $tr->cpu_c, $tr->cpu_a);
     $f = $defaultfmt unless defined $f;
     # format a time in the required style, other formats may be added here
     $style ||= $defaultstyle;
     $style = ($ct>0) ? 'all' : 'noc' if $style eq 'auto';
     my $s = "@t $style"; # default for unknown style
-    $s=sprintf("%2d secs (%$f usr %$f sys + %$f cusr %$f csys = %$f cpu)",
+    $s=sprintf("%2d wallclock secs (%$f usr %$f sys + %$f cusr %$f csys = %$f CPU secs)",
                            @t,$t) if $style eq 'all';
-    $s=sprintf("%2d secs (%$f usr %$f sys = %$f cpu)",
-                           $r,$pu,$ps,$pt) if $style eq 'noc';
-    $s=sprintf("%2d secs (%$f cusr %$f csys = %$f cpu)",
-                           $r,$cu,$cs,$ct) if $style eq 'nop';
+    $s=sprintf("%$f CPU secs (%$f usr + %$f sys)",
+                           $pt,$pu,$ps) if $style eq 'noc';
+    $s=sprintf("%$f CPU secs (%$f cusr %$f csys)",
+                           $ct,$cu,$cs) if $style eq 'nop';
+    $s .= sprintf(" @ %$f/s (n=$n)", $n / ( $pu + $ps )) if $n;
     $s;
 }
 
@@ -302,9 +334,9 @@ sub runloop {
     croak "runloop unable to compile '$c': $@\ncode: $subcode\n" if $@;
     print STDERR "runloop $n '$subcode'\n" if $debug;
 
-    $t0 = &new;
+    $t0 = Benchmark->new(0);
     &$subref;
-    $t1 = &new;
+    $t1 = Benchmark->new($n);
     $td = &timediff($t1, $t0);
 
     timedebug("runloop:",$td);
@@ -336,16 +368,98 @@ sub timeit {
     $wd;
 }
 
+
+my $default_for = 3;
+my $min_for     = 0.1;
+
+sub runfor {
+    my ($code, $tmax) = @_;
+
+    if ( not defined $tmax or $tmax == 0 ) {
+       $tmax = $default_for;
+    } elsif ( $tmax < 0 ) {
+       $tmax = -$tmax;
+    }
+
+    die "runfor(..., $tmax): timelimit cannot be less than $min_for.\n"
+       if $tmax < $min_for;
+
+    my ($n, $td, $tc, $ntot, $rtot, $utot, $stot, $cutot, $cstot );
+
+    # First find the minimum $n that gives a non-zero timing.
+    
+    my $nmin;
+
+    for ($n = 1, $tc = 0; $tc <= 0; $n *= 2 ) {
+       $td = timeit($n, $code);
+       $tc = $td->[1] + $td->[2];
+    }
+
+    $nmin = $n;
+
+    my $ttot = 0;
+    my $tpra = 0.05 * $tmax; # Target/time practice.
+
+    # Double $n until we have think we have practiced enough.
+    for ( $n = 1; $ttot < $tpra; $n *= 2 ) {
+       $td = timeit($n, $code);
+       $tc = $td->cpu_p;
+       $ntot += $n;
+       $rtot += $td->[0];
+       $utot += $td->[1];
+       $stot += $td->[2];
+       $ttot = $utot + $stot;
+       $cutot += $td->[3];
+       $cstot += $td->[4];
+    }
+
+    my $r;
+
+    # Then iterate towards the $tmax.
+    while ( $ttot < $tmax ) {
+       $r = $tmax / $ttot - 1; # Linear approximation.
+       $n = int( $r * $n );
+       $n = $nmin if $n < $nmin;
+       $td = timeit($n, $code);
+       $ntot += $n;
+       $rtot += $td->[0];
+       $utot += $td->[1];
+       $stot += $td->[2];
+       $ttot = $utot + $stot;
+       $cutot += $td->[3];
+       $cstot += $td->[4];
+    }
+
+    return bless [ $rtot, $utot, $stot, $cutot, $cstot, $ntot ];
+}
+
 # --- Functions implementing high-level time-then-print utilities
 
+sub n_to_for {
+    my $n = shift;
+    return $n == 0 ? $default_for : $n < 0 ? -$n : undef;
+}
+
 sub timethis{
     my($n, $code, $title, $style) = @_;
-    my $t = timeit($n, $code);
+    my($t, $for, $forn);
+
+    if ( $n > 0 ) {
+       croak "non-integer loopcount $n, stopped" if int($n)<$n;
+       $t = timeit($n, $code);
+       $title = "timethis $n" unless defined $title;
+    } else {
+       $fort  = n_to_for( $n );
+       $t     = runfor($code, $fort);
+       $title = "timethis for $fort" unless defined $title;
+       $forn  = $t->[-1];
+    }
     local $| = 1;
-    $title = "timethis $n" unless defined $title;
     $style = "" unless defined $style;
     printf("%10s: ", $title);
-    print timestr($t, $style),"\n";
+    print timestr($t, $style, $defaultfmt),"\n";
+
+    $n = $forn if defined $forn;
 
     # A conservative warning to spot very silly tests.
     # Don't assume that your benchmark is ok simply because
@@ -363,7 +477,19 @@ sub timethese{
                unless ref $alt eq HASH;
     my @names = sort keys %$alt;
     $style = "" unless defined $style;
-    print "Benchmark: timing $n iterations of ",join(', ',@names),"...\n";
+    print "Benchmark: ";
+    if ( $n > 0 ) {
+       croak "non-integer loopcount $n, stopped" if int($n)<$n;
+       print "timing $n iterations of";
+    } else {
+       print "running";
+    }
+    print " ", join(', ',@names);
+    unless ( $n > 0 ) {
+       my $for = n_to_for( $n );
+       print ", each for at least $for CPU seconds";
+    }
+    print "...\n";
 
     # we could save the results in an array and produce a summary here
     # sum, min, max, avg etc etc
index 992d178..6a5c184 100644 (file)
@@ -81,10 +81,13 @@ sub install {
        #there are any files in arch. So we depend on having ./blib/arch
        #hardcoded here.
        my $targetroot = $hash{$source};
-       if ($source eq "./blib/lib" and
-           exists $hash{"./blib/arch"} and
-           directory_not_empty("./blib/arch")) {
-           $targetroot = $hash{"./blib/arch"};
+       if ($source eq "blib/lib" and
+           exists $hash{"blib/arch"} and
+           directory_not_empty("blib/arch")) {
+           $targetroot = $hash{"blib/arch"};
+            print "Files found in blib/arch --> Installing files in " 
+               . "blib/lib into architecture dependend library tree!\n"
+               ; #if $verbose>1;
        }
        chdir($source) or next;
        find(sub {
index 7661901..5a603ca 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,8 @@ $self->{BASEEXT}.def: Makefile.PL
      '", "DLBASE" => "',$self->{DLBASE},
      '", "DL_FUNCS" => ',neatvalue($funcs),
      ', "IMPORTS" => ',neatvalue($imports),
-     ', "DL_VARS" => ', neatvalue($vars), ');\'
+     ', "VERSION" => "',$self->{VERSION},
+     '", "DL_VARS" => ', neatvalue($vars), ');\'
 ');
     }
     join('',@m);
index f2cf735..4f861df 100644 (file)
@@ -1268,7 +1268,7 @@ sub init_dirscan {        # --- File and Directory Lists (.xs .pm .pod etc)
     my($self) = @_;
     my($name, %dir, %xs, %c, %h, %ignore, %pl_files, %manifypods);
     local(%pm); #the sub in find() has to see this hash
-    $ignore{'test.pl'} = 1;
+    @ignore{qw(Makefile.PL test.pl)} = (1,1);
     $ignore{'makefile.pl'} = 1 if $Is_VMS;
     foreach $name ($self->lsdir($self->curdir)){
        next if $name =~ /\#/;
@@ -1286,13 +1286,16 @@ sub init_dirscan {      # --- File and Directory Lists (.xs .pm .pod etc)
                unless $name =~ m/perlmain\.c/; # See MAP_TARGET
        } elsif ($name =~ /\.h$/i){
            $h{$name} = 1;
+       } elsif ($name =~ /\.PL$/) {
+           ($pl_files{$name} = $name) =~ s/\.PL$// ;
+       } elsif ($Is_VMS && $name =~ /\.pl$/) {  # case-insensitive filesystem
+           local($/); open(PL,$name); my $txt = <PL>; close PL;
+           if ($txt =~ /Extracting \S+ \(with variable substitutions/) {
+               ($pl_files{$name} = $name) =~ s/\.pl$// ;
+           }
+           else { $pm{$name} = $self->catfile('$(INST_LIBDIR)',$name); }
        } elsif ($name =~ /\.(p[ml]|pod)$/){
            $pm{$name} = $self->catfile('$(INST_LIBDIR)',$name);
-       } elsif ($name =~ /\.PL$/ && $name ne "Makefile.PL") {
-           ($pl_files{$name} = $name) =~ s/\.PL$// ;
-       } elsif ($Is_VMS && $name =~ /\.pl$/ && $name ne 'makefile.pl' &&
-                $name ne 'test.pl') {  # case-insensitive filesystem
-           ($pl_files{$name} = $name) =~ s/\.pl$// ;
        }
     }
 
@@ -1496,7 +1499,7 @@ sub init_main {
         $modfname = &DynaLoader::mod2fname(\@modparts);
     }
 
-    ($self->{PARENT_NAME}, $self->{BASEEXT}) = $self->{NAME} =~ m!([\w:]+::)?(\w+)$! ;
+    ($self->{PARENT_NAME}, $self->{BASEEXT}) = $self->{NAME} =~ m!(?:([\w:]+)::)?(\w+)$! ;
 
     if (defined &DynaLoader::mod2fname) {
        # As of 5.001m, dl_os2 appends '_'
index 29bfaf2..a1eae37 100644 (file)
@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ use VMS::Filespec;
 use File::Basename;
 
 use vars qw($Revision);
-$Revision = '5.3901 (6-Mar-1997)';
+$Revision = '5.42 (31-Mar-1997)';
 
 unshift @MM::ISA, 'ExtUtils::MM_VMS';
 
@@ -90,8 +90,10 @@ are all macro, so that we can tell how long the expansion is, and avoid
 overrunning DCL's command buffer when MM[KS] is running.
 
 If optional second argument has a TRUE value, then the return string is
-a VMS-syntax directory specification, otherwise it is a VMS-syntax file
-specification.
+a VMS-syntax directory specification, if it is FALSE, the return string
+is a VMS-syntax file specification, and if it is not specified, fixpath()
+checks to see whether it matches the name of a directory in the current
+default directory, and returns a directory or file specification accordingly.
 
 =cut
 
@@ -122,8 +124,10 @@ sub fixpath {
         $fixedpath = $path;
         $fixedpath = vmspath($fixedpath) if $force_path;
     }
-    # Convert names without directory or type to paths
-    if (!$force_path and $fixedpath !~ /[:>(.\]]/) { $fixedpath = vmspath($fixedpath); }
+    # No hints, so we try to guess
+    if (!defined($force_path) and $fixedpath !~ /[:>(.\]]/) {
+        $fixedpath = vmspath($fixedpath) if -d $fixedpath;
+    }
     # Trim off root dirname if it's had other dirs inserted in front of it.
     $fixedpath =~ s/\.000000([\]>])/$1/;
     print "fixpath($path) = |$fixedpath|\n" if $Verbose >= 3;
@@ -436,7 +440,7 @@ sub find_perl {
        }
        foreach $name (@snames){
            if ($name !~ m![/:>\]]!) { push(@cand,$self->catfile($dir,$name)); }
-           else                     { push(@cand,$self->fixpath($name));      }
+           else                     { push(@cand,$self->fixpath($name,0));    }
        }
     }
     foreach $name (@cand) {
@@ -639,9 +643,9 @@ sub constants {
 
     if ($self->{OBJECT} =~ /\s/) {
        $self->{OBJECT} =~ s/(\\)?\n+\s+/ /g;
-       $self->{OBJECT} = $self->wraplist(map($self->fixpath($_),split(/,?\s+/,$self->{OBJECT})));
+       $self->{OBJECT} = $self->wraplist(map($self->fixpath($_,0),split(/,?\s+/,$self->{OBJECT})));
     }
-    $self->{LDFROM} = $self->wraplist(map($self->fixpath($_),split(/,?\s+/,$self->{LDFROM})));
+    $self->{LDFROM} = $self->wraplist(map($self->fixpath($_,0),split(/,?\s+/,$self->{LDFROM})));
 
 
     # Fix up directory specs
@@ -664,7 +668,7 @@ sub constants {
     # Fix up file specs
     foreach $macro ( qw[LIBPERL_A FIRST_MAKEFILE MAKE_APERL_FILE MYEXTLIB] ) {
        next unless defined $self->{$macro};
-       $self->{$macro} = $self->fixpath($self->{$macro});
+       $self->{$macro} = $self->fixpath($self->{$macro},0);
     }
 
     foreach $macro (qw/
@@ -702,7 +706,7 @@ MM_VMS_REVISION = $ExtUtils::MM_VMS::Revision
              FULLEXT VERSION_FROM OBJECT LDFROM
              / ) {
        next unless defined $self->{$tmp};
-       push @m, "$tmp = ",$self->fixpath($self->{$tmp}),"\n";
+       push @m, "$tmp = ",$self->fixpath($self->{$tmp},0),"\n";
     }
 
     for $tmp (qw/
@@ -716,7 +720,7 @@ MM_VMS_REVISION = $ExtUtils::MM_VMS::Revision
        next unless defined $self->{$tmp};
        my(%tmp,$key);
        for $key (keys %{$self->{$tmp}}) {
-           $tmp{$self->fixpath($key)} = $self->fixpath($self->{$tmp}{$key});
+           $tmp{$self->fixpath($key,0)} = $self->fixpath($self->{$tmp}{$key},0);
        }
        $self->{$tmp} = \%tmp;
     }
@@ -725,7 +729,7 @@ MM_VMS_REVISION = $ExtUtils::MM_VMS::Revision
        next unless defined $self->{$tmp};
        my(@tmp,$val);
        for $val (@{$self->{$tmp}}) {
-           push(@tmp,$self->fixpath($val));
+           push(@tmp,$self->fixpath($val,0));
        }
        $self->{$tmp} = \@tmp;
     }
@@ -1011,7 +1015,7 @@ sub tool_xsubpp {
                        warn "Typemap $typemap not found.\n";
                }
                else{
-                       push(@tmdeps, $self->fixpath($typemap));
+                       push(@tmdeps, $self->fixpath($typemap,0));
                }
        }
     }
@@ -1464,31 +1468,6 @@ $(INST_STATIC) : $(OBJECT) $(MYEXTLIB)
 }
 
 
-# sub installpm_x { # called by installpm perl file
-#     my($self, $dist, $inst, $splitlib) = @_;
-#     if ($inst =~ m!#!) {
-#      warn "Warning: MM[SK] would have problems processing this file: $inst, SKIPPED\n";
-#      return '';
-#     }
-#     $inst = $self->fixpath($inst);
-#     $dist = $self->fixpath($dist);
-#     my($instdir) = $inst =~ /([^\)]+\))[^\)]*$/ ? $1 : dirname($inst);
-#     my(@m);
-# 
-#     push(@m, "
-# $inst : $dist \$(MAKEFILE) ${instdir}.exists \$(INST_ARCHAUTODIR).exists
-# ",'  $(NOECHO) $(RM_F) $(MMS$TARGET)
-#      $(NOECHO) $(CP) ',"$dist $inst",'
-#      $(CHMOD) 644 $(MMS$TARGET)
-# ');
-#     push(@m, '       $(AUTOSPLITFILE) $(MMS$TARGET) ',
-#               $self->catdir($splitlib,'auto')."\n\n")
-#         if ($splitlib and $inst =~ /\.pm$/);
-#     push(@m,$self->dir_target($instdir));
-# 
-#     join('',@m);
-# }
-
 =item manifypods (override)
 
 Use VMS-style quoting on command line, and VMS logical name
@@ -1674,7 +1653,7 @@ clean ::
            if (($key) = $word =~ m#^\$\((.*)\)$# and ref $self->{$key} eq 'ARRAY') {
                push(@otherfiles, @{$self->{$key}});
            }
-           else { push(@otherfiles, $attribs{FILES}); }
+           else { push(@otherfiles, $word); }
        }
     }
     push(@otherfiles, qw[ blib $(MAKE_APERL_FILE) extralibs.ld perlmain.c pm_to_blib.ts ]);
@@ -1748,7 +1727,7 @@ realclean :: clean
            if (($key) = $word =~ m#^\$\((.*)\)$# and ref $self->{$key} eq 'ARRAY') {
                push(@allfiles, @{$self->{$key}});
            }
-           else { push(@allfiles, $attribs{FILES}); }
+           else { push(@allfiles, $word); }
        }
        $line = '';
        # Occasionally files are repeated several times from different sources
@@ -2037,7 +2016,7 @@ $(PERL_ARCHLIB)Config.pm : $(PERL_VMS)config.vms $(PERL_VMS)genconfig.pl
        Set Default $(PERL_SRC)
        $(MMS)],$mmsquals,);
        if ($self->{PERL_ARCHLIB} =~ m|\[-| && $self->{PERL_SRC} =~ m|(\[-+)|) {
-           my($prefix,$target) = ($1,$self->fixpath('$(PERL_ARCHLIB)Config.pm'));
+           my($prefix,$target) = ($1,$self->fixpath('$(PERL_ARCHLIB)Config.pm',0));
            $target =~ s/\Q$prefix/[/;
            push(@m," $target");
        }
@@ -2047,7 +2026,7 @@ $(PERL_ARCHLIB)Config.pm : $(PERL_VMS)config.vms $(PERL_VMS)genconfig.pl
 ]);
     }
 
-    push(@m, join(" ", map($self->fixpath($_),values %{$self->{XS}}))." : \$(XSUBPPDEPS)\n")
+    push(@m, join(" ", map($self->fixpath($_,0),values %{$self->{XS}}))." : \$(XSUBPPDEPS)\n")
       if %{$self->{XS}};
 
     join('',@m);
@@ -2330,8 +2309,8 @@ $(MAP_TARGET) :: $(MAKE_APERL_FILE)
 
     push @m, '
 # Fill in the target you want to produce if it\'s not perl
-MAP_TARGET    = ',$self->fixpath($target),'
-MAP_SHRTARGET = ',$self->fixpath($shrtarget),"
+MAP_TARGET    = ',$self->fixpath($target,0),'
+MAP_SHRTARGET = ',$self->fixpath($shrtarget,0),"
 MAP_LINKCMD   = $linkcmd
 MAP_PERLINC   = ", $perlinc ? map('"$_" ',@{$perlinc}) : '','
 # We use the linker options files created with each extension, rather than
@@ -2339,7 +2318,7 @@ MAP_PERLINC   = ", $perlinc ? map('"$_" ',@{$perlinc}) : '','
 MAP_STATIC    = ',@staticopts ? join(' ', @staticopts) : '','
 MAP_OPTS    = ',@staticopts ? ','.join(',', map($_.'/Option', @staticopts)) : '',"
 MAP_EXTRA     = $extralist
-MAP_LIBPERL = ",$self->fixpath($libperl),'
+MAP_LIBPERL = ",$self->fixpath($libperl,0),'
 ';
 
 
index 4ec091d..48a4b15 100644 (file)
@@ -7,7 +7,7 @@ use Exporter;
 use vars qw( @ISA @EXPORT $VERSION );
 @ISA = 'Exporter';
 @EXPORT = '&Mksymlists';
-$VERSION = substr q$Revision: 1.16 $, 10;
+$VERSION = substr q$Revision: 1.17 $, 10;
 
 sub Mksymlists {
     my(%spec) = @_;
@@ -69,6 +69,8 @@ sub _write_aix {
 
 sub _write_os2 {
     my($data) = @_;
+    require Config;
+    my $threaded = ($Config::Config{archname} =~ /-thread/ ? " threaded" : "");
 
     if (not $data->{DLBASE}) {
         ($data->{DLBASE} = $data->{NAME}) =~ s/.*:://;
@@ -79,6 +81,7 @@ sub _write_os2 {
     open(DEF,">$data->{FILE}.def")
         or croak("Can't create $data->{FILE}.def: $!\n");
     print DEF "LIBRARY '$data->{DLBASE}' INITINSTANCE TERMINSTANCE\n";
+    print DEF "DESCRIPTION 'Perl (v$]$threaded) module $data->{NAME} v$data->{VERSION}'\n";
     print DEF "CODE LOADONCALL\n";
     print DEF "DATA LOADONCALL NONSHARED MULTIPLE\n";
     print DEF "EXPORTS\n  ";
index 5b5b495..fe7e12f 100644 (file)
@@ -955,6 +955,12 @@ identifier is $opt_ .
 The linkage specifier can be a reference to a scalar, a reference to
 an array, a reference to a hash or a reference to a subroutine.
 
+Note that, if your code is running under the recommended C<use strict
+'vars'> pragma, it may be helpful to declare these package variables
+via C<use vars> perhaps something like this:
+
+    use vars qw/ $opt_size @opt_sizes $opt_bar /;
+
 If a REF SCALAR is supplied, the new value is stored in the referenced
 variable. If the option occurs more than once, the previous value is
 overwritten. 
index 2788293..18b5739 100644 (file)
@@ -27,6 +27,12 @@ switch name) to the value of the argument, or 1 if no argument.  Switches
 which take an argument don't care whether there is a space between the
 switch and the argument.
 
+Note that, if your code is running under the recommended C<use strict
+'vars'> pragma, it may be helpful to declare these package variables
+via C<use vars> perhaps something like this:
+
+    use vars qw/ $opt_foo $opt_bar /;
+
 For those of you who don't like additional variables being created, getopt()
 and getopts() will also accept a hash reference as an optional second argument. 
 Hash keys will be x (where x is the switch name) with key values the value of
index 6b0b5e7..2183c8d 100644 (file)
@@ -193,7 +193,7 @@ sub findConsole {
        $console = "sys\$command";
     }
 
-    if ($^O eq 'amigaos') {
+    if (($^O eq 'amigaos') || ($^O eq 'beos')) {
        $console = undef;
     }
     elsif ($^O eq 'os2') {
index b10d104..5f198c2 100644 (file)
@@ -2,8 +2,9 @@ use strict;
 package Test;
 use Test::Harness 1.1601 ();
 use Carp;
-use vars qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORT $ntest %todo %history $TestLevel);
-$VERSION = '0.08';
+use vars (qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORT $ntest $TestLevel), #public-ish
+         qw($ONFAIL %todo %history $planned @FAILDETAIL)); #private-ish
+$VERSION = '1.04';
 require Exporter;
 @ISA=('Exporter');
 @EXPORT= qw(&plan &ok &skip $ntest);
@@ -19,12 +20,17 @@ $ENV{REGRESSION_TEST} = $0;
 
 sub plan {
     croak "Test::plan(%args): odd number of arguments" if @_ & 1;
+    croak "Test::plan(): should not be called more than once" if $planned;
     my $max=0;
     for (my $x=0; $x < @_; $x+=2) {
        my ($k,$v) = @_[$x,$x+1];
        if ($k =~ /^test(s)?$/) { $max = $v; }
        elsif ($k eq 'todo' or 
               $k eq 'failok') { for (@$v) { $todo{$_}=1; }; }
+       elsif ($k eq 'onfail') { 
+           ref $v eq 'CODE' or croak "Test::plan(onfail => $v): must be CODE";
+           $ONFAIL = $v; 
+       }
        else { carp "Test::plan(): skipping unrecognized directive '$k'" }
     }
     my @todo = sort { $a <=> $b } keys %todo;
@@ -33,6 +39,7 @@ sub plan {
     } else {
        print "1..$max\n";
     }
+    ++$planned;
 }
 
 sub to_value {
@@ -40,79 +47,89 @@ sub to_value {
     (ref $v or '') eq 'CODE' ? $v->() : $v;
 }
 
-# prototypes are not used for maximum flexibility
-
-# STDERR is NOT used for diagnostic output that should be fixed before
-# the module is released.
+# STDERR is NOT used for diagnostic output which should have been
+# fixed before release.  Is this appropriate?
 
-sub ok {
+sub ok ($;$$) {
+    croak "ok: plan before you test!" if !$planned;
     my ($pkg,$file,$line) = caller($TestLevel);
     my $repetition = ++$history{"$file:$line"};
     my $context = ("$file at line $line".
-                  ($repetition > 1 ? " (\#$repetition)" : ''));
+                  ($repetition > 1 ? " fail \#$repetition" : ''));
     my $ok=0;
-
+    my $result = to_value(shift);
+    my ($expected,$diag);
     if (@_ == 0) {
-       print "not ok $ntest\n";
-       print "# test $context: DOESN'T TEST ANYTHING!\n";
+       $ok = $result;
     } else {
-       my $result = to_value(shift);
-       my ($expected,$diag);
-       if (@_ == 0) {
-           $ok = $result;
+       $expected = to_value(shift);
+       # until regex can be manipulated like objects...
+       my ($regex,$ignore);
+       if (($regex) = ($expected =~ m,^ / (.+) / $,sx) or
+           ($ignore, $regex) = ($expected =~ m,^ m([^\w\s]) (.+) \1 $,sx)) {
+           $ok = $result =~ /$regex/;
        } else {
-           $expected = to_value(shift);
            $ok = $result eq $expected;
        }
-       if ($todo{$ntest}) {
-           if ($ok) { 
-               print "ok $ntest # Wow!\n";
+    }
+    if ($todo{$ntest}) {
+       if ($ok) { 
+           print "ok $ntest # Wow! ($context)\n";
+       } else {
+           $diag = to_value(shift) if @_;
+           if (!$diag) {
+               print "not ok $ntest # (failure expected in $context)\n";
            } else {
-               $diag = to_value(shift) if @_;
+               print "not ok $ntest # (failure expected: $diag)\n";
+           }
+       }
+    } else {
+       print "not " if !$ok;
+       print "ok $ntest\n";
+       
+       if (!$ok) {
+           my $detail = { 'repetition' => $repetition, 'package' => $pkg,
+                          'result' => $result };
+           $$detail{expected} = $expected if defined $expected;
+           $diag = $$detail{diagnostic} = to_value(shift) if @_;
+           if (!defined $expected) {
                if (!$diag) {
-                   print "not ok $ntest # (failure expected)\n";
+                   print STDERR "# Failed test $ntest in $context\n";
                } else {
-                   print "not ok $ntest # (failure expected: $diag)\n";
+                   print STDERR "# Failed test $ntest in $context: $diag\n";
                }
-           }
-       } else {
-           print "not " if !$ok;
-           print "ok $ntest\n";
-
-           if (!$ok) {
-               $diag = to_value(shift) if @_;
-               if (!defined $expected) {
-                   if (!$diag) {
-                       print STDERR "# Failed $context\n";
-                   } else {
-                       print STDERR "# Failed $context: $diag\n";
-                   }
+           } else {
+               my $prefix = "Test $ntest";
+               print STDERR "# $prefix got: '$result' ($context)\n";
+               $prefix = ' ' x (length($prefix) - 5);
+               if (!$diag) {
+                   print STDERR "# $prefix Expected: '$expected'\n";
                } else {
-                   print STDERR "#      Got: '$result' ($context)\n";
-                   if (!$diag) {
-                       print STDERR "# Expected: '$expected'\n";
-                   } else {
-                       print STDERR "# Expected: '$expected' ($diag)\n";
-                   }
+                   print STDERR "# $prefix Expected: '$expected' ($diag)\n";
                }
            }
+           push @FAILDETAIL, $detail;
        }
     }
     ++ $ntest;
     $ok;
 }
 
-sub skip {
+sub skip ($$;$$) {
     if (to_value(shift)) {
        print "ok $ntest # skip\n";
        ++ $ntest;
        1;
     } else {
-       local($TestLevel) += 1;  #ignore this stack frame
-       ok(@_);
+       local($TestLevel) = $TestLevel+1;  #ignore this stack frame
+       &ok;
     }
 }
 
+END {
+    $ONFAIL->(\@FAILDETAIL) if @FAILDETAIL && $ONFAIL;
+}
+
 1;
 __END__
 
@@ -124,7 +141,7 @@ __END__
 
   use strict;
   use Test;
-  BEGIN { plan tests => 12, todo => [3,4] }
+  BEGIN { plan tests => 13, todo => [3,4] }
 
   ok(0); # failure
   ok(1); # success
@@ -141,7 +158,8 @@ __END__
   ok(0, int(rand(2));  # (just kidding! :-)
 
   my @list = (0,0);
-  ok(scalar(@list), 3, "\@list=".join(',',@list));  #extra diagnostics
+  ok @list, 3, "\@list=".join(',',@list);      #extra diagnostics
+  ok 'segmentation fault', '/(?i)success/';    #regex match
 
   skip($feature_is_missing, ...);    #do platform specific test
 
@@ -175,10 +193,32 @@ test would be on the new feature list, not the TODO list).
 
 Packages should NOT be released with successful TODO tests.  As soon
 as a TODO test starts working, it should be promoted to a normal test
-and the new feature should be documented in the release notes.
+and the newly minted feature should be documented in the release
+notes.
 
 =back
 
+=head1 ONFAIL
+
+  BEGIN { plan test => 4, onfail => sub { warn "CALL 911!" } }
+
+The test failures can trigger extra diagnostics at the end of the test
+run.  C<onfail> is passed an array ref of hash refs that describe each
+test failure.  Each hash will contain at least the following fields:
+package, repetition, and result.  (The file, line, and test number are
+not included because their correspondance to a particular test is
+fairly weak.)  If the test had an expected value or a diagnostic
+string, these will also be included.
+
+This optional feature might be used simply to print out the version of
+your package and/or how to report problems.  It might also be used to
+generate extremely sophisticated diagnostics for a particular test
+failure.  It's not a panacea, however.  Core dumps or other
+unrecoverable errors will prevent the C<onfail> hook from running.
+(It is run inside an END block.)  Besides, C<onfail> is probably
+over-kill in the majority of cases.  (Your test code should be simpler
+than the code it is testing, yes?)
+
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 
 L<Test::Harness> and various test coverage analysis tools.
index 8102ff4..e2c47d6 100644 (file)
@@ -68,7 +68,9 @@ sub runtests {
        my $s = $switches;
        $s .= q[ "-T"] if $first =~ /^#!.*\bperl.*-\w*T/;
        $fh->close or print "can't close $test. $!\n";
-       my $cmd = "$^X $s $test|";
+       my $cmd = ($ENV{'COMPILE_TEST'})? 
+"./perl -I../lib ../utils/perlcc $test -run -verbose dcf -log ./compilelog |" 
+                                                                                                                       :  "$^X $s $test|";
        $cmd = "MCR $cmd" if $^O eq 'VMS';
        $fh->open($cmd) or print "can't run $test. $!\n";
        $ok = $next = $max = 0;
index 0d9a7d3..094d3df 100644 (file)
@@ -275,7 +275,9 @@ sub print { ## public
        if ($_[0] =~ /$nextpat/) {
                *S = shift;
        }
-       print S @_;
+
+       local $out = join $, , @_;
+       syswrite(S, $out, length $out);
        if( $chat'debug ){
                print STDERR "printed:";
                print STDERR @_;
index a4a1b1a..3ca0adc 100644 (file)
@@ -178,7 +178,8 @@ $inhibit_exit = $option{PrintRet} = 1;
                  globPrint PrintRet UsageOnly frame AutoTrace
                  TTY noTTY ReadLine NonStop LineInfo maxTraceLen
                  recallCommand ShellBang pager tkRunning ornaments
-                 signalLevel warnLevel dieLevel inhibit_exit);
+                 signalLevel warnLevel dieLevel inhibit_exit
+                 ImmediateStop);
 
 %optionVars    = (
                 hashDepth      => \$dumpvar::hashDepth,
@@ -194,6 +195,7 @@ $inhibit_exit = $option{PrintRet} = 1;
                 AutoTrace      => \$trace,
                 inhibit_exit   => \$inhibit_exit,
                 maxTraceLen    => \$maxtrace,
+                ImmediateStop  => \$ImmediateStop,
 );
 
 %optionAction  = (
@@ -363,6 +365,9 @@ sub DB {
        }
        $single = 0;
        # return;                       # Would not print trace!
+      } elsif ($ImmediateStop) {
+       $ImmediateStop = 0;
+       $signal = 1;
       }
     }
     $runnonstop = 0 if $single or $signal; # Disable it if interactive.
@@ -1255,6 +1260,10 @@ sub postponed_sub {
 }
 
 sub postponed {
+  if ($ImmediateStop) {
+    $ImmediateStop = 0;
+    $signal = 1;
+  }
   return &postponed_sub
     unless ref \$_[0] eq 'GLOB'; # A subroutine is compiled.
   # Cannot be done before the file is compiled
@@ -1795,6 +1804,7 @@ B<O> [I<opt>[B<=>I<val>]] [I<opt>B<\">I<val>B<\">] [I<opt>B<?>]...
     I<tkRunning>:                      run Tk while prompting (with ReadLine);
     I<signalLevel> I<warnLevel> I<dieLevel>:   level of verbosity;
     I<inhibit_exit>            Allows stepping off the end of the script.
+    I<ImmediateStop>           Debugger should stop as early as possible.
   The following options affect what happens with B<V>, B<X>, and B<x> commands:
     I<arrayDepth>, I<hashDepth>:       print only first N elements ('' for all);
     I<compactDump>, I<veryCompact>:    change style of array and hash dump;
index 176af38..d9eaba1 100644 (file)
@@ -38,6 +38,7 @@ use symbolic references (see L<perlref>).
 =item C<strict vars>
 
 This generates a compile-time error if you access a variable that wasn't
+declared via C<use vars>,
 localized via C<my()> or wasn't fully qualified.  Because this is to avoid
 variable suicide problems and subtle dynamic scoping issues, a merely
 local() variable isn't good enough.  See L<perlfunc/my> and
@@ -48,6 +49,10 @@ L<perlfunc/local>.
     my $foo = 10;       # ok, my() var
     local $foo = 9;     # blows up
 
+    package Cinna;
+    use vars qw/ $bar /;       # Declares $bar in current package
+    $bar = 'HgS';              # ok, global declared via pragma
+
 The local() generated a compile-time error because you just touched a global
 name without fully qualifying it.
 
@@ -80,6 +85,14 @@ subs => 0x00000200,
 vars => 0x00000400
 );
 
+$strict::VERSION = "1.01";
+
+my %bitmask = (
+refs => 0x00000002,
+subs => 0x00000200,
+vars => 0x00000400
+);
+
 sub bits {
     my $bits = 0;
     foreach my $s (@_){ $bits |= $bitmask{$s} || 0; };
diff --git a/op.c b/op.c
index 704ccde..1f564de 100644 (file)
--- a/op.c
+++ b/op.c
@@ -1045,8 +1045,6 @@ modkids(OP *o, I32 type)
     return o;
 }
 
-static I32 modcount;
-
 OP *
 mod(OP *o, I32 type)
 {
@@ -2422,6 +2420,7 @@ newASSIGNOP(I32 flags, OP *left, I32 optype, OP *right)
     }
 
     if (list_assignment(left)) {
+       dTHR;
        modcount = 0;
        eval_start = right;     /* Grandfathering $[ assignment here.  Bletch.*/
        left = mod(left, OP_AASSIGN);
index a46b7a5..344939c 100644 (file)
@@ -166,3 +166,7 @@ after 5.004_03:
 
 after 5.004_53:
        Minimal thread support added.  One needs to manually move pthread.h
+
+after 5.004_64:
+       Make DLL names different if thread-enabled.
+       Emit more informative internal DLL descriptions.
index 5506a39..fd3766e 100644 (file)
@@ -6,8 +6,17 @@
 # Additional rules supported: perl_, aout_test, aout_install, use them
 # for a.out style perl (which may fork).
 
+perl_version="5.00${PATCHLEVEL}_$SUBVERSION"
+case "$archname" in
+ *-thread)     dll_post=_thr 
+               perl_version="${perl_version}-threaded";;
+ *)            dll_post='' ;;
+esac
+
 $spitshell >>Makefile <<!GROK!THIS!
 
+PERL_VERSION = $perl_version
+
 AOUT_OPTIMIZE = $optimize
 AOUT_CCCMD     = \$(CC) $aout_ccflags \$(AOUT_OPTIMIZE)
 AOUT_AR                = $aout_ar
@@ -22,13 +31,16 @@ AOUT_CLDFLAGS_DLL   = -Zexe -Zmt -Zcrtdll -Zstack 32000
 
 LD_OPT         = $optimize
 
+PERL_DLL_BASE  = perl$dll_post
+PERL_DLL       = \$(PERL_DLL_BASE)\$(DLSUFFIX)
+
 !GROK!THIS!
 
 $spitshell >>Makefile <<'!NO!SUBS!'
-$(LIBPERL): perl.imp perl.dll perl5.def
+$(LIBPERL): perl.imp $(PERL_DLL) perl5.def
        emximp -o $(LIBPERL) perl.imp
 
-$(AOUT_LIBPERL_DLL): perl.imp perl.dll perl5.def
+$(AOUT_LIBPERL_DLL): perl.imp $(PERL_DLL) perl5.def
        emximp -o $(AOUT_LIBPERL_DLL) perl.imp
 
 perl.imp: perl5.def
@@ -38,12 +50,12 @@ perl.imp: perl5.def
        echo    'emx_malloc             emxlibcm        402     ?' >> $@
        echo    'emx_realloc            emxlibcm        403     ?' >> $@
 
-perl.dll: $(obj) perl5.def perl$(OBJ_EXT)
+$(PERL_DLL): $(obj) perl5.def perl$(OBJ_EXT)
        $(LD) $(LD_OPT) $(LDDLFLAGS) -o $@ perl$(OBJ_EXT) $(obj) $(libs) perl5.def
 
 perl5.def: perl.linkexp
-       echo "LIBRARY 'Perl' INITINSTANCE TERMINSTANCE" > $@
-       echo DESCRIPTION "'Perl interpreter, export autogenerated'"     >>$@
+       echo "LIBRARY '$(PERL_DLL_BASE)' INITINSTANCE TERMINSTANCE"     > $@
+       echo DESCRIPTION "'Perl interpreter v$(PERL_VERSION), export autogenerated'"    >>$@
        echo STACKSIZE 32768                            >>$@
        echo CODE LOADONCALL                            >>$@
        echo DATA LOADONCALL NONSHARED MULTIPLE         >>$@
@@ -68,7 +80,7 @@ perl.exports: perl.exp EXTERN.h perl.h
                $(CC) -DEMBED  -E - | \
                awk '{if ($$2 == "") print $$1}' | sort | uniq > $@
 
-perl.linkexp: perl.exports perl.map
+perl.linkexp: perl.exports perl.map  os2/os2.sym
        cat perl.exports os2/os2.sym perl.map | sort | uniq -d | sed -e 's/\w\+/  "\0"/' > perl.linkexp
 
 # We link miniperl statically, since .DLL depends on $(DYNALOADER) 
index d4050ac..94d25e2 100644 (file)
--- a/os2/os2.c
+++ b/os2/os2.c
@@ -40,16 +40,16 @@ const char *pthreads_states[] = {
 
 typedef struct {
     void *status;
-    pthread_cond_t cond;
+    perl_cond cond;
     enum pthreads_state state;
 } thread_join_t;
 
 thread_join_t *thread_join_data;
 int thread_join_count;
-pthread_mutex_t start_thread_mutex;
+perl_mutex start_thread_mutex;
 
 int
-pthread_join(pthread_t tid, void **status)
+pthread_join(perl_os_thread tid, void **status)
 {
     MUTEX_LOCK(&start_thread_mutex);
     switch (thread_join_data[tid].state) {
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ pthread_startit(void *arg)
 }
 
 int
-pthread_create(pthread_t *tid, const pthread_attr_t *attr, 
+pthread_create(perl_os_thread *tid, const pthread_attr_t *attr, 
               void *(*start_routine)(void*), void *arg)
 {
     void *args[2];
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ pthread_create(pthread_t *tid, const pthread_attr_t *attr,
 }
 
 int 
-pthread_detach(pthread_t tid)
+pthread_detach(perl_os_thread tid)
 {
     MUTEX_LOCK(&start_thread_mutex);
     switch (thread_join_data[tid].state) {
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ pthread_detach(pthread_t tid)
 
 /* This is a very bastardized version: */
 int
-os2_cond_wait(pthread_cond_t *c, pthread_mutex_t *m)
+os2_cond_wait(perl_cond *c, perl_mutex *m)
 {                                              
     int rc;
     if ((rc = DosResetEventSem(*c,&na)) && (rc != ERROR_ALREADY_RESET))
@@ -963,6 +963,9 @@ mod2fname(sv)
        }
        avlen --;
     }
+#ifdef USE_THREADS
+    sum++;                             /* Avoid conflict of DLLs in memory. */
+#endif 
     fname[pos] = 'A' + (sum % 26);
     fname[pos + 1] = 'A' + (sum / 26 % 26);
     fname[pos + 2] = '\0';
index 44dec3f..d56fe16 100644 (file)
@@ -1,10 +1,16 @@
 #include <sys/builtin.h>
 #include <sys/fmutex.h>
 #include <sys/rmutex.h>
-typedef int pthread_t;
-typedef _rmutex pthread_mutex_t;
-/*typedef HEV pthread_cond_t;*/
-typedef unsigned long pthread_cond_t;
-typedef int pthread_key_t;
+typedef int perl_os_thread;
+
+typedef _rmutex perl_mutex;
+
+/*typedef HEV perl_cond;*/     /* Will include os2.h into all C files.  */
+typedef unsigned long perl_cond;
+
+typedef int perl_key;
+
 typedef unsigned long pthread_attr_t;
 #define PTHREADS_INCLUDED
+#define pthread_attr_init(arg) 0
+#define pthread_attr_setdetachstate(arg1,arg2) 0
index be0c773..292d76f 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 #ifndef __PATCHLEVEL_H_INCLUDED__
 #define PATCHLEVEL 4
-#define SUBVERSION 64
+#define SUBVERSION 65
 
 /*
        local_patches -- list of locally applied less-than-subversion patches.
diff --git a/perl.c b/perl.c
index 16c5b9f..464a49b 100644 (file)
--- a/perl.c
+++ b/perl.c
@@ -699,7 +699,7 @@ setuid perl scripts securely.\n");
            if (euid != uid || egid != gid)
                croak("No -e allowed in setuid scripts");
            if (!e_fp) {
-#ifdef HAS_UMASK
+#if defined(HAS_UMASK) && !defined(VMS)
                int oldumask = PerlLIO_umask(0177);
 #endif
                e_tmpname = savepv(TMPPATH);
@@ -726,7 +726,7 @@ setuid perl scripts securely.\n");
 #endif
                if (!e_fp)
                    croak("Cannot create temporary file \"%s\"", e_tmpname);
-#ifdef HAS_UMASK
+#if defined(HAS_UMASK) && !defined(VMS)
                (void)PerlLIO_umask(oldumask);
 #endif
            }
diff --git a/perl.h b/perl.h
index 537da4f..42250ed 100644 (file)
--- a/perl.h
+++ b/perl.h
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ register struct op *op asm(stringify(OP_IN_REGISTER));
 #define SOFT_CAST(type)        (type)
 #endif
 
-#ifndef BYTEORDER
+#ifndef BYTEORDER  /* Should never happen -- byteorder is in config.h */
 #   define BYTEORDER 0x1234
 #endif
 
@@ -695,12 +695,21 @@ Free_t   Perl_free _((Malloc_t where));
 #   ifdef convex
 #      define Quad_t long long
 #   else
-#      if BYTEORDER > 0xFFFF
+#      if LONGSIZE == 8
 #          define Quad_t long
 #      endif
 #   endif
 #endif
 
+/* XXX Experimental set-up for long long.  Just add -DUSE_LONG_LONG
+   to your ccflags.  --Andy Dougherty   4/1998
+*/
+#ifdef USE_LONG_LONG
+#  if defined(HAS_LONG_LONG) && LONGLONGSIZE == 8
+#    define Quad_t long long
+#  endif
+#endif
+
 #ifdef Quad_t
 #   define HAS_QUAD
     typedef Quad_t IV;
index 463c094..6916622 100644 (file)
  *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
  *     contains pw_comment.
  */
+/* PWGECOS:
+ *     This symbol, if defined, indicates to the C program that struct passwd
+ *     contains pw_gecos.
+ */
 #define I_PWD          /**/
 #undef PWQUOTA /**/
 #undef PWAGE   /**/
 #undef PWCHANGE        /**/
 #undef PWCLASS /**/
 #undef PWEXPIRE        /**/
+#define PWGECOS        /**/
 #undef PWCOMMENT       /**/
 
 /* I_STDDEF:
index 7eeabd9..e9623a6 100644 (file)
@@ -9,6 +9,7 @@ POD2HTML = pod2html \
 all: $(CONVERTERS) man
 
 PERL = ../miniperl
+REALPERL = ../perl
 
 POD = \
        perl.pod        \
@@ -240,7 +241,7 @@ toc:
 clean:
        rm -f $(MAN) $(HTML) $(TEX)
        rm -f pod2html-*cache
-       rm -f *.aux *.log
+       rm -f *.aux *.log *.exe
 
 realclean:     clean
        rm -f $(CONVERTERS)
@@ -267,4 +268,7 @@ pod2text:   pod2text.PL ../lib/Config.pm
 checkpods:     checkpods.PL ../lib/Config.pm
        $(PERL) -I ../lib checkpods.PL
 
+compile: all
+       $(REALPERL) -I../lib ../utils/perlcc -regex 's/$$/.exe/' pod2latex pod2man pod2text checkpods -prog -verbose dcf -log ../compilelog;
 
+       
index a02fd5c..8937c7e 100644 (file)
@@ -290,6 +290,14 @@ For example, this will print out C<$foo> every time line
 
 Delete all installed actions.
 
+=item W [expr]
+
+Add a global watch-expression.
+
+=item W
+
+Delete all watch-expressions.
+
 =item O [opt[=val]] [opt"val"] [opt?]...
 
 Set or query values of options.  val defaults to 1.  opt can
@@ -392,6 +400,10 @@ Dump arrays holding debugged files.
 
 Dump symbol tables of packages.
 
+=item C<DumpReused>
+
+Dump contents of "reused" addresses.
+
 =item C<quote>, C<HighBit>, C<undefPrint>
 
 Change style of string dump.  Default value of C<quote> is C<auto>, one
index 9443f38..4ec71c8 100644 (file)
 =head1 NAME
 
-perldelta - what's new for perl5.004
+perldelta - what's new for perl5.005
 
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-This document describes differences between the 5.003 release (as
-documented in I<Programming Perl>, second edition--the Camel Book) and
-this one.
+This document describes differences between the 5.004 release and this one.
 
-=head1 Supported Environments
-
-Perl5.004 builds out of the box on Unix, Plan 9, LynxOS, VMS, OS/2,
-QNX, AmigaOS, and Windows NT.  Perl runs on Windows 95 as well, but it
-cannot be built there, for lack of a reasonable command interpreter.
+=head1 Incompatible Changes
 
 =head1 Core Changes
 
-Most importantly, many bugs were fixed, including several security
-problems.  See the F<Changes> file in the distribution for details.
-
-=head2 List assignment to %ENV works
-
-C<%ENV = ()> and C<%ENV = @list> now work as expected (except on VMS
-where it generates a fatal error).
-
-=head2 "Can't locate Foo.pm in @INC" error now lists @INC
-
-=head2 Compilation option: Binary compatibility with 5.003
-
-There is a new Configure question that asks if you want to maintain
-binary compatibility with Perl 5.003.  If you choose binary
-compatibility, you do not have to recompile your extensions, but you
-might have symbol conflicts if you embed Perl in another application,
-just as in the 5.003 release.  By default, binary compatibility
-is preserved at the expense of symbol table pollution.
-
-=head2 $PERL5OPT environment variable
-
-You may now put Perl options in the $PERL5OPT environment variable.
-Unless Perl is running with taint checks, it will interpret this
-variable as if its contents had appeared on a "#!perl" line at the
-beginning of your script, except that hyphens are optional.  PERL5OPT
-may only be used to set the following switches: B<-[DIMUdmw]>.
-
-=head2 Limitations on B<-M>, B<-m>, and B<-T> options
-
-The C<-M> and C<-m> options are no longer allowed on the C<#!> line of
-a script.  If a script needs a module, it should invoke it with the
-C<use> pragma.
-
-The B<-T> option is also forbidden on the C<#!> line of a script,
-unless it was present on the Perl command line.  Due to the way C<#!>
-works, this usually means that B<-T> must be in the first argument.
-Thus:
-
-    #!/usr/bin/perl -T -w
-
-will probably work for an executable script invoked as C<scriptname>,
-while:
-
-    #!/usr/bin/perl -w -T
-
-will probably fail under the same conditions.  (Non-Unix systems will
-probably not follow this rule.)  But C<perl scriptname> is guaranteed
-to fail, since then there is no chance of B<-T> being found on the
-command line before it is found on the C<#!> line.
-
-=head2 More precise warnings
-
-If you removed the B<-w> option from your Perl 5.003 scripts because it
-made Perl too verbose, we recommend that you try putting it back when
-you upgrade to Perl 5.004.  Each new perl version tends to remove some
-undesirable warnings, while adding new warnings that may catch bugs in
-your scripts.
-
-=head2 Deprecated: Inherited C<AUTOLOAD> for non-methods
-
-Before Perl 5.004, C<AUTOLOAD> functions were looked up as methods
-(using the C<@ISA> hierarchy), even when the function to be autoloaded
-was called as a plain function (e.g. C<Foo::bar()>), not a method
-(e.g. C<Foo-E<gt>bar()> or C<$obj-E<gt>bar()>).
-
-Perl 5.005 will use method lookup only for methods' C<AUTOLOAD>s.
-However, there is a significant base of existing code that may be using
-the old behavior.  So, as an interim step, Perl 5.004 issues an optional
-warning when a non-method uses an inherited C<AUTOLOAD>.
-
-The simple rule is:  Inheritance will not work when autoloading
-non-methods.  The simple fix for old code is:  In any module that used to
-depend on inheriting C<AUTOLOAD> for non-methods from a base class named
-C<BaseClass>, execute C<*AUTOLOAD = \&BaseClass::AUTOLOAD> during startup.
-
-=head2 Previously deprecated %OVERLOAD is no longer usable
-
-Using %OVERLOAD to define overloading was deprecated in 5.003.
-Overloading is now defined using the overload pragma. %OVERLOAD is
-still used internally but should not be used by Perl scripts. See
-L<overload> for more details.
-
-=head2 Subroutine arguments created only when they're modified
-
-In Perl 5.004, nonexistent array and hash elements used as subroutine
-parameters are brought into existence only if they are actually
-assigned to (via C<@_>).
-
-Earlier versions of Perl vary in their handling of such arguments.
-Perl versions 5.002 and 5.003 always brought them into existence.
-Perl versions 5.000 and 5.001 brought them into existence only if
-they were not the first argument (which was almost certainly a bug).
-Earlier versions of Perl never brought them into existence.
-
-For example, given this code:
-
-     undef @a; undef %a;
-     sub show { print $_[0] };
-     sub change { $_[0]++ };
-     show($a[2]);
-     change($a{b});
-
-After this code executes in Perl 5.004, $a{b} exists but $a[2] does
-not.  In Perl 5.002 and 5.003, both $a{b} and $a[2] would have existed
-(but $a[2]'s value would have been undefined).
-
-=head2 Group vector changeable with C<$)>
-
-The C<$)> special variable has always (well, in Perl 5, at least)
-reflected not only the current effective group, but also the group list
-as returned by the C<getgroups()> C function (if there is one).
-However, until this release, there has not been a way to call the
-C<setgroups()> C function from Perl.
-
-In Perl 5.004, assigning to C<$)> is exactly symmetrical with examining
-it: The first number in its string value is used as the effective gid;
-if there are any numbers after the first one, they are passed to the
-C<setgroups()> C function (if there is one).
-
-=head2 Fixed parsing of $$<digit>, &$<digit>, etc.
-
-Perl versions before 5.004 misinterpreted any type marker followed by
-"$" and a digit.  For example, "$$0" was incorrectly taken to mean
-"${$}0" instead of "${$0}".  This bug is (mostly) fixed in Perl 5.004.
-
-However, the developers of Perl 5.004 could not fix this bug completely,
-because at least two widely-used modules depend on the old meaning of
-"$$0" in a string.  So Perl 5.004 still interprets "$$<digit>" in the
-old (broken) way inside strings; but it generates this message as a
-warning.  And in Perl 5.005, this special treatment will cease.
-
-=head2 Fixed localization of $<digit>, $&, etc.
-
-Perl versions before 5.004 did not always properly localize the
-regex-related special variables.  Perl 5.004 does localize them, as
-the documentation has always said it should.  This may result in $1,
-$2, etc. no longer being set where existing programs use them.
-
-=head2 No resetting of $. on implicit close
-
-The documentation for Perl 5.0 has always stated that C<$.> is I<not>
-reset when an already-open file handle is reopened with no intervening
-call to C<close>.  Due to a bug, perl versions 5.000 through 5.003
-I<did> reset C<$.> under that circumstance; Perl 5.004 does not.
-
-=head2 C<wantarray> may return undef
-
-The C<wantarray> operator returns true if a subroutine is expected to
-return a list, and false otherwise.  In Perl 5.004, C<wantarray> can
-also return the undefined value if a subroutine's return value will
-not be used at all, which allows subroutines to avoid a time-consuming
-calculation of a return value if it isn't going to be used.
-
-=head2 C<eval EXPR> determines value of EXPR in scalar context
-
-Perl (version 5) used to determine the value of EXPR inconsistently,
-sometimes incorrectly using the surrounding context for the determination.
-Now, the value of EXPR (before being parsed by eval) is always determined in
-a scalar context.  Once parsed, it is executed as before, by providing
-the context that the scope surrounding the eval provided.  This change
-makes the behavior Perl4 compatible, besides fixing bugs resulting from
-the inconsistent behavior.  This program:
-
-    @a = qw(time now is time);
-    print eval @a;
-    print '|', scalar eval @a;
-
-used to print something like "timenowis881399109|4", but now (and in perl4)
-prints "4|4".
-
-=head2 Changes to tainting checks
-
-A bug in previous versions may have failed to detect some insecure
-conditions when taint checks are turned on.  (Taint checks are used
-in setuid or setgid scripts, or when explicitly turned on with the
-C<-T> invocation option.)  Although it's unlikely, this may cause a
-previously-working script to now fail -- which should be construed
-as a blessing, since that indicates a potentially-serious security
-hole was just plugged.
-
-The new restrictions when tainting include:
-
-=over
-
-=item No glob() or <*>
-
-These operators may spawn the C shell (csh), which cannot be made
-safe.  This restriction will be lifted in a future version of Perl
-when globbing is implemented without the use of an external program.
-
-=item No spawning if tainted $CDPATH, $ENV, $BASH_ENV
-
-These environment variables may alter the behavior of spawned programs
-(especially shells) in ways that subvert security.  So now they are
-treated as dangerous, in the manner of $IFS and $PATH.
-
-=item No spawning if tainted $TERM doesn't look like a terminal name
-
-Some termcap libraries do unsafe things with $TERM.  However, it would be
-unnecessarily harsh to treat all $TERM values as unsafe, since only shell
-metacharacters can cause trouble in $TERM.  So a tainted $TERM is
-considered to be safe if it contains only alphanumerics, underscores,
-dashes, and colons, and unsafe if it contains other characters (including
-whitespace).
-
-=back
-
-=head2 New Opcode module and revised Safe module
-
-A new Opcode module supports the creation, manipulation and
-application of opcode masks.  The revised Safe module has a new API
-and is implemented using the new Opcode module.  Please read the new
-Opcode and Safe documentation.
-
-=head2 Embedding improvements
-
-In older versions of Perl it was not possible to create more than one
-Perl interpreter instance inside a single process without leaking like a
-sieve and/or crashing.  The bugs that caused this behavior have all been
-fixed.  However, you still must take care when embedding Perl in a C
-program.  See the updated perlembed manpage for tips on how to manage
-your interpreters.
-
-=head2 Internal change: FileHandle class based on IO::* classes
-
-File handles are now stored internally as type IO::Handle.  The
-FileHandle module is still supported for backwards compatibility, but
-it is now merely a front end to the IO::* modules -- specifically,
-IO::Handle, IO::Seekable, and IO::File.  We suggest, but do not
-require, that you use the IO::* modules in new code.
-
-In harmony with this change, C<*GLOB{FILEHANDLE}> is now just a
-backward-compatible synonym for C<*GLOB{IO}>.
-
-=head2 Internal change: PerlIO abstraction interface
-
-It is now possible to build Perl with AT&T's sfio IO package
-instead of stdio.  See L<perlapio> for more details, and
-the F<INSTALL> file for how to use it.
-
-=head2 New and changed syntax
-
-=over
-
-=item $coderef->(PARAMS)
-
-A subroutine reference may now be suffixed with an arrow and a
-(possibly empty) parameter list.  This syntax denotes a call of the
-referenced subroutine, with the given parameters (if any).
-
-This new syntax follows the pattern of S<C<$hashref-E<gt>{FOO}>> and
-S<C<$aryref-E<gt>[$foo]>>: You may now write S<C<&$subref($foo)>> as
-S<C<$subref-E<gt>($foo)>>.  All of these arrow terms may be chained;
-thus, S<C<&{$table-E<gt>{FOO}}($bar)>> may now be written
-S<C<$table-E<gt>{FOO}-E<gt>($bar)>>.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 New and changed builtin constants
-
-=over
-
-=item __PACKAGE__
-
-The current package name at compile time, or the undefined value if
-there is no current package (due to a C<package;> directive).  Like
-C<__FILE__> and C<__LINE__>, C<__PACKAGE__> does I<not> interpolate
-into strings.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 New and changed builtin variables
-
-=over
-
-=item $^E
-
-Extended error message on some platforms.  (Also known as
-$EXTENDED_OS_ERROR if you C<use English>).
-
-=item $^H
-
-The current set of syntax checks enabled by C<use strict>.  See the
-documentation of C<strict> for more details.  Not actually new, but
-newly documented.
-Because it is intended for internal use by Perl core components,
-there is no C<use English> long name for this variable.
-
-=item $^M
-
-By default, running out of memory it is not trappable.  However, if
-compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of C<$^M> as an emergency
-pool after die()ing with this message.  Suppose that your Perl were
-compiled with -DPERL_EMERGENCY_SBRK and used Perl's malloc.  Then
-
-    $^M = 'a' x (1<<16);
-
-would allocate a 64K buffer for use when in emergency.
-See the F<INSTALL> file for information on how to enable this option.
-As a disincentive to casual use of this advanced feature,
-there is no C<use English> long name for this variable.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 New and changed builtin functions
-
-=over
-
-=item delete on slices
-
-This now works.  (e.g. C<delete @ENV{'PATH', 'MANPATH'}>)
-
-=item flock
-
-is now supported on more platforms, prefers fcntl to lockf when
-emulating, and always flushes before (un)locking.
-
-=item printf and sprintf
-
-Perl now implements these functions itself; it doesn't use the C
-library function sprintf() any more, except for floating-point
-numbers, and even then only known flags are allowed.  As a result, it
-is now possible to know which conversions and flags will work, and
-what they will do.
-
-The new conversions in Perl's sprintf() are:
-
-   %i  a synonym for %d
-   %p  a pointer (the address of the Perl value, in hexadecimal)
-   %n  special: *stores* the number of characters output so far
-        into the next variable in the parameter list 
-
-The new flags that go between the C<%> and the conversion are:
-
-   #   prefix octal with "0", hex with "0x"
-   h   interpret integer as C type "short" or "unsigned short"
-   V   interpret integer as Perl's standard integer type
-
-Also, where a number would appear in the flags, an asterisk ("*") may
-be used instead, in which case Perl uses the next item in the
-parameter list as the given number (that is, as the field width or
-precision).  If a field width obtained through "*" is negative, it has
-the same effect as the '-' flag: left-justification.
-
-See L<perlfunc/sprintf> for a complete list of conversion and flags.
-
-=item keys as an lvalue
-
-As an lvalue, C<keys> allows you to increase the number of hash buckets
-allocated for the given hash.  This can gain you a measure of efficiency if
-you know the hash is going to get big.  (This is similar to pre-extending
-an array by assigning a larger number to $#array.)  If you say
-
-    keys %hash = 200;
-
-then C<%hash> will have at least 200 buckets allocated for it.  These
-buckets will be retained even if you do C<%hash = ()>; use C<undef
-%hash> if you want to free the storage while C<%hash> is still in scope.
-You can't shrink the number of buckets allocated for the hash using
-C<keys> in this way (but you needn't worry about doing this by accident,
-as trying has no effect).
-
-=item my() in Control Structures
-
-You can now use my() (with or without the parentheses) in the control
-expressions of control structures such as:
-
-    while (defined(my $line = <>)) {
-        $line = lc $line;
-    } continue {
-        print $line;
-    }
-
-    if ((my $answer = <STDIN>) =~ /^y(es)?$/i) {
-        user_agrees();
-    } elsif ($answer =~ /^n(o)?$/i) {
-        user_disagrees();
-    } else {
-        chomp $answer;
-        die "`$answer' is neither `yes' nor `no'";
-    }
-
-Also, you can declare a foreach loop control variable as lexical by
-preceding it with the word "my".  For example, in:
-
-    foreach my $i (1, 2, 3) {
-        some_function();
-    }
-
-$i is a lexical variable, and the scope of $i extends to the end of
-the loop, but not beyond it.
-
-Note that you still cannot use my() on global punctuation variables
-such as $_ and the like.
-
-=item pack() and unpack()
-
-A new format 'w' represents a BER compressed integer (as defined in
-ASN.1).  Its format is a sequence of one or more bytes, each of which
-provides seven bits of the total value, with the most significant
-first.  Bit eight of each byte is set, except for the last byte, in
-which bit eight is clear.
-
-If 'p' or 'P' are given undef as values, they now generate a NULL
-pointer.
-
-Both pack() and unpack() now fail when their templates contain invalid
-types.  (Invalid types used to be ignored.)
-
-=item sysseek()
-
-The new sysseek() operator is a variant of seek() that sets and gets the
-file's system read/write position, using the lseek(2) system call.  It is
-the only reliable way to seek before using sysread() or syswrite().  Its
-return value is the new position, or the undefined value on failure.
-
-=item use VERSION
-
-If the first argument to C<use> is a number, it is treated as a version
-number instead of a module name.  If the version of the Perl interpreter
-is less than VERSION, then an error message is printed and Perl exits
-immediately.  Because C<use> occurs at compile time, this check happens
-immediately during the compilation process, unlike C<require VERSION>,
-which waits until runtime for the check.  This is often useful if you
-need to check the current Perl version before C<use>ing library modules
-which have changed in incompatible ways from older versions of Perl.
-(We try not to do this more than we have to.)
-
-=item use Module VERSION LIST
-
-If the VERSION argument is present between Module and LIST, then the
-C<use> will call the VERSION method in class Module with the given
-version as an argument.  The default VERSION method, inherited from
-the UNIVERSAL class, croaks if the given version is larger than the
-value of the variable $Module::VERSION.  (Note that there is not a
-comma after VERSION!)
-
-This version-checking mechanism is similar to the one currently used
-in the Exporter module, but it is faster and can be used with modules
-that don't use the Exporter.  It is the recommended method for new
-code.
-
-=item prototype(FUNCTION)
-
-Returns the prototype of a function as a string (or C<undef> if the
-function has no prototype).  FUNCTION is a reference to or the name of the
-function whose prototype you want to retrieve.
-(Not actually new; just never documented before.)
-
-=item srand
-
-The default seed for C<srand>, which used to be C<time>, has been changed.
-Now it's a heady mix of difficult-to-predict system-dependent values,
-which should be sufficient for most everyday purposes.
-
-Previous to version 5.004, calling C<rand> without first calling C<srand>
-would yield the same sequence of random numbers on most or all machines.
-Now, when perl sees that you're calling C<rand> and haven't yet called
-C<srand>, it calls C<srand> with the default seed. You should still call
-C<srand> manually if your code might ever be run on a pre-5.004 system,
-of course, or if you want a seed other than the default.
-
-=item $_ as Default
-
-Functions documented in the Camel to default to $_ now in
-fact do, and all those that do are so documented in L<perlfunc>.
-
-=item C<m//gc> does not reset search position on failure
-
-The C<m//g> match iteration construct has always reset its target
-string's search position (which is visible through the C<pos> operator)
-when a match fails; as a result, the next C<m//g> match after a failure
-starts again at the beginning of the string.  With Perl 5.004, this
-reset may be disabled by adding the "c" (for "continue") modifier,
-i.e. C<m//gc>.  This feature, in conjunction with the C<\G> zero-width
-assertion, makes it possible to chain matches together.  See L<perlop>
-and L<perlre>.
-
-=item C<m//x> ignores whitespace before ?*+{}
-
-The C<m//x> construct has always been intended to ignore all unescaped
-whitespace.  However, before Perl 5.004, whitespace had the effect of
-escaping repeat modifiers like "*" or "?"; for example, C</a *b/x> was
-(mis)interpreted as C</a\*b/x>.  This bug has been fixed in 5.004.
-
-=item nested C<sub{}> closures work now
-
-Prior to the 5.004 release, nested anonymous functions didn't work
-right.  They do now.
-
-=item formats work right on changing lexicals
-
-Just like anonymous functions that contain lexical variables
-that change (like a lexical index variable for a C<foreach> loop),
-formats now work properly.  For example, this silently failed
-before (printed only zeros), but is fine now:
-
-    my $i;
-    foreach $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
-       write;
-    }
-    format =
-       my i is @#
-       $i
-    .
-
-However, it still fails (without a warning) if the foreach is within a
-subroutine:
-
-    my $i;
-    sub foo {
-      foreach $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
-       write;
-      }
-    }
-    foo;
-    format =
-       my i is @#
-       $i
-    .
-
-=back
-
-=head2 New builtin methods
-
-The C<UNIVERSAL> package automatically contains the following methods that
-are inherited by all other classes:
-
-=over
-
-=item isa(CLASS)
-
-C<isa> returns I<true> if its object is blessed into a subclass of C<CLASS>
-
-C<isa> is also exportable and can be called as a sub with two arguments. This
-allows the ability to check what a reference points to. Example:
-
-    use UNIVERSAL qw(isa);
-
-    if(isa($ref, 'ARRAY')) {
-       ...
-    }
-
-=item can(METHOD)
-
-C<can> checks to see if its object has a method called C<METHOD>,
-if it does then a reference to the sub is returned; if it does not then
-I<undef> is returned.
-
-=item VERSION( [NEED] )
-
-C<VERSION> returns the version number of the class (package).  If the
-NEED argument is given then it will check that the current version (as
-defined by the $VERSION variable in the given package) not less than
-NEED; it will die if this is not the case.  This method is normally
-called as a class method.  This method is called automatically by the
-C<VERSION> form of C<use>.
-
-    use A 1.2 qw(some imported subs);
-    # implies:
-    A->VERSION(1.2);
-
-=back
-
-B<NOTE:> C<can> directly uses Perl's internal code for method lookup, and
-C<isa> uses a very similar method and caching strategy. This may cause
-strange effects if the Perl code dynamically changes @ISA in any package.
-
-You may add other methods to the UNIVERSAL class via Perl or XS code.
-You do not need to C<use UNIVERSAL> in order to make these methods
-available to your program.  This is necessary only if you wish to
-have C<isa> available as a plain subroutine in the current package.
-
-=head2 TIEHANDLE now supported
-
-See L<perltie> for other kinds of tie()s.
-
-=over
-
-=item TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
-
-This is the constructor for the class.  That means it is expected to
-return an object of some sort. The reference can be used to
-hold some internal information.
-
-    sub TIEHANDLE {
-       print "<shout>\n";
-       my $i;
-       return bless \$i, shift;
-    }
-
-=item PRINT this, LIST
-
-This method will be triggered every time the tied handle is printed to.
-Beyond its self reference it also expects the list that was passed to
-the print function.
-
-    sub PRINT {
-       $r = shift;
-       $$r++;
-       return print join( $, => map {uc} @_), $\;
-    }
-
-=item PRINTF this, LIST
-
-This method will be triggered every time the tied handle is printed to
-with the C<printf()> function.
-Beyond its self reference it also expects the format and list that was
-passed to the printf function.
-
-    sub PRINTF {
-        shift;
-         my $fmt = shift;
-        print sprintf($fmt, @_)."\n";
-    }
-
-=item READ this LIST
-
-This method will be called when the handle is read from via the C<read>
-or C<sysread> functions.
-
-    sub READ {
-       $r = shift;
-       my($buf,$len,$offset) = @_;
-       print "READ called, \$buf=$buf, \$len=$len, \$offset=$offset";
-    }
-
-=item READLINE this
-
-This method will be called when the handle is read from. The method
-should return undef when there is no more data.
-
-    sub READLINE {
-       $r = shift;
-       return "PRINT called $$r times\n"
-    }
-
-=item GETC this
-
-This method will be called when the C<getc> function is called.
-
-    sub GETC { print "Don't GETC, Get Perl"; return "a"; }
-
-=item DESTROY this
-
-As with the other types of ties, this method will be called when the
-tied handle is about to be destroyed. This is useful for debugging and
-possibly for cleaning up.
-
-    sub DESTROY {
-       print "</shout>\n";
-    }
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Malloc enhancements
-
-If perl is compiled with the malloc included with the perl distribution
-(that is, if C<perl -V:d_mymalloc> is 'define') then you can print
-memory statistics at runtime by running Perl thusly:
-
-  env PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS=2 perl your_script_here
-
-The value of 2 means to print statistics after compilation and on
-exit; with a value of 1, the statistics are printed only on exit.
-(If you want the statistics at an arbitrary time, you'll need to
-install the optional module Devel::Peek.)
-
-Three new compilation flags are recognized by malloc.c.  (They have no
-effect if perl is compiled with system malloc().)
-
-=over
-
-=item -DPERL_EMERGENCY_SBRK
-
-If this macro is defined, running out of memory need not be a fatal
-error: a memory pool can allocated by assigning to the special
-variable C<$^M>.  See L<"$^M">.
-
-=item -DPACK_MALLOC
-
-Perl memory allocation is by bucket with sizes close to powers of two.
-Because of these malloc overhead may be big, especially for data of
-size exactly a power of two.  If C<PACK_MALLOC> is defined, perl uses
-a slightly different algorithm for small allocations (up to 64 bytes
-long), which makes it possible to have overhead down to 1 byte for
-allocations which are powers of two (and appear quite often).
-
-Expected memory savings (with 8-byte alignment in C<alignbytes>) is
-about 20% for typical Perl usage.  Expected slowdown due to additional
-malloc overhead is in fractions of a percent (hard to measure, because
-of the effect of saved memory on speed).
-
-=item -DTWO_POT_OPTIMIZE
-
-Similarly to C<PACK_MALLOC>, this macro improves allocations of data
-with size close to a power of two; but this works for big allocations
-(starting with 16K by default).  Such allocations are typical for big
-hashes and special-purpose scripts, especially image processing.
-
-On recent systems, the fact that perl requires 2M from system for 1M
-allocation will not affect speed of execution, since the tail of such
-a chunk is not going to be touched (and thus will not require real
-memory).  However, it may result in a premature out-of-memory error.
-So if you will be manipulating very large blocks with sizes close to
-powers of two, it would be wise to define this macro.
-
-Expected saving of memory is 0-100% (100% in applications which
-require most memory in such 2**n chunks); expected slowdown is
-negligible.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 Miscellaneous efficiency enhancements
-
-Functions that have an empty prototype and that do nothing but return
-a fixed value are now inlined (e.g. C<sub PI () { 3.14159 }>).
-
-Each unique hash key is only allocated once, no matter how many hashes
-have an entry with that key.  So even if you have 100 copies of the
-same hash, the hash keys never have to be reallocated.
-
-=head1 Support for More Operating Systems
-
-Support for the following operating systems is new in Perl 5.004.
-
-=head2 Win32
-
-Perl 5.004 now includes support for building a "native" perl under
-Windows NT, using the Microsoft Visual C++ compiler (versions 2.0
-and above) or the Borland C++ compiler (versions 5.02 and above).
-The resulting perl can be used under Windows 95 (if it
-is installed in the same directory locations as it got installed
-in Windows NT).  This port includes support for perl extension
-building tools like L<MakeMaker> and L<h2xs>, so that many extensions
-available on the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) can now be
-readily built under Windows NT.  See http://www.perl.com/ for more
-information on CPAN, and L<README.win32> for more details on how to
-get started with building this port.
-
-There is also support for building perl under the Cygwin32 environment.
-Cygwin32 is a set of GNU tools that make it possible to compile and run
-many UNIX programs under Windows NT by providing a mostly UNIX-like 
-interface for compilation and execution.  See L<README.cygwin32> for
-more details on this port, and how to obtain the Cygwin32 toolkit.
-
-=head2 Plan 9
-
-See L<README.plan9>.
-
-=head2 QNX
-
-See L<README.qnx>.
-
-=head2 AmigaOS
-
-See L<README.amigaos>.
-
-=head1 Pragmata
-
-Six new pragmatic modules exist:
-
-=over
-
-=item use autouse MODULE => qw(sub1 sub2 sub3)
-
-Defers C<require MODULE> until someone calls one of the specified
-subroutines (which must be exported by MODULE).  This pragma should be
-used with caution, and only when necessary.
-
-=item use blib
-
-=item use blib 'dir'
-
-Looks for MakeMaker-like I<'blib'> directory structure starting in
-I<dir> (or current directory) and working back up to five levels of
-parent directories.
-
-Intended for use on command line with B<-M> option as a way of testing
-arbitrary scripts against an uninstalled version of a package.
-
-=item use constant NAME => VALUE
-
-Provides a convenient interface for creating compile-time constants,
-See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions">.
-
-=item use locale
-
-Tells the compiler to enable (or disable) the use of POSIX locales for
-builtin operations.
-
-When C<use locale> is in effect, the current LC_CTYPE locale is used
-for regular expressions and case mapping; LC_COLLATE for string
-ordering; and LC_NUMERIC for numeric formating in printf and sprintf
-(but B<not> in print).  LC_NUMERIC is always used in write, since
-lexical scoping of formats is problematic at best.
-
-Each C<use locale> or C<no locale> affects statements to the end of
-the enclosing BLOCK or, if not inside a BLOCK, to the end of the
-current file.  Locales can be switched and queried with
-POSIX::setlocale().
-
-See L<perllocale> for more information.
-
-=item use ops
-
-Disable unsafe opcodes, or any named opcodes, when compiling Perl code.
-
-=item use vmsish
-
-Enable VMS-specific language features.  Currently, there are three
-VMS-specific features available: 'status', which makes C<$?> and
-C<system> return genuine VMS status values instead of emulating POSIX;
-'exit', which makes C<exit> take a genuine VMS status value instead of
-assuming that C<exit 1> is an error; and 'time', which makes all times
-relative to the local time zone, in the VMS tradition.
-
-=back
-
 =head1 Modules
 
 =head2 Required Updates
 
-Though Perl 5.004 is compatible with almost all modules that work
-with Perl 5.003, there are a few exceptions:
-
-    Module   Required Version for Perl 5.004
-    ------   -------------------------------
-    Filter   Filter-1.12
-    LWP      libwww-perl-5.08
-    Tk       Tk400.202 (-w makes noise)
-
-Also, the majordomo mailing list program, version 1.94.1, doesn't work
-with Perl 5.004 (nor with perl 4), because it executes an invalid
-regular expression.  This bug is fixed in majordomo version 1.94.2.
-
-=head2 Installation directories
-
-The I<installperl> script now places the Perl source files for
-extensions in the architecture-specific library directory, which is
-where the shared libraries for extensions have always been.  This
-change is intended to allow administrators to keep the Perl 5.004
-library directory unchanged from a previous version, without running
-the risk of binary incompatibility between extensions' Perl source and
-shared libraries.
-
-=head2 Module information summary
-
-Brand new modules, arranged by topic rather than strictly
-alphabetically:
-
-    CGI.pm               Web server interface ("Common Gateway Interface")
-    CGI/Apache.pm        Support for Apache's Perl module
-    CGI/Carp.pm          Log server errors with helpful context
-    CGI/Fast.pm          Support for FastCGI (persistent server process)
-    CGI/Push.pm          Support for server push
-    CGI/Switch.pm        Simple interface for multiple server types
-
-    CPAN                 Interface to Comprehensive Perl Archive Network
-    CPAN::FirstTime      Utility for creating CPAN configuration file
-    CPAN::Nox            Runs CPAN while avoiding compiled extensions
-
-    IO.pm                Top-level interface to IO::* classes
-    IO/File.pm           IO::File extension Perl module
-    IO/Handle.pm         IO::Handle extension Perl module
-    IO/Pipe.pm           IO::Pipe extension Perl module
-    IO/Seekable.pm       IO::Seekable extension Perl module
-    IO/Select.pm         IO::Select extension Perl module
-    IO/Socket.pm         IO::Socket extension Perl module
-
-    Opcode.pm            Disable named opcodes when compiling Perl code
-
-    ExtUtils/Embed.pm    Utilities for embedding Perl in C programs
-    ExtUtils/testlib.pm  Fixes up @INC to use just-built extension
-
-    FindBin.pm           Find path of currently executing program
-
-    Class/Struct.pm      Declare struct-like datatypes as Perl classes
-    File/stat.pm         By-name interface to Perl's builtin stat
-    Net/hostent.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin gethost*
-    Net/netent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getnet*
-    Net/protoent.pm      By-name interface to Perl's builtin getproto*
-    Net/servent.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin getserv*
-    Time/gmtime.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin gmtime
-    Time/localtime.pm    By-name interface to Perl's builtin localtime
-    Time/tm.pm           Internal object for Time::{gm,local}time
-    User/grent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getgr*
-    User/pwent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getpw*
-
-    Tie/RefHash.pm       Base class for tied hashes with references as keys
-
-    UNIVERSAL.pm         Base class for *ALL* classes
-
-=head2 Fcntl
-
-New constants in the existing Fcntl modules are now supported,
-provided that your operating system happens to support them:
-
-    F_GETOWN F_SETOWN
-    O_ASYNC O_DEFER O_DSYNC O_FSYNC O_SYNC
-    O_EXLOCK O_SHLOCK
-
-These constants are intended for use with the Perl operators sysopen()
-and fcntl() and the basic database modules like SDBM_File.  For the
-exact meaning of these and other Fcntl constants please refer to your
-operating system's documentation for fcntl() and open().
-
-In addition, the Fcntl module now provides these constants for use
-with the Perl operator flock():
-
-       LOCK_SH LOCK_EX LOCK_NB LOCK_UN
-
-These constants are defined in all environments (because where there is
-no flock() system call, Perl emulates it).  However, for historical
-reasons, these constants are not exported unless they are explicitly
-requested with the ":flock" tag (e.g. C<use Fcntl ':flock'>).
-
-=head2 IO
-
-The IO module provides a simple mechanism to load all of the IO modules at one
-go.  Currently this includes:
-
-     IO::Handle
-     IO::Seekable
-     IO::File
-     IO::Pipe
-     IO::Socket
-
-For more information on any of these modules, please see its
-respective documentation.
-
-=head2 Math::Complex
-
-The Math::Complex module has been totally rewritten, and now supports
-more operations.  These are overloaded:
-
-     + - * / ** <=> neg ~ abs sqrt exp log sin cos atan2 "" (stringify)
-
-And these functions are now exported:
-
-    pi i Re Im arg
-    log10 logn ln cbrt root
-    tan
-    csc sec cot
-    asin acos atan
-    acsc asec acot
-    sinh cosh tanh
-    csch sech coth
-    asinh acosh atanh
-    acsch asech acoth
-    cplx cplxe
-
-=head2 Math::Trig
-
-This new module provides a simpler interface to parts of Math::Complex for
-those who need trigonometric functions only for real numbers.
-
-=head2 DB_File
-
-There have been quite a few changes made to DB_File. Here are a few of
-the highlights:
-
-=over
-
-=item *
-
-Fixed a handful of bugs.
-
-=item *
-
-By public demand, added support for the standard hash function exists().
-
-=item *
-
-Made it compatible with Berkeley DB 1.86.
-
-=item *
-
-Made negative subscripts work with RECNO interface.
-
-=item *
-
-Changed the default flags from O_RDWR to O_CREAT|O_RDWR and the default
-mode from 0640 to 0666.
-
-=item *
-
-Made DB_File automatically import the open() constants (O_RDWR,
-O_CREAT etc.) from Fcntl, if available.
-
-=item *
-
-Updated documentation.
-
-=back
-
-Refer to the HISTORY section in DB_File.pm for a complete list of
-changes. Everything after DB_File 1.01 has been added since 5.003.
-
-=head2 Net::Ping
-
-Major rewrite - support added for both udp echo and real icmp pings.
-
-=head2 Object-oriented overrides for builtin operators
-
-Many of the Perl builtins returning lists now have
-object-oriented overrides.  These are:
-
-    File::stat
-    Net::hostent
-    Net::netent
-    Net::protoent
-    Net::servent
-    Time::gmtime
-    Time::localtime
-    User::grent
-    User::pwent
-
-For example, you can now say
-
-    use File::stat;
-    use User::pwent;
-    $his = (stat($filename)->st_uid == pwent($whoever)->pw_uid);
+    XXX Any???
 
 =head1 Utility Changes
 
-=head2 pod2html
-
-=over
-
-=item Sends converted HTML to standard output
-
-The I<pod2html> utility included with Perl 5.004 is entirely new.
-By default, it sends the converted HTML to its standard output,
-instead of writing it to a file like Perl 5.003's I<pod2html> did.
-Use the B<--outfile=FILENAME> option to write to a file.
-
-=back
-
-=head2 xsubpp
-
-=over
-
-=item C<void> XSUBs now default to returning nothing
-
-Due to a documentation/implementation bug in previous versions of
-Perl, XSUBs with a return type of C<void> have actually been
-returning one value.  Usually that value was the GV for the XSUB,
-but sometimes it was some already freed or reused value, which would
-sometimes lead to program failure.
-
-In Perl 5.004, if an XSUB is declared as returning C<void>, it
-actually returns no value, i.e. an empty list (though there is a
-backward-compatibility exception; see below).  If your XSUB really
-does return an SV, you should give it a return type of C<SV *>.
-
-For backward compatibility, I<xsubpp> tries to guess whether a
-C<void> XSUB is really C<void> or if it wants to return an C<SV *>.
-It does so by examining the text of the XSUB: if I<xsubpp> finds
-what looks like an assignment to C<ST(0)>, it assumes that the
-XSUB's return type is really C<SV *>.
-
-=back
-
 =head1 C Language API Changes
 
-=over
-
-=item C<gv_fetchmethod> and C<perl_call_sv>
-
-The C<gv_fetchmethod> function finds a method for an object, just like
-in Perl 5.003.  The GV it returns may be a method cache entry.
-However, in Perl 5.004, method cache entries are not visible to users;
-therefore, they can no longer be passed directly to C<perl_call_sv>.
-Instead, you should use the C<GvCV> macro on the GV to extract its CV,
-and pass the CV to C<perl_call_sv>.
-
-The most likely symptom of passing the result of C<gv_fetchmethod> to
-C<perl_call_sv> is Perl's producing an "Undefined subroutine called"
-error on the I<second> call to a given method (since there is no cache
-on the first call).
-
-=item C<perl_eval_pv>
-
-A new function handy for eval'ing strings of Perl code inside C code.
-This function returns the value from the eval statement, which can
-be used instead of fetching globals from the symbol table.  See
-L<perlguts>, L<perlembed> and L<perlcall> for details and examples.
-
-=item Extended API for manipulating hashes
-
-Internal handling of hash keys has changed.  The old hashtable API is
-still fully supported, and will likely remain so.  The additions to the
-API allow passing keys as C<SV*>s, so that C<tied> hashes can be given
-real scalars as keys rather than plain strings (nontied hashes still
-can only use strings as keys).  New extensions must use the new hash
-access functions and macros if they wish to use C<SV*> keys.  These
-additions also make it feasible to manipulate C<HE*>s (hash entries),
-which can be more efficient.  See L<perlguts> for details.
-
-=back
-
 =head1 Documentation Changes
 
-Many of the base and library pods were updated.  These
-new pods are included in section 1:
-
-=over
-
-=item L<perldelta>
-
-This document.
-
-=item L<perlfaq>
-
-Frequently asked questions.
-
-=item L<perllocale>
-
-Locale support (internationalization and localization).
-
-=item L<perltoot>
-
-Tutorial on Perl OO programming.
-
-=item L<perlapio>
-
-Perl internal IO abstraction interface.
-
-=item L<perlmodlib>
-
-Perl module library and recommended practice for module creation.
-Extracted from L<perlmod> (which is much smaller as a result).
-
-=item L<perldebug>
-
-Although not new, this has been massively updated.
-
-=item L<perlsec>
-
-Although not new, this has been massively updated.
-
-=back
-
-=head1 New Diagnostics
-
-Several new conditions will trigger warnings that were
-silent before.  Some only affect certain platforms.
-The following new warnings and errors outline these.
-These messages are classified as follows (listed in
-increasing order of desperation):
-
-   (W) A warning (optional).
-   (D) A deprecation (optional).
-   (S) A severe warning (mandatory).
-   (F) A fatal error (trappable).
-   (P) An internal error you should never see (trappable).
-   (X) A very fatal error (nontrappable).
-   (A) An alien error message (not generated by Perl).
-
-=over
-
-=item "my" variable %s masks earlier declaration in same scope
-
-(W) A lexical variable has been redeclared in the same scope, effectively
-eliminating all access to the previous instance.  This is almost always
-a typographical error.  Note that the earlier variable will still exist
-until the end of the scope or until all closure referents to it are
-destroyed.
-
-=item %s argument is not a HASH element or slice
-
-(F) The argument to delete() must be either a hash element, such as
-
-    $foo{$bar}
-    $ref->[12]->{"susie"}
-
-or a hash slice, such as
-
-    @foo{$bar, $baz, $xyzzy}
-    @{$ref->[12]}{"susie", "queue"}
-
-=item Allocation too large: %lx
-
-(X) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MS-DOS machine.
-
-=item Allocation too large
-
-(F) You can't allocate more than 2^31+"small amount" bytes.
-
-=item Applying %s to %s will act on scalar(%s)
-
-(W) The pattern match (//), substitution (s///), and transliteration (tr///)
-operators work on scalar values.  If you apply one of them to an array
-or a hash, it will convert the array or hash to a scalar value -- the
-length of an array, or the population info of a hash -- and then work on
-that scalar value.  This is probably not what you meant to do.  See
-L<perlfunc/grep> and L<perlfunc/map> for alternatives.
-
-=item Attempt to free nonexistent shared string
-
-(P) Perl maintains a reference counted internal table of strings to
-optimize the storage and access of hash keys and other strings.  This
-indicates someone tried to decrement the reference count of a string
-that can no longer be found in the table.
-
-=item Attempt to use reference as lvalue in substr
-
-(W) You supplied a reference as the first argument to substr() used
-as an lvalue, which is pretty strange.  Perhaps you forgot to
-dereference it first.  See L<perlfunc/substr>.
-
-=item Bareword "%s" refers to nonexistent package
-
-(W) You used a qualified bareword of the form C<Foo::>, but
-the compiler saw no other uses of that namespace before that point.
-Perhaps you need to predeclare a package?
-
-=item Can't redefine active sort subroutine %s
-
-(F) Perl optimizes the internal handling of sort subroutines and keeps
-pointers into them.  You tried to redefine one such sort subroutine when it
-was currently active, which is not allowed.  If you really want to do
-this, you should write C<sort { &func } @x> instead of C<sort func @x>.
-
-=item Can't use bareword ("%s") as %s ref while "strict refs" in use
-
-(F) Only hard references are allowed by "strict refs".  Symbolic references
-are disallowed.  See L<perlref>.
-
-=item Cannot resolve method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
-
-(P) Internal error trying to resolve overloading specified by a method
-name (as opposed to a subroutine reference).
-
-=item Constant subroutine %s redefined
-
-(S) You redefined a subroutine which had previously been eligible for
-inlining.  See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for commentary and
-workarounds.
-
-=item Constant subroutine %s undefined
-
-(S) You undefined a subroutine which had previously been eligible for
-inlining.  See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for commentary and
-workarounds.
-
-=item Copy method did not return a reference
-
-(F) The method which overloads "=" is buggy. See L<overload/Copy Constructor>.
-
-=item Died
-
-(F) You passed die() an empty string (the equivalent of C<die "">) or
-you called it with no args and both C<$@> and C<$_> were empty.
-
-=item Exiting pseudo-block via %s
-
-(W) You are exiting a rather special block construct (like a sort block or
-subroutine) by unconventional means, such as a goto, or a loop control
-statement.  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
-
-=item Identifier too long
-
-(F) Perl limits identifiers (names for variables, functions, etc.) to
-252 characters for simple names, somewhat more for compound names (like
-C<$A::B>).  You've exceeded Perl's limits.  Future versions of Perl are
-likely to eliminate these arbitrary limitations.
-
-=item Illegal character %s (carriage return)
-
-(F) A carriage return character was found in the input.  This is an
-error, and not a warning, because carriage return characters can break
-multi-line strings, including here documents (e.g., C<print E<lt>E<lt>EOF;>).
-
-=item Illegal switch in PERL5OPT: %s
-
-(X) The PERL5OPT environment variable may only be used to set the
-following switches: B<-[DIMUdmw]>.
-
-=item Integer overflow in hex number
-
-(S) The literal hex number you have specified is too big for your
-architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest hex literal is
-0xFFFFFFFF.
-
-=item Integer overflow in octal number
-
-(S) The literal octal number you have specified is too big for your
-architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest octal literal is
-037777777777.
-
-=item internal error: glob failed
-
-(P) Something went wrong with the external program(s) used for C<glob>
-and C<E<lt>*.cE<gt>>.  This may mean that your csh (C shell) is
-broken.  If so, you should change all of the csh-related variables in
-config.sh:  If you have tcsh, make the variables refer to it as if it
-were csh (e.g. C<full_csh='/usr/bin/tcsh'>); otherwise, make them all
-empty (except that C<d_csh> should be C<'undef'>) so that Perl will
-think csh is missing.  In either case, after editing config.sh, run
-C<./Configure -S> and rebuild Perl.
-
-=item Invalid conversion in %s: "%s"
-
-(W) Perl does not understand the given format conversion.
-See L<perlfunc/sprintf>.
-
-=item Invalid type in pack: '%s'
-
-(F) The given character is not a valid pack type.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
-
-=item Invalid type in unpack: '%s'
-
-(F) The given character is not a valid unpack type.  See L<perlfunc/unpack>.
-
-=item Name "%s::%s" used only once: possible typo
-
-(W) Typographical errors often show up as unique variable names.
-If you had a good reason for having a unique name, then just mention
-it again somehow to suppress the message (the C<use vars> pragma is
-provided for just this purpose).
-
-=item Null picture in formline
-
-(F) The first argument to formline must be a valid format picture
-specification.  It was found to be empty, which probably means you
-supplied it an uninitialized value.  See L<perlform>.
-
-=item Offset outside string
-
-(F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with an offset
-pointing outside the buffer.  This is difficult to imagine.
-The sole exception to this is that C<sysread()>ing past the buffer
-will extend the buffer and zero pad the new area.
-
-=item Out of memory!
-
-(X|F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
-remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request.
-
-The request was judged to be small, so the possibility to trap it
-depends on the way Perl was compiled.  By default it is not trappable.
-However, if compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of C<$^M> as
-an emergency pool after die()ing with this message.  In this case the
-error is trappable I<once>.
-
-=item Out of memory during request for %s
-
-(F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
-remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request. However,
-the request was judged large enough (compile-time default is 64K), so
-a possibility to shut down by trapping this error is granted.
-
-=item panic: frexp
-
-(P) The library function frexp() failed, making printf("%f") impossible.
-
-=item Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list
-
-(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; as with literal
-strings, comment characters are not ignored, but are instead treated
-as literal data.  (You may have used different delimiters than the
-exclamation marks parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
-used.)
-
-You probably wrote something like this:
-
-    @list = qw(
-        a # a comment
-        b # another comment
-    );
-
-when you should have written this:
-
-    @list = qw(
-        a
-        b
-    );
-
-If you really want comments, build your list the
-old-fashioned way, with quotes and commas:
-
-    @list = (
-        'a',    # a comment
-        'b',    # another comment
-    );
-
-=item Possible attempt to separate words with commas
-
-(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; therefore commas
-aren't needed to separate the items. (You may have used different
-delimiters than the parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
-used.)
-
-You probably wrote something like this:
-
-    qw! a, b, c !;
-
-which puts literal commas into some of the list items.  Write it without
-commas if you don't want them to appear in your data:
-
-    qw! a b c !;
-
-=item Scalar value @%s{%s} better written as $%s{%s}
-
-(W) You've used a hash slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of
-a hash.  Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $).
-The difference is that C<$foo{&bar}> always behaves like a scalar, both when
-assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while C<@foo{&bar}> behaves
-like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its
-subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.
-
-=item Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
-
-(P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importing stubs.
-Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to C<can>
-may break this.
-
-=item Too late for "B<-T>" option
-
-(X) The #! line (or local equivalent) in a Perl script contains the
-B<-T> option, but Perl was not invoked with B<-T> in its argument
-list.  This is an error because, by the time Perl discovers a B<-T> in
-a script, it's too late to properly taint everything from the
-environment.  So Perl gives up.
-
-=item untie attempted while %d inner references still exist
-
-(W) A copy of the object returned from C<tie> (or C<tied>) was still
-valid when C<untie> was called.
-
-=item Unrecognized character %s
-
-(F) The Perl parser has no idea what to do with the specified character
-in your Perl script (or eval).  Perhaps you tried to run a compressed
-script, a binary program, or a directory as a Perl program.
-
-=item Unsupported function fork
-
-(F) Your version of executable does not support forking.
-
-Note that under some systems, like OS/2, there may be different flavors of
-Perl executables, some of which may support fork, some not. Try changing
-the name you call Perl by to C<perl_>, C<perl__>, and so on.
-
-=item Use of "$$<digit>" to mean "${$}<digit>" is deprecated
-
-(D) Perl versions before 5.004 misinterpreted any type marker followed
-by "$" and a digit.  For example, "$$0" was incorrectly taken to mean
-"${$}0" instead of "${$0}".  This bug is (mostly) fixed in Perl 5.004.
-
-However, the developers of Perl 5.004 could not fix this bug completely,
-because at least two widely-used modules depend on the old meaning of
-"$$0" in a string.  So Perl 5.004 still interprets "$$<digit>" in the
-old (broken) way inside strings; but it generates this message as a
-warning.  And in Perl 5.005, this special treatment will cease.
-
-=item Value of %s can be "0"; test with defined()
-
-(W) In a conditional expression, you used <HANDLE>, <*> (glob), C<each()>,
-or C<readdir()> as a boolean value.  Each of these constructs can return a
-value of "0"; that would make the conditional expression false, which is
-probably not what you intended.  When using these constructs in conditional
-expressions, test their values with the C<defined> operator.
-
-=item Variable "%s" may be unavailable
-
-(W) An inner (nested) I<anonymous> subroutine is inside a I<named>
-subroutine, and outside that is another subroutine; and the anonymous
-(innermost) subroutine is referencing a lexical variable defined in
-the outermost subroutine.  For example:
-
-   sub outermost { my $a; sub middle { sub { $a } } }
-
-If the anonymous subroutine is called or referenced (directly or
-indirectly) from the outermost subroutine, it will share the variable
-as you would expect.  But if the anonymous subroutine is called or
-referenced when the outermost subroutine is not active, it will see
-the value of the shared variable as it was before and during the
-*first* call to the outermost subroutine, which is probably not what
-you want.
-
-In these circumstances, it is usually best to make the middle
-subroutine anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  Perl has specific
-support for shared variables in nested anonymous subroutines; a named
-subroutine in between interferes with this feature.
-
-=item Variable "%s" will not stay shared
-
-(W) An inner (nested) I<named> subroutine is referencing a lexical
-variable defined in an outer subroutine.
-
-When the inner subroutine is called, it will probably see the value of
-the outer subroutine's variable as it was before and during the
-*first* call to the outer subroutine; in this case, after the first
-call to the outer subroutine is complete, the inner and outer
-subroutines will no longer share a common value for the variable.  In
-other words, the variable will no longer be shared.
-
-Furthermore, if the outer subroutine is anonymous and references a
-lexical variable outside itself, then the outer and inner subroutines
-will I<never> share the given variable.
-
-This problem can usually be solved by making the inner subroutine
-anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  When inner anonymous subs that
-reference variables in outer subroutines are called or referenced,
-they are automatically rebound to the current values of such
-variables.
-
-=item Warning: something's wrong
-
-(W) You passed warn() an empty string (the equivalent of C<warn "">) or
-you called it with no args and C<$_> was empty.
-
-=item Ill-formed logical name |%s| in prime_env_iter
-
-(W) A warning peculiar to VMS.  A logical name was encountered when preparing
-to iterate over %ENV which violates the syntactic rules governing logical
-names.  Since it cannot be translated normally, it is skipped, and will not
-appear in %ENV.  This may be a benign occurrence, as some software packages
-might directly modify logical name tables and introduce nonstandard names,
-or it may indicate that a logical name table has been corrupted.
-
-=item Got an error from DosAllocMem
-
-(P) An error peculiar to OS/2.  Most probably you're using an obsolete
-version of Perl, and this should not happen anyway.
-
-=item Malformed PERLLIB_PREFIX
-
-(F) An error peculiar to OS/2.  PERLLIB_PREFIX should be of the form
-
-    prefix1;prefix2
-
-or
-
-    prefix1 prefix2
-
-with nonempty prefix1 and prefix2.  If C<prefix1> is indeed a prefix
-of a builtin library search path, prefix2 is substituted.  The error
-may appear if components are not found, or are too long.  See
-"PERLLIB_PREFIX" in F<README.os2>.
-
-=item PERL_SH_DIR too long
-
-(F) An error peculiar to OS/2. PERL_SH_DIR is the directory to find the
-C<sh>-shell in.  See "PERL_SH_DIR" in F<README.os2>.
-
-=item Process terminated by SIG%s
-
-(W) This is a standard message issued by OS/2 applications, while *nix
-applications die in silence.  It is considered a feature of the OS/2
-port.  One can easily disable this by appropriate sighandlers, see
-L<perlipc/"Signals">.  See also "Process terminated by SIGTERM/SIGINT"
-in F<README.os2>.
-
-=back
-
 =head1 BUGS
 
 If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the headers of
@@ -1592,18 +39,10 @@ analysed by the Perl porting team.
 
 The F<Changes> file for exhaustive details on what changed.
 
-The F<INSTALL> file for how to build Perl.  This file has been
-significantly updated for 5.004, so even veteran users should
-look through it.
+The F<INSTALL> file for how to build Perl.
 
 The F<README> file for general stuff.
 
-The F<Copying> file for copyright information.
+The F<Artistic> and F<Copying> files for copyright information.
 
 =head1 HISTORY
-
-Constructed by Tom Christiansen, grabbing material with permission
-from innumerable contributors, with kibitzing by more than a few Perl
-porters.
-
-Last update: Wed May 14 11:14:09 EDT 1997
diff --git a/pod/perldelta4.pod b/pod/perldelta4.pod
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..9443f38
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,1609 @@
+=head1 NAME
+
+perldelta - what's new for perl5.004
+
+=head1 DESCRIPTION
+
+This document describes differences between the 5.003 release (as
+documented in I<Programming Perl>, second edition--the Camel Book) and
+this one.
+
+=head1 Supported Environments
+
+Perl5.004 builds out of the box on Unix, Plan 9, LynxOS, VMS, OS/2,
+QNX, AmigaOS, and Windows NT.  Perl runs on Windows 95 as well, but it
+cannot be built there, for lack of a reasonable command interpreter.
+
+=head1 Core Changes
+
+Most importantly, many bugs were fixed, including several security
+problems.  See the F<Changes> file in the distribution for details.
+
+=head2 List assignment to %ENV works
+
+C<%ENV = ()> and C<%ENV = @list> now work as expected (except on VMS
+where it generates a fatal error).
+
+=head2 "Can't locate Foo.pm in @INC" error now lists @INC
+
+=head2 Compilation option: Binary compatibility with 5.003
+
+There is a new Configure question that asks if you want to maintain
+binary compatibility with Perl 5.003.  If you choose binary
+compatibility, you do not have to recompile your extensions, but you
+might have symbol conflicts if you embed Perl in another application,
+just as in the 5.003 release.  By default, binary compatibility
+is preserved at the expense of symbol table pollution.
+
+=head2 $PERL5OPT environment variable
+
+You may now put Perl options in the $PERL5OPT environment variable.
+Unless Perl is running with taint checks, it will interpret this
+variable as if its contents had appeared on a "#!perl" line at the
+beginning of your script, except that hyphens are optional.  PERL5OPT
+may only be used to set the following switches: B<-[DIMUdmw]>.
+
+=head2 Limitations on B<-M>, B<-m>, and B<-T> options
+
+The C<-M> and C<-m> options are no longer allowed on the C<#!> line of
+a script.  If a script needs a module, it should invoke it with the
+C<use> pragma.
+
+The B<-T> option is also forbidden on the C<#!> line of a script,
+unless it was present on the Perl command line.  Due to the way C<#!>
+works, this usually means that B<-T> must be in the first argument.
+Thus:
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl -T -w
+
+will probably work for an executable script invoked as C<scriptname>,
+while:
+
+    #!/usr/bin/perl -w -T
+
+will probably fail under the same conditions.  (Non-Unix systems will
+probably not follow this rule.)  But C<perl scriptname> is guaranteed
+to fail, since then there is no chance of B<-T> being found on the
+command line before it is found on the C<#!> line.
+
+=head2 More precise warnings
+
+If you removed the B<-w> option from your Perl 5.003 scripts because it
+made Perl too verbose, we recommend that you try putting it back when
+you upgrade to Perl 5.004.  Each new perl version tends to remove some
+undesirable warnings, while adding new warnings that may catch bugs in
+your scripts.
+
+=head2 Deprecated: Inherited C<AUTOLOAD> for non-methods
+
+Before Perl 5.004, C<AUTOLOAD> functions were looked up as methods
+(using the C<@ISA> hierarchy), even when the function to be autoloaded
+was called as a plain function (e.g. C<Foo::bar()>), not a method
+(e.g. C<Foo-E<gt>bar()> or C<$obj-E<gt>bar()>).
+
+Perl 5.005 will use method lookup only for methods' C<AUTOLOAD>s.
+However, there is a significant base of existing code that may be using
+the old behavior.  So, as an interim step, Perl 5.004 issues an optional
+warning when a non-method uses an inherited C<AUTOLOAD>.
+
+The simple rule is:  Inheritance will not work when autoloading
+non-methods.  The simple fix for old code is:  In any module that used to
+depend on inheriting C<AUTOLOAD> for non-methods from a base class named
+C<BaseClass>, execute C<*AUTOLOAD = \&BaseClass::AUTOLOAD> during startup.
+
+=head2 Previously deprecated %OVERLOAD is no longer usable
+
+Using %OVERLOAD to define overloading was deprecated in 5.003.
+Overloading is now defined using the overload pragma. %OVERLOAD is
+still used internally but should not be used by Perl scripts. See
+L<overload> for more details.
+
+=head2 Subroutine arguments created only when they're modified
+
+In Perl 5.004, nonexistent array and hash elements used as subroutine
+parameters are brought into existence only if they are actually
+assigned to (via C<@_>).
+
+Earlier versions of Perl vary in their handling of such arguments.
+Perl versions 5.002 and 5.003 always brought them into existence.
+Perl versions 5.000 and 5.001 brought them into existence only if
+they were not the first argument (which was almost certainly a bug).
+Earlier versions of Perl never brought them into existence.
+
+For example, given this code:
+
+     undef @a; undef %a;
+     sub show { print $_[0] };
+     sub change { $_[0]++ };
+     show($a[2]);
+     change($a{b});
+
+After this code executes in Perl 5.004, $a{b} exists but $a[2] does
+not.  In Perl 5.002 and 5.003, both $a{b} and $a[2] would have existed
+(but $a[2]'s value would have been undefined).
+
+=head2 Group vector changeable with C<$)>
+
+The C<$)> special variable has always (well, in Perl 5, at least)
+reflected not only the current effective group, but also the group list
+as returned by the C<getgroups()> C function (if there is one).
+However, until this release, there has not been a way to call the
+C<setgroups()> C function from Perl.
+
+In Perl 5.004, assigning to C<$)> is exactly symmetrical with examining
+it: The first number in its string value is used as the effective gid;
+if there are any numbers after the first one, they are passed to the
+C<setgroups()> C function (if there is one).
+
+=head2 Fixed parsing of $$<digit>, &$<digit>, etc.
+
+Perl versions before 5.004 misinterpreted any type marker followed by
+"$" and a digit.  For example, "$$0" was incorrectly taken to mean
+"${$}0" instead of "${$0}".  This bug is (mostly) fixed in Perl 5.004.
+
+However, the developers of Perl 5.004 could not fix this bug completely,
+because at least two widely-used modules depend on the old meaning of
+"$$0" in a string.  So Perl 5.004 still interprets "$$<digit>" in the
+old (broken) way inside strings; but it generates this message as a
+warning.  And in Perl 5.005, this special treatment will cease.
+
+=head2 Fixed localization of $<digit>, $&, etc.
+
+Perl versions before 5.004 did not always properly localize the
+regex-related special variables.  Perl 5.004 does localize them, as
+the documentation has always said it should.  This may result in $1,
+$2, etc. no longer being set where existing programs use them.
+
+=head2 No resetting of $. on implicit close
+
+The documentation for Perl 5.0 has always stated that C<$.> is I<not>
+reset when an already-open file handle is reopened with no intervening
+call to C<close>.  Due to a bug, perl versions 5.000 through 5.003
+I<did> reset C<$.> under that circumstance; Perl 5.004 does not.
+
+=head2 C<wantarray> may return undef
+
+The C<wantarray> operator returns true if a subroutine is expected to
+return a list, and false otherwise.  In Perl 5.004, C<wantarray> can
+also return the undefined value if a subroutine's return value will
+not be used at all, which allows subroutines to avoid a time-consuming
+calculation of a return value if it isn't going to be used.
+
+=head2 C<eval EXPR> determines value of EXPR in scalar context
+
+Perl (version 5) used to determine the value of EXPR inconsistently,
+sometimes incorrectly using the surrounding context for the determination.
+Now, the value of EXPR (before being parsed by eval) is always determined in
+a scalar context.  Once parsed, it is executed as before, by providing
+the context that the scope surrounding the eval provided.  This change
+makes the behavior Perl4 compatible, besides fixing bugs resulting from
+the inconsistent behavior.  This program:
+
+    @a = qw(time now is time);
+    print eval @a;
+    print '|', scalar eval @a;
+
+used to print something like "timenowis881399109|4", but now (and in perl4)
+prints "4|4".
+
+=head2 Changes to tainting checks
+
+A bug in previous versions may have failed to detect some insecure
+conditions when taint checks are turned on.  (Taint checks are used
+in setuid or setgid scripts, or when explicitly turned on with the
+C<-T> invocation option.)  Although it's unlikely, this may cause a
+previously-working script to now fail -- which should be construed
+as a blessing, since that indicates a potentially-serious security
+hole was just plugged.
+
+The new restrictions when tainting include:
+
+=over
+
+=item No glob() or <*>
+
+These operators may spawn the C shell (csh), which cannot be made
+safe.  This restriction will be lifted in a future version of Perl
+when globbing is implemented without the use of an external program.
+
+=item No spawning if tainted $CDPATH, $ENV, $BASH_ENV
+
+These environment variables may alter the behavior of spawned programs
+(especially shells) in ways that subvert security.  So now they are
+treated as dangerous, in the manner of $IFS and $PATH.
+
+=item No spawning if tainted $TERM doesn't look like a terminal name
+
+Some termcap libraries do unsafe things with $TERM.  However, it would be
+unnecessarily harsh to treat all $TERM values as unsafe, since only shell
+metacharacters can cause trouble in $TERM.  So a tainted $TERM is
+considered to be safe if it contains only alphanumerics, underscores,
+dashes, and colons, and unsafe if it contains other characters (including
+whitespace).
+
+=back
+
+=head2 New Opcode module and revised Safe module
+
+A new Opcode module supports the creation, manipulation and
+application of opcode masks.  The revised Safe module has a new API
+and is implemented using the new Opcode module.  Please read the new
+Opcode and Safe documentation.
+
+=head2 Embedding improvements
+
+In older versions of Perl it was not possible to create more than one
+Perl interpreter instance inside a single process without leaking like a
+sieve and/or crashing.  The bugs that caused this behavior have all been
+fixed.  However, you still must take care when embedding Perl in a C
+program.  See the updated perlembed manpage for tips on how to manage
+your interpreters.
+
+=head2 Internal change: FileHandle class based on IO::* classes
+
+File handles are now stored internally as type IO::Handle.  The
+FileHandle module is still supported for backwards compatibility, but
+it is now merely a front end to the IO::* modules -- specifically,
+IO::Handle, IO::Seekable, and IO::File.  We suggest, but do not
+require, that you use the IO::* modules in new code.
+
+In harmony with this change, C<*GLOB{FILEHANDLE}> is now just a
+backward-compatible synonym for C<*GLOB{IO}>.
+
+=head2 Internal change: PerlIO abstraction interface
+
+It is now possible to build Perl with AT&T's sfio IO package
+instead of stdio.  See L<perlapio> for more details, and
+the F<INSTALL> file for how to use it.
+
+=head2 New and changed syntax
+
+=over
+
+=item $coderef->(PARAMS)
+
+A subroutine reference may now be suffixed with an arrow and a
+(possibly empty) parameter list.  This syntax denotes a call of the
+referenced subroutine, with the given parameters (if any).
+
+This new syntax follows the pattern of S<C<$hashref-E<gt>{FOO}>> and
+S<C<$aryref-E<gt>[$foo]>>: You may now write S<C<&$subref($foo)>> as
+S<C<$subref-E<gt>($foo)>>.  All of these arrow terms may be chained;
+thus, S<C<&{$table-E<gt>{FOO}}($bar)>> may now be written
+S<C<$table-E<gt>{FOO}-E<gt>($bar)>>.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 New and changed builtin constants
+
+=over
+
+=item __PACKAGE__
+
+The current package name at compile time, or the undefined value if
+there is no current package (due to a C<package;> directive).  Like
+C<__FILE__> and C<__LINE__>, C<__PACKAGE__> does I<not> interpolate
+into strings.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 New and changed builtin variables
+
+=over
+
+=item $^E
+
+Extended error message on some platforms.  (Also known as
+$EXTENDED_OS_ERROR if you C<use English>).
+
+=item $^H
+
+The current set of syntax checks enabled by C<use strict>.  See the
+documentation of C<strict> for more details.  Not actually new, but
+newly documented.
+Because it is intended for internal use by Perl core components,
+there is no C<use English> long name for this variable.
+
+=item $^M
+
+By default, running out of memory it is not trappable.  However, if
+compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of C<$^M> as an emergency
+pool after die()ing with this message.  Suppose that your Perl were
+compiled with -DPERL_EMERGENCY_SBRK and used Perl's malloc.  Then
+
+    $^M = 'a' x (1<<16);
+
+would allocate a 64K buffer for use when in emergency.
+See the F<INSTALL> file for information on how to enable this option.
+As a disincentive to casual use of this advanced feature,
+there is no C<use English> long name for this variable.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 New and changed builtin functions
+
+=over
+
+=item delete on slices
+
+This now works.  (e.g. C<delete @ENV{'PATH', 'MANPATH'}>)
+
+=item flock
+
+is now supported on more platforms, prefers fcntl to lockf when
+emulating, and always flushes before (un)locking.
+
+=item printf and sprintf
+
+Perl now implements these functions itself; it doesn't use the C
+library function sprintf() any more, except for floating-point
+numbers, and even then only known flags are allowed.  As a result, it
+is now possible to know which conversions and flags will work, and
+what they will do.
+
+The new conversions in Perl's sprintf() are:
+
+   %i  a synonym for %d
+   %p  a pointer (the address of the Perl value, in hexadecimal)
+   %n  special: *stores* the number of characters output so far
+        into the next variable in the parameter list 
+
+The new flags that go between the C<%> and the conversion are:
+
+   #   prefix octal with "0", hex with "0x"
+   h   interpret integer as C type "short" or "unsigned short"
+   V   interpret integer as Perl's standard integer type
+
+Also, where a number would appear in the flags, an asterisk ("*") may
+be used instead, in which case Perl uses the next item in the
+parameter list as the given number (that is, as the field width or
+precision).  If a field width obtained through "*" is negative, it has
+the same effect as the '-' flag: left-justification.
+
+See L<perlfunc/sprintf> for a complete list of conversion and flags.
+
+=item keys as an lvalue
+
+As an lvalue, C<keys> allows you to increase the number of hash buckets
+allocated for the given hash.  This can gain you a measure of efficiency if
+you know the hash is going to get big.  (This is similar to pre-extending
+an array by assigning a larger number to $#array.)  If you say
+
+    keys %hash = 200;
+
+then C<%hash> will have at least 200 buckets allocated for it.  These
+buckets will be retained even if you do C<%hash = ()>; use C<undef
+%hash> if you want to free the storage while C<%hash> is still in scope.
+You can't shrink the number of buckets allocated for the hash using
+C<keys> in this way (but you needn't worry about doing this by accident,
+as trying has no effect).
+
+=item my() in Control Structures
+
+You can now use my() (with or without the parentheses) in the control
+expressions of control structures such as:
+
+    while (defined(my $line = <>)) {
+        $line = lc $line;
+    } continue {
+        print $line;
+    }
+
+    if ((my $answer = <STDIN>) =~ /^y(es)?$/i) {
+        user_agrees();
+    } elsif ($answer =~ /^n(o)?$/i) {
+        user_disagrees();
+    } else {
+        chomp $answer;
+        die "`$answer' is neither `yes' nor `no'";
+    }
+
+Also, you can declare a foreach loop control variable as lexical by
+preceding it with the word "my".  For example, in:
+
+    foreach my $i (1, 2, 3) {
+        some_function();
+    }
+
+$i is a lexical variable, and the scope of $i extends to the end of
+the loop, but not beyond it.
+
+Note that you still cannot use my() on global punctuation variables
+such as $_ and the like.
+
+=item pack() and unpack()
+
+A new format 'w' represents a BER compressed integer (as defined in
+ASN.1).  Its format is a sequence of one or more bytes, each of which
+provides seven bits of the total value, with the most significant
+first.  Bit eight of each byte is set, except for the last byte, in
+which bit eight is clear.
+
+If 'p' or 'P' are given undef as values, they now generate a NULL
+pointer.
+
+Both pack() and unpack() now fail when their templates contain invalid
+types.  (Invalid types used to be ignored.)
+
+=item sysseek()
+
+The new sysseek() operator is a variant of seek() that sets and gets the
+file's system read/write position, using the lseek(2) system call.  It is
+the only reliable way to seek before using sysread() or syswrite().  Its
+return value is the new position, or the undefined value on failure.
+
+=item use VERSION
+
+If the first argument to C<use> is a number, it is treated as a version
+number instead of a module name.  If the version of the Perl interpreter
+is less than VERSION, then an error message is printed and Perl exits
+immediately.  Because C<use> occurs at compile time, this check happens
+immediately during the compilation process, unlike C<require VERSION>,
+which waits until runtime for the check.  This is often useful if you
+need to check the current Perl version before C<use>ing library modules
+which have changed in incompatible ways from older versions of Perl.
+(We try not to do this more than we have to.)
+
+=item use Module VERSION LIST
+
+If the VERSION argument is present between Module and LIST, then the
+C<use> will call the VERSION method in class Module with the given
+version as an argument.  The default VERSION method, inherited from
+the UNIVERSAL class, croaks if the given version is larger than the
+value of the variable $Module::VERSION.  (Note that there is not a
+comma after VERSION!)
+
+This version-checking mechanism is similar to the one currently used
+in the Exporter module, but it is faster and can be used with modules
+that don't use the Exporter.  It is the recommended method for new
+code.
+
+=item prototype(FUNCTION)
+
+Returns the prototype of a function as a string (or C<undef> if the
+function has no prototype).  FUNCTION is a reference to or the name of the
+function whose prototype you want to retrieve.
+(Not actually new; just never documented before.)
+
+=item srand
+
+The default seed for C<srand>, which used to be C<time>, has been changed.
+Now it's a heady mix of difficult-to-predict system-dependent values,
+which should be sufficient for most everyday purposes.
+
+Previous to version 5.004, calling C<rand> without first calling C<srand>
+would yield the same sequence of random numbers on most or all machines.
+Now, when perl sees that you're calling C<rand> and haven't yet called
+C<srand>, it calls C<srand> with the default seed. You should still call
+C<srand> manually if your code might ever be run on a pre-5.004 system,
+of course, or if you want a seed other than the default.
+
+=item $_ as Default
+
+Functions documented in the Camel to default to $_ now in
+fact do, and all those that do are so documented in L<perlfunc>.
+
+=item C<m//gc> does not reset search position on failure
+
+The C<m//g> match iteration construct has always reset its target
+string's search position (which is visible through the C<pos> operator)
+when a match fails; as a result, the next C<m//g> match after a failure
+starts again at the beginning of the string.  With Perl 5.004, this
+reset may be disabled by adding the "c" (for "continue") modifier,
+i.e. C<m//gc>.  This feature, in conjunction with the C<\G> zero-width
+assertion, makes it possible to chain matches together.  See L<perlop>
+and L<perlre>.
+
+=item C<m//x> ignores whitespace before ?*+{}
+
+The C<m//x> construct has always been intended to ignore all unescaped
+whitespace.  However, before Perl 5.004, whitespace had the effect of
+escaping repeat modifiers like "*" or "?"; for example, C</a *b/x> was
+(mis)interpreted as C</a\*b/x>.  This bug has been fixed in 5.004.
+
+=item nested C<sub{}> closures work now
+
+Prior to the 5.004 release, nested anonymous functions didn't work
+right.  They do now.
+
+=item formats work right on changing lexicals
+
+Just like anonymous functions that contain lexical variables
+that change (like a lexical index variable for a C<foreach> loop),
+formats now work properly.  For example, this silently failed
+before (printed only zeros), but is fine now:
+
+    my $i;
+    foreach $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
+       write;
+    }
+    format =
+       my i is @#
+       $i
+    .
+
+However, it still fails (without a warning) if the foreach is within a
+subroutine:
+
+    my $i;
+    sub foo {
+      foreach $i ( 1 .. 10 ) {
+       write;
+      }
+    }
+    foo;
+    format =
+       my i is @#
+       $i
+    .
+
+=back
+
+=head2 New builtin methods
+
+The C<UNIVERSAL> package automatically contains the following methods that
+are inherited by all other classes:
+
+=over
+
+=item isa(CLASS)
+
+C<isa> returns I<true> if its object is blessed into a subclass of C<CLASS>
+
+C<isa> is also exportable and can be called as a sub with two arguments. This
+allows the ability to check what a reference points to. Example:
+
+    use UNIVERSAL qw(isa);
+
+    if(isa($ref, 'ARRAY')) {
+       ...
+    }
+
+=item can(METHOD)
+
+C<can> checks to see if its object has a method called C<METHOD>,
+if it does then a reference to the sub is returned; if it does not then
+I<undef> is returned.
+
+=item VERSION( [NEED] )
+
+C<VERSION> returns the version number of the class (package).  If the
+NEED argument is given then it will check that the current version (as
+defined by the $VERSION variable in the given package) not less than
+NEED; it will die if this is not the case.  This method is normally
+called as a class method.  This method is called automatically by the
+C<VERSION> form of C<use>.
+
+    use A 1.2 qw(some imported subs);
+    # implies:
+    A->VERSION(1.2);
+
+=back
+
+B<NOTE:> C<can> directly uses Perl's internal code for method lookup, and
+C<isa> uses a very similar method and caching strategy. This may cause
+strange effects if the Perl code dynamically changes @ISA in any package.
+
+You may add other methods to the UNIVERSAL class via Perl or XS code.
+You do not need to C<use UNIVERSAL> in order to make these methods
+available to your program.  This is necessary only if you wish to
+have C<isa> available as a plain subroutine in the current package.
+
+=head2 TIEHANDLE now supported
+
+See L<perltie> for other kinds of tie()s.
+
+=over
+
+=item TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
+
+This is the constructor for the class.  That means it is expected to
+return an object of some sort. The reference can be used to
+hold some internal information.
+
+    sub TIEHANDLE {
+       print "<shout>\n";
+       my $i;
+       return bless \$i, shift;
+    }
+
+=item PRINT this, LIST
+
+This method will be triggered every time the tied handle is printed to.
+Beyond its self reference it also expects the list that was passed to
+the print function.
+
+    sub PRINT {
+       $r = shift;
+       $$r++;
+       return print join( $, => map {uc} @_), $\;
+    }
+
+=item PRINTF this, LIST
+
+This method will be triggered every time the tied handle is printed to
+with the C<printf()> function.
+Beyond its self reference it also expects the format and list that was
+passed to the printf function.
+
+    sub PRINTF {
+        shift;
+         my $fmt = shift;
+        print sprintf($fmt, @_)."\n";
+    }
+
+=item READ this LIST
+
+This method will be called when the handle is read from via the C<read>
+or C<sysread> functions.
+
+    sub READ {
+       $r = shift;
+       my($buf,$len,$offset) = @_;
+       print "READ called, \$buf=$buf, \$len=$len, \$offset=$offset";
+    }
+
+=item READLINE this
+
+This method will be called when the handle is read from. The method
+should return undef when there is no more data.
+
+    sub READLINE {
+       $r = shift;
+       return "PRINT called $$r times\n"
+    }
+
+=item GETC this
+
+This method will be called when the C<getc> function is called.
+
+    sub GETC { print "Don't GETC, Get Perl"; return "a"; }
+
+=item DESTROY this
+
+As with the other types of ties, this method will be called when the
+tied handle is about to be destroyed. This is useful for debugging and
+possibly for cleaning up.
+
+    sub DESTROY {
+       print "</shout>\n";
+    }
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Malloc enhancements
+
+If perl is compiled with the malloc included with the perl distribution
+(that is, if C<perl -V:d_mymalloc> is 'define') then you can print
+memory statistics at runtime by running Perl thusly:
+
+  env PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS=2 perl your_script_here
+
+The value of 2 means to print statistics after compilation and on
+exit; with a value of 1, the statistics are printed only on exit.
+(If you want the statistics at an arbitrary time, you'll need to
+install the optional module Devel::Peek.)
+
+Three new compilation flags are recognized by malloc.c.  (They have no
+effect if perl is compiled with system malloc().)
+
+=over
+
+=item -DPERL_EMERGENCY_SBRK
+
+If this macro is defined, running out of memory need not be a fatal
+error: a memory pool can allocated by assigning to the special
+variable C<$^M>.  See L<"$^M">.
+
+=item -DPACK_MALLOC
+
+Perl memory allocation is by bucket with sizes close to powers of two.
+Because of these malloc overhead may be big, especially for data of
+size exactly a power of two.  If C<PACK_MALLOC> is defined, perl uses
+a slightly different algorithm for small allocations (up to 64 bytes
+long), which makes it possible to have overhead down to 1 byte for
+allocations which are powers of two (and appear quite often).
+
+Expected memory savings (with 8-byte alignment in C<alignbytes>) is
+about 20% for typical Perl usage.  Expected slowdown due to additional
+malloc overhead is in fractions of a percent (hard to measure, because
+of the effect of saved memory on speed).
+
+=item -DTWO_POT_OPTIMIZE
+
+Similarly to C<PACK_MALLOC>, this macro improves allocations of data
+with size close to a power of two; but this works for big allocations
+(starting with 16K by default).  Such allocations are typical for big
+hashes and special-purpose scripts, especially image processing.
+
+On recent systems, the fact that perl requires 2M from system for 1M
+allocation will not affect speed of execution, since the tail of such
+a chunk is not going to be touched (and thus will not require real
+memory).  However, it may result in a premature out-of-memory error.
+So if you will be manipulating very large blocks with sizes close to
+powers of two, it would be wise to define this macro.
+
+Expected saving of memory is 0-100% (100% in applications which
+require most memory in such 2**n chunks); expected slowdown is
+negligible.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 Miscellaneous efficiency enhancements
+
+Functions that have an empty prototype and that do nothing but return
+a fixed value are now inlined (e.g. C<sub PI () { 3.14159 }>).
+
+Each unique hash key is only allocated once, no matter how many hashes
+have an entry with that key.  So even if you have 100 copies of the
+same hash, the hash keys never have to be reallocated.
+
+=head1 Support for More Operating Systems
+
+Support for the following operating systems is new in Perl 5.004.
+
+=head2 Win32
+
+Perl 5.004 now includes support for building a "native" perl under
+Windows NT, using the Microsoft Visual C++ compiler (versions 2.0
+and above) or the Borland C++ compiler (versions 5.02 and above).
+The resulting perl can be used under Windows 95 (if it
+is installed in the same directory locations as it got installed
+in Windows NT).  This port includes support for perl extension
+building tools like L<MakeMaker> and L<h2xs>, so that many extensions
+available on the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) can now be
+readily built under Windows NT.  See http://www.perl.com/ for more
+information on CPAN, and L<README.win32> for more details on how to
+get started with building this port.
+
+There is also support for building perl under the Cygwin32 environment.
+Cygwin32 is a set of GNU tools that make it possible to compile and run
+many UNIX programs under Windows NT by providing a mostly UNIX-like 
+interface for compilation and execution.  See L<README.cygwin32> for
+more details on this port, and how to obtain the Cygwin32 toolkit.
+
+=head2 Plan 9
+
+See L<README.plan9>.
+
+=head2 QNX
+
+See L<README.qnx>.
+
+=head2 AmigaOS
+
+See L<README.amigaos>.
+
+=head1 Pragmata
+
+Six new pragmatic modules exist:
+
+=over
+
+=item use autouse MODULE => qw(sub1 sub2 sub3)
+
+Defers C<require MODULE> until someone calls one of the specified
+subroutines (which must be exported by MODULE).  This pragma should be
+used with caution, and only when necessary.
+
+=item use blib
+
+=item use blib 'dir'
+
+Looks for MakeMaker-like I<'blib'> directory structure starting in
+I<dir> (or current directory) and working back up to five levels of
+parent directories.
+
+Intended for use on command line with B<-M> option as a way of testing
+arbitrary scripts against an uninstalled version of a package.
+
+=item use constant NAME => VALUE
+
+Provides a convenient interface for creating compile-time constants,
+See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions">.
+
+=item use locale
+
+Tells the compiler to enable (or disable) the use of POSIX locales for
+builtin operations.
+
+When C<use locale> is in effect, the current LC_CTYPE locale is used
+for regular expressions and case mapping; LC_COLLATE for string
+ordering; and LC_NUMERIC for numeric formating in printf and sprintf
+(but B<not> in print).  LC_NUMERIC is always used in write, since
+lexical scoping of formats is problematic at best.
+
+Each C<use locale> or C<no locale> affects statements to the end of
+the enclosing BLOCK or, if not inside a BLOCK, to the end of the
+current file.  Locales can be switched and queried with
+POSIX::setlocale().
+
+See L<perllocale> for more information.
+
+=item use ops
+
+Disable unsafe opcodes, or any named opcodes, when compiling Perl code.
+
+=item use vmsish
+
+Enable VMS-specific language features.  Currently, there are three
+VMS-specific features available: 'status', which makes C<$?> and
+C<system> return genuine VMS status values instead of emulating POSIX;
+'exit', which makes C<exit> take a genuine VMS status value instead of
+assuming that C<exit 1> is an error; and 'time', which makes all times
+relative to the local time zone, in the VMS tradition.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 Modules
+
+=head2 Required Updates
+
+Though Perl 5.004 is compatible with almost all modules that work
+with Perl 5.003, there are a few exceptions:
+
+    Module   Required Version for Perl 5.004
+    ------   -------------------------------
+    Filter   Filter-1.12
+    LWP      libwww-perl-5.08
+    Tk       Tk400.202 (-w makes noise)
+
+Also, the majordomo mailing list program, version 1.94.1, doesn't work
+with Perl 5.004 (nor with perl 4), because it executes an invalid
+regular expression.  This bug is fixed in majordomo version 1.94.2.
+
+=head2 Installation directories
+
+The I<installperl> script now places the Perl source files for
+extensions in the architecture-specific library directory, which is
+where the shared libraries for extensions have always been.  This
+change is intended to allow administrators to keep the Perl 5.004
+library directory unchanged from a previous version, without running
+the risk of binary incompatibility between extensions' Perl source and
+shared libraries.
+
+=head2 Module information summary
+
+Brand new modules, arranged by topic rather than strictly
+alphabetically:
+
+    CGI.pm               Web server interface ("Common Gateway Interface")
+    CGI/Apache.pm        Support for Apache's Perl module
+    CGI/Carp.pm          Log server errors with helpful context
+    CGI/Fast.pm          Support for FastCGI (persistent server process)
+    CGI/Push.pm          Support for server push
+    CGI/Switch.pm        Simple interface for multiple server types
+
+    CPAN                 Interface to Comprehensive Perl Archive Network
+    CPAN::FirstTime      Utility for creating CPAN configuration file
+    CPAN::Nox            Runs CPAN while avoiding compiled extensions
+
+    IO.pm                Top-level interface to IO::* classes
+    IO/File.pm           IO::File extension Perl module
+    IO/Handle.pm         IO::Handle extension Perl module
+    IO/Pipe.pm           IO::Pipe extension Perl module
+    IO/Seekable.pm       IO::Seekable extension Perl module
+    IO/Select.pm         IO::Select extension Perl module
+    IO/Socket.pm         IO::Socket extension Perl module
+
+    Opcode.pm            Disable named opcodes when compiling Perl code
+
+    ExtUtils/Embed.pm    Utilities for embedding Perl in C programs
+    ExtUtils/testlib.pm  Fixes up @INC to use just-built extension
+
+    FindBin.pm           Find path of currently executing program
+
+    Class/Struct.pm      Declare struct-like datatypes as Perl classes
+    File/stat.pm         By-name interface to Perl's builtin stat
+    Net/hostent.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin gethost*
+    Net/netent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getnet*
+    Net/protoent.pm      By-name interface to Perl's builtin getproto*
+    Net/servent.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin getserv*
+    Time/gmtime.pm       By-name interface to Perl's builtin gmtime
+    Time/localtime.pm    By-name interface to Perl's builtin localtime
+    Time/tm.pm           Internal object for Time::{gm,local}time
+    User/grent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getgr*
+    User/pwent.pm        By-name interface to Perl's builtin getpw*
+
+    Tie/RefHash.pm       Base class for tied hashes with references as keys
+
+    UNIVERSAL.pm         Base class for *ALL* classes
+
+=head2 Fcntl
+
+New constants in the existing Fcntl modules are now supported,
+provided that your operating system happens to support them:
+
+    F_GETOWN F_SETOWN
+    O_ASYNC O_DEFER O_DSYNC O_FSYNC O_SYNC
+    O_EXLOCK O_SHLOCK
+
+These constants are intended for use with the Perl operators sysopen()
+and fcntl() and the basic database modules like SDBM_File.  For the
+exact meaning of these and other Fcntl constants please refer to your
+operating system's documentation for fcntl() and open().
+
+In addition, the Fcntl module now provides these constants for use
+with the Perl operator flock():
+
+       LOCK_SH LOCK_EX LOCK_NB LOCK_UN
+
+These constants are defined in all environments (because where there is
+no flock() system call, Perl emulates it).  However, for historical
+reasons, these constants are not exported unless they are explicitly
+requested with the ":flock" tag (e.g. C<use Fcntl ':flock'>).
+
+=head2 IO
+
+The IO module provides a simple mechanism to load all of the IO modules at one
+go.  Currently this includes:
+
+     IO::Handle
+     IO::Seekable
+     IO::File
+     IO::Pipe
+     IO::Socket
+
+For more information on any of these modules, please see its
+respective documentation.
+
+=head2 Math::Complex
+
+The Math::Complex module has been totally rewritten, and now supports
+more operations.  These are overloaded:
+
+     + - * / ** <=> neg ~ abs sqrt exp log sin cos atan2 "" (stringify)
+
+And these functions are now exported:
+
+    pi i Re Im arg
+    log10 logn ln cbrt root
+    tan
+    csc sec cot
+    asin acos atan
+    acsc asec acot
+    sinh cosh tanh
+    csch sech coth
+    asinh acosh atanh
+    acsch asech acoth
+    cplx cplxe
+
+=head2 Math::Trig
+
+This new module provides a simpler interface to parts of Math::Complex for
+those who need trigonometric functions only for real numbers.
+
+=head2 DB_File
+
+There have been quite a few changes made to DB_File. Here are a few of
+the highlights:
+
+=over
+
+=item *
+
+Fixed a handful of bugs.
+
+=item *
+
+By public demand, added support for the standard hash function exists().
+
+=item *
+
+Made it compatible with Berkeley DB 1.86.
+
+=item *
+
+Made negative subscripts work with RECNO interface.
+
+=item *
+
+Changed the default flags from O_RDWR to O_CREAT|O_RDWR and the default
+mode from 0640 to 0666.
+
+=item *
+
+Made DB_File automatically import the open() constants (O_RDWR,
+O_CREAT etc.) from Fcntl, if available.
+
+=item *
+
+Updated documentation.
+
+=back
+
+Refer to the HISTORY section in DB_File.pm for a complete list of
+changes. Everything after DB_File 1.01 has been added since 5.003.
+
+=head2 Net::Ping
+
+Major rewrite - support added for both udp echo and real icmp pings.
+
+=head2 Object-oriented overrides for builtin operators
+
+Many of the Perl builtins returning lists now have
+object-oriented overrides.  These are:
+
+    File::stat
+    Net::hostent
+    Net::netent
+    Net::protoent
+    Net::servent
+    Time::gmtime
+    Time::localtime
+    User::grent
+    User::pwent
+
+For example, you can now say
+
+    use File::stat;
+    use User::pwent;
+    $his = (stat($filename)->st_uid == pwent($whoever)->pw_uid);
+
+=head1 Utility Changes
+
+=head2 pod2html
+
+=over
+
+=item Sends converted HTML to standard output
+
+The I<pod2html> utility included with Perl 5.004 is entirely new.
+By default, it sends the converted HTML to its standard output,
+instead of writing it to a file like Perl 5.003's I<pod2html> did.
+Use the B<--outfile=FILENAME> option to write to a file.
+
+=back
+
+=head2 xsubpp
+
+=over
+
+=item C<void> XSUBs now default to returning nothing
+
+Due to a documentation/implementation bug in previous versions of
+Perl, XSUBs with a return type of C<void> have actually been
+returning one value.  Usually that value was the GV for the XSUB,
+but sometimes it was some already freed or reused value, which would
+sometimes lead to program failure.
+
+In Perl 5.004, if an XSUB is declared as returning C<void>, it
+actually returns no value, i.e. an empty list (though there is a
+backward-compatibility exception; see below).  If your XSUB really
+does return an SV, you should give it a return type of C<SV *>.
+
+For backward compatibility, I<xsubpp> tries to guess whether a
+C<void> XSUB is really C<void> or if it wants to return an C<SV *>.
+It does so by examining the text of the XSUB: if I<xsubpp> finds
+what looks like an assignment to C<ST(0)>, it assumes that the
+XSUB's return type is really C<SV *>.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 C Language API Changes
+
+=over
+
+=item C<gv_fetchmethod> and C<perl_call_sv>
+
+The C<gv_fetchmethod> function finds a method for an object, just like
+in Perl 5.003.  The GV it returns may be a method cache entry.
+However, in Perl 5.004, method cache entries are not visible to users;
+therefore, they can no longer be passed directly to C<perl_call_sv>.
+Instead, you should use the C<GvCV> macro on the GV to extract its CV,
+and pass the CV to C<perl_call_sv>.
+
+The most likely symptom of passing the result of C<gv_fetchmethod> to
+C<perl_call_sv> is Perl's producing an "Undefined subroutine called"
+error on the I<second> call to a given method (since there is no cache
+on the first call).
+
+=item C<perl_eval_pv>
+
+A new function handy for eval'ing strings of Perl code inside C code.
+This function returns the value from the eval statement, which can
+be used instead of fetching globals from the symbol table.  See
+L<perlguts>, L<perlembed> and L<perlcall> for details and examples.
+
+=item Extended API for manipulating hashes
+
+Internal handling of hash keys has changed.  The old hashtable API is
+still fully supported, and will likely remain so.  The additions to the
+API allow passing keys as C<SV*>s, so that C<tied> hashes can be given
+real scalars as keys rather than plain strings (nontied hashes still
+can only use strings as keys).  New extensions must use the new hash
+access functions and macros if they wish to use C<SV*> keys.  These
+additions also make it feasible to manipulate C<HE*>s (hash entries),
+which can be more efficient.  See L<perlguts> for details.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 Documentation Changes
+
+Many of the base and library pods were updated.  These
+new pods are included in section 1:
+
+=over
+
+=item L<perldelta>
+
+This document.
+
+=item L<perlfaq>
+
+Frequently asked questions.
+
+=item L<perllocale>
+
+Locale support (internationalization and localization).
+
+=item L<perltoot>
+
+Tutorial on Perl OO programming.
+
+=item L<perlapio>
+
+Perl internal IO abstraction interface.
+
+=item L<perlmodlib>
+
+Perl module library and recommended practice for module creation.
+Extracted from L<perlmod> (which is much smaller as a result).
+
+=item L<perldebug>
+
+Although not new, this has been massively updated.
+
+=item L<perlsec>
+
+Although not new, this has been massively updated.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 New Diagnostics
+
+Several new conditions will trigger warnings that were
+silent before.  Some only affect certain platforms.
+The following new warnings and errors outline these.
+These messages are classified as follows (listed in
+increasing order of desperation):
+
+   (W) A warning (optional).
+   (D) A deprecation (optional).
+   (S) A severe warning (mandatory).
+   (F) A fatal error (trappable).
+   (P) An internal error you should never see (trappable).
+   (X) A very fatal error (nontrappable).
+   (A) An alien error message (not generated by Perl).
+
+=over
+
+=item "my" variable %s masks earlier declaration in same scope
+
+(W) A lexical variable has been redeclared in the same scope, effectively
+eliminating all access to the previous instance.  This is almost always
+a typographical error.  Note that the earlier variable will still exist
+until the end of the scope or until all closure referents to it are
+destroyed.
+
+=item %s argument is not a HASH element or slice
+
+(F) The argument to delete() must be either a hash element, such as
+
+    $foo{$bar}
+    $ref->[12]->{"susie"}
+
+or a hash slice, such as
+
+    @foo{$bar, $baz, $xyzzy}
+    @{$ref->[12]}{"susie", "queue"}
+
+=item Allocation too large: %lx
+
+(X) You can't allocate more than 64K on an MS-DOS machine.
+
+=item Allocation too large
+
+(F) You can't allocate more than 2^31+"small amount" bytes.
+
+=item Applying %s to %s will act on scalar(%s)
+
+(W) The pattern match (//), substitution (s///), and transliteration (tr///)
+operators work on scalar values.  If you apply one of them to an array
+or a hash, it will convert the array or hash to a scalar value -- the
+length of an array, or the population info of a hash -- and then work on
+that scalar value.  This is probably not what you meant to do.  See
+L<perlfunc/grep> and L<perlfunc/map> for alternatives.
+
+=item Attempt to free nonexistent shared string
+
+(P) Perl maintains a reference counted internal table of strings to
+optimize the storage and access of hash keys and other strings.  This
+indicates someone tried to decrement the reference count of a string
+that can no longer be found in the table.
+
+=item Attempt to use reference as lvalue in substr
+
+(W) You supplied a reference as the first argument to substr() used
+as an lvalue, which is pretty strange.  Perhaps you forgot to
+dereference it first.  See L<perlfunc/substr>.
+
+=item Bareword "%s" refers to nonexistent package
+
+(W) You used a qualified bareword of the form C<Foo::>, but
+the compiler saw no other uses of that namespace before that point.
+Perhaps you need to predeclare a package?
+
+=item Can't redefine active sort subroutine %s
+
+(F) Perl optimizes the internal handling of sort subroutines and keeps
+pointers into them.  You tried to redefine one such sort subroutine when it
+was currently active, which is not allowed.  If you really want to do
+this, you should write C<sort { &func } @x> instead of C<sort func @x>.
+
+=item Can't use bareword ("%s") as %s ref while "strict refs" in use
+
+(F) Only hard references are allowed by "strict refs".  Symbolic references
+are disallowed.  See L<perlref>.
+
+=item Cannot resolve method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
+
+(P) Internal error trying to resolve overloading specified by a method
+name (as opposed to a subroutine reference).
+
+=item Constant subroutine %s redefined
+
+(S) You redefined a subroutine which had previously been eligible for
+inlining.  See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for commentary and
+workarounds.
+
+=item Constant subroutine %s undefined
+
+(S) You undefined a subroutine which had previously been eligible for
+inlining.  See L<perlsub/"Constant Functions"> for commentary and
+workarounds.
+
+=item Copy method did not return a reference
+
+(F) The method which overloads "=" is buggy. See L<overload/Copy Constructor>.
+
+=item Died
+
+(F) You passed die() an empty string (the equivalent of C<die "">) or
+you called it with no args and both C<$@> and C<$_> were empty.
+
+=item Exiting pseudo-block via %s
+
+(W) You are exiting a rather special block construct (like a sort block or
+subroutine) by unconventional means, such as a goto, or a loop control
+statement.  See L<perlfunc/sort>.
+
+=item Identifier too long
+
+(F) Perl limits identifiers (names for variables, functions, etc.) to
+252 characters for simple names, somewhat more for compound names (like
+C<$A::B>).  You've exceeded Perl's limits.  Future versions of Perl are
+likely to eliminate these arbitrary limitations.
+
+=item Illegal character %s (carriage return)
+
+(F) A carriage return character was found in the input.  This is an
+error, and not a warning, because carriage return characters can break
+multi-line strings, including here documents (e.g., C<print E<lt>E<lt>EOF;>).
+
+=item Illegal switch in PERL5OPT: %s
+
+(X) The PERL5OPT environment variable may only be used to set the
+following switches: B<-[DIMUdmw]>.
+
+=item Integer overflow in hex number
+
+(S) The literal hex number you have specified is too big for your
+architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest hex literal is
+0xFFFFFFFF.
+
+=item Integer overflow in octal number
+
+(S) The literal octal number you have specified is too big for your
+architecture. On a 32-bit architecture the largest octal literal is
+037777777777.
+
+=item internal error: glob failed
+
+(P) Something went wrong with the external program(s) used for C<glob>
+and C<E<lt>*.cE<gt>>.  This may mean that your csh (C shell) is
+broken.  If so, you should change all of the csh-related variables in
+config.sh:  If you have tcsh, make the variables refer to it as if it
+were csh (e.g. C<full_csh='/usr/bin/tcsh'>); otherwise, make them all
+empty (except that C<d_csh> should be C<'undef'>) so that Perl will
+think csh is missing.  In either case, after editing config.sh, run
+C<./Configure -S> and rebuild Perl.
+
+=item Invalid conversion in %s: "%s"
+
+(W) Perl does not understand the given format conversion.
+See L<perlfunc/sprintf>.
+
+=item Invalid type in pack: '%s'
+
+(F) The given character is not a valid pack type.  See L<perlfunc/pack>.
+
+=item Invalid type in unpack: '%s'
+
+(F) The given character is not a valid unpack type.  See L<perlfunc/unpack>.
+
+=item Name "%s::%s" used only once: possible typo
+
+(W) Typographical errors often show up as unique variable names.
+If you had a good reason for having a unique name, then just mention
+it again somehow to suppress the message (the C<use vars> pragma is
+provided for just this purpose).
+
+=item Null picture in formline
+
+(F) The first argument to formline must be a valid format picture
+specification.  It was found to be empty, which probably means you
+supplied it an uninitialized value.  See L<perlform>.
+
+=item Offset outside string
+
+(F) You tried to do a read/write/send/recv operation with an offset
+pointing outside the buffer.  This is difficult to imagine.
+The sole exception to this is that C<sysread()>ing past the buffer
+will extend the buffer and zero pad the new area.
+
+=item Out of memory!
+
+(X|F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
+remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request.
+
+The request was judged to be small, so the possibility to trap it
+depends on the way Perl was compiled.  By default it is not trappable.
+However, if compiled for this, Perl may use the contents of C<$^M> as
+an emergency pool after die()ing with this message.  In this case the
+error is trappable I<once>.
+
+=item Out of memory during request for %s
+
+(F) The malloc() function returned 0, indicating there was insufficient
+remaining memory (or virtual memory) to satisfy the request. However,
+the request was judged large enough (compile-time default is 64K), so
+a possibility to shut down by trapping this error is granted.
+
+=item panic: frexp
+
+(P) The library function frexp() failed, making printf("%f") impossible.
+
+=item Possible attempt to put comments in qw() list
+
+(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; as with literal
+strings, comment characters are not ignored, but are instead treated
+as literal data.  (You may have used different delimiters than the
+exclamation marks parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
+used.)
+
+You probably wrote something like this:
+
+    @list = qw(
+        a # a comment
+        b # another comment
+    );
+
+when you should have written this:
+
+    @list = qw(
+        a
+        b
+    );
+
+If you really want comments, build your list the
+old-fashioned way, with quotes and commas:
+
+    @list = (
+        'a',    # a comment
+        'b',    # another comment
+    );
+
+=item Possible attempt to separate words with commas
+
+(W) qw() lists contain items separated by whitespace; therefore commas
+aren't needed to separate the items. (You may have used different
+delimiters than the parentheses shown here; braces are also frequently
+used.)
+
+You probably wrote something like this:
+
+    qw! a, b, c !;
+
+which puts literal commas into some of the list items.  Write it without
+commas if you don't want them to appear in your data:
+
+    qw! a b c !;
+
+=item Scalar value @%s{%s} better written as $%s{%s}
+
+(W) You've used a hash slice (indicated by @) to select a single element of
+a hash.  Generally it's better to ask for a scalar value (indicated by $).
+The difference is that C<$foo{&bar}> always behaves like a scalar, both when
+assigning to it and when evaluating its argument, while C<@foo{&bar}> behaves
+like a list when you assign to it, and provides a list context to its
+subscript, which can do weird things if you're expecting only one subscript.
+
+=item Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
+
+(P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importing stubs.
+Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to C<can>
+may break this.
+
+=item Too late for "B<-T>" option
+
+(X) The #! line (or local equivalent) in a Perl script contains the
+B<-T> option, but Perl was not invoked with B<-T> in its argument
+list.  This is an error because, by the time Perl discovers a B<-T> in
+a script, it's too late to properly taint everything from the
+environment.  So Perl gives up.
+
+=item untie attempted while %d inner references still exist
+
+(W) A copy of the object returned from C<tie> (or C<tied>) was still
+valid when C<untie> was called.
+
+=item Unrecognized character %s
+
+(F) The Perl parser has no idea what to do with the specified character
+in your Perl script (or eval).  Perhaps you tried to run a compressed
+script, a binary program, or a directory as a Perl program.
+
+=item Unsupported function fork
+
+(F) Your version of executable does not support forking.
+
+Note that under some systems, like OS/2, there may be different flavors of
+Perl executables, some of which may support fork, some not. Try changing
+the name you call Perl by to C<perl_>, C<perl__>, and so on.
+
+=item Use of "$$<digit>" to mean "${$}<digit>" is deprecated
+
+(D) Perl versions before 5.004 misinterpreted any type marker followed
+by "$" and a digit.  For example, "$$0" was incorrectly taken to mean
+"${$}0" instead of "${$0}".  This bug is (mostly) fixed in Perl 5.004.
+
+However, the developers of Perl 5.004 could not fix this bug completely,
+because at least two widely-used modules depend on the old meaning of
+"$$0" in a string.  So Perl 5.004 still interprets "$$<digit>" in the
+old (broken) way inside strings; but it generates this message as a
+warning.  And in Perl 5.005, this special treatment will cease.
+
+=item Value of %s can be "0"; test with defined()
+
+(W) In a conditional expression, you used <HANDLE>, <*> (glob), C<each()>,
+or C<readdir()> as a boolean value.  Each of these constructs can return a
+value of "0"; that would make the conditional expression false, which is
+probably not what you intended.  When using these constructs in conditional
+expressions, test their values with the C<defined> operator.
+
+=item Variable "%s" may be unavailable
+
+(W) An inner (nested) I<anonymous> subroutine is inside a I<named>
+subroutine, and outside that is another subroutine; and the anonymous
+(innermost) subroutine is referencing a lexical variable defined in
+the outermost subroutine.  For example:
+
+   sub outermost { my $a; sub middle { sub { $a } } }
+
+If the anonymous subroutine is called or referenced (directly or
+indirectly) from the outermost subroutine, it will share the variable
+as you would expect.  But if the anonymous subroutine is called or
+referenced when the outermost subroutine is not active, it will see
+the value of the shared variable as it was before and during the
+*first* call to the outermost subroutine, which is probably not what
+you want.
+
+In these circumstances, it is usually best to make the middle
+subroutine anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  Perl has specific
+support for shared variables in nested anonymous subroutines; a named
+subroutine in between interferes with this feature.
+
+=item Variable "%s" will not stay shared
+
+(W) An inner (nested) I<named> subroutine is referencing a lexical
+variable defined in an outer subroutine.
+
+When the inner subroutine is called, it will probably see the value of
+the outer subroutine's variable as it was before and during the
+*first* call to the outer subroutine; in this case, after the first
+call to the outer subroutine is complete, the inner and outer
+subroutines will no longer share a common value for the variable.  In
+other words, the variable will no longer be shared.
+
+Furthermore, if the outer subroutine is anonymous and references a
+lexical variable outside itself, then the outer and inner subroutines
+will I<never> share the given variable.
+
+This problem can usually be solved by making the inner subroutine
+anonymous, using the C<sub {}> syntax.  When inner anonymous subs that
+reference variables in outer subroutines are called or referenced,
+they are automatically rebound to the current values of such
+variables.
+
+=item Warning: something's wrong
+
+(W) You passed warn() an empty string (the equivalent of C<warn "">) or
+you called it with no args and C<$_> was empty.
+
+=item Ill-formed logical name |%s| in prime_env_iter
+
+(W) A warning peculiar to VMS.  A logical name was encountered when preparing
+to iterate over %ENV which violates the syntactic rules governing logical
+names.  Since it cannot be translated normally, it is skipped, and will not
+appear in %ENV.  This may be a benign occurrence, as some software packages
+might directly modify logical name tables and introduce nonstandard names,
+or it may indicate that a logical name table has been corrupted.
+
+=item Got an error from DosAllocMem
+
+(P) An error peculiar to OS/2.  Most probably you're using an obsolete
+version of Perl, and this should not happen anyway.
+
+=item Malformed PERLLIB_PREFIX
+
+(F) An error peculiar to OS/2.  PERLLIB_PREFIX should be of the form
+
+    prefix1;prefix2
+
+or
+
+    prefix1 prefix2
+
+with nonempty prefix1 and prefix2.  If C<prefix1> is indeed a prefix
+of a builtin library search path, prefix2 is substituted.  The error
+may appear if components are not found, or are too long.  See
+"PERLLIB_PREFIX" in F<README.os2>.
+
+=item PERL_SH_DIR too long
+
+(F) An error peculiar to OS/2. PERL_SH_DIR is the directory to find the
+C<sh>-shell in.  See "PERL_SH_DIR" in F<README.os2>.
+
+=item Process terminated by SIG%s
+
+(W) This is a standard message issued by OS/2 applications, while *nix
+applications die in silence.  It is considered a feature of the OS/2
+port.  One can easily disable this by appropriate sighandlers, see
+L<perlipc/"Signals">.  See also "Process terminated by SIGTERM/SIGINT"
+in F<README.os2>.
+
+=back
+
+=head1 BUGS
+
+If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the headers of
+recently posted articles in the comp.lang.perl.misc newsgroup.
+There may also be information at http://www.perl.com/perl/, the Perl
+Home Page.
+
+If you believe you have an unreported bug, please run the B<perlbug>
+program included with your release.  Make sure you trim your bug down
+to a tiny but sufficient test case.  Your bug report, along with the
+output of C<perl -V>, will be sent off to <F<perlbug@perl.com>> to be
+analysed by the Perl porting team.
+
+=head1 SEE ALSO
+
+The F<Changes> file for exhaustive details on what changed.
+
+The F<INSTALL> file for how to build Perl.  This file has been
+significantly updated for 5.004, so even veteran users should
+look through it.
+
+The F<README> file for general stuff.
+
+The F<Copying> file for copyright information.
+
+=head1 HISTORY
+
+Constructed by Tom Christiansen, grabbing material with permission
+from innumerable contributors, with kibitzing by more than a few Perl
+porters.
+
+Last update: Wed May 14 11:14:09 EDT 1997
index 92dbc2a..1a5e0e6 100644 (file)
@@ -1452,7 +1452,7 @@ system library.  Within a list context, the return values from the
 various get routines are as follows:
 
     ($name,$passwd,$uid,$gid,
-       $quota,$comment,$gcos,$dir,$shell) = getpw*
+       $quota,$comment,$gcos,$dir,$shell,$expire) = getpw*
     ($name,$passwd,$gid,$members) = getgr*
     ($name,$aliases,$addrtype,$length,@addrs) = gethost*
     ($name,$aliases,$addrtype,$net) = getnet*
@@ -1473,6 +1473,22 @@ lookup by name, in which case you get the other thing, whatever it is.
     $name = getgrent
     etc.
 
+In I<getpw*()> the fields $quota, $comment, and $expire are special
+cases in the sense that in many systems they are unsupported.  If the
+$quota is unsupported, it is an empty scalar.  If it is supported, it
+usually encodes the disk quota.  If the $comment field is unsupported,
+it is an empty scalar.  If it is supported it usually encodes some
+administrative comment about the user.  In some systems the $quota
+field may be $change or $age, fields that have to do with password
+aging.  In some systems the $comment field may be $class.  The $expire
+field, if present, encodes the expiration period of the account or the
+password.  For the availability and the exact meaning of these fields
+in your system, please consult your getpwnam(3) documentation and your
+<pwd.h> file.  You can also find out from within Perl which meaning
+your $quota and $comment fields have and whether you have the $expire
+field by using the Config module and the values d_pwquota, d_pwage,
+d_pwchange, d_pwcomment, and d_pwexpire.
+
 The $members value returned by I<getgr*()> is a space separated list of
 the login names of the members of the group.
 
index 16babd2..c66bcb6 100644 (file)
@@ -504,6 +504,45 @@ like this:
     }
     [..normal %ENV behavior here..]
 
+It's also worth taking a moment to explain what happens when you
+localize a member of a composite type (i.e. an array or hash element).
+In this case, the element is localized I<by name>. This means that
+when the scope of the C<local()> ends, the saved value will be
+restored to the hash element whose key was named in the C<local()>, or
+the array element whose index was named in the C<local()>.  If that
+element was deleted while the C<local()> was in effect (e.g. by a
+C<delete()> from a hash or a C<shift()> of an array), it will spring
+back into existence, possibly extending an array and filling in the
+skipped elements with C<undef>.  For instance, if you say
+
+    %hash = ( 'This' => 'is', 'a' => 'test' );
+    @ary  = ( 0..5 );
+    {
+         local($ary[5]) = 6;
+         local($hash{'a'}) = 'drill';
+         while (my $e = pop(@ary)) {
+             print "$e . . .\n";
+             last unless $e > 3;
+         }
+         if (@ary) {
+             $hash{'only a'} = 'test';
+             delete $hash{'a'};
+         }
+    }
+    print join(' ', map { "$_ $hash{$_}" } sort keys %hash),".\n";
+    print "The array has ",scalar(@ary)," elements: ",
+          join(', ', map { defined $_ ? $_ : 'undef' } @ary),"\n";
+
+Perl will print
+
+    6 . . .
+    4 . . .
+    3 . . .
+    This is a test only a test.
+    The array has 6 elements: 0, 1, 2, undef, undef, 5
+
+In short, be careful when manipulating the containers for composite types
+whose elements have been localized.
 
 =head2 Passing Symbol Table Entries (typeglobs)
 
index ebaa3b2..1d0f5d6 100644 (file)
@@ -409,6 +409,18 @@ or
        $nothing = 1;
     }
 
+or, using experimental C<EVAL blocks> of regular expressions
+(see L<perlre/"(?{ code })">),
+
+       / ^abc (?{ $abc = 1 })
+         |
+         ^def (?{  $def = 1 })
+        |
+         ^xyz (?{ $xyz = 1 })
+        |
+         (?{ $nothing = 1 })
+       /x;
+
 or even, horrors,
 
     if (/^abc/)
diff --git a/pp.c b/pp.c
index f6487ac..fafc606 100644 (file)
--- a/pp.c
+++ b/pp.c
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ typedef unsigned UBW;
  * have an integral type (except char) small enough to be represented
  * in a double without loss; that is, it has no 32-bit type.
  */
-#if BYTEORDER > 0xFFFF && defined(_CRAY) && !defined(_CRAYMPP)
+#if LONGSIZE > 4  && defined(_CRAY) && !defined(_CRAYMPP)
 #  define BW_BITS  32
 #  define BW_MASK  ((1 << BW_BITS) - 1)
 #  define BW_SIGN  (1 << (BW_BITS - 1))
index be1ce49..2fba24a 100644 (file)
--- a/pp_hot.c
+++ b/pp_hot.c
@@ -1997,8 +1997,9 @@ PP(pp_entersub)
         * (3) instead of (2) so we'd have to clone. Would the fact
         * that we released the mutex more quickly make up for this?
         */
-       svp = hv_fetch(thr->cvcache, (char *)cv, sizeof(cv), FALSE);
-       if (svp) {
+       if (threadnum &&
+           (svp = hv_fetch(thr->cvcache, (char *)cv, sizeof(cv), FALSE)))
+       {
            /* We already have a clone to use */
            MUTEX_UNLOCK(CvMUTEXP(cv));
            cv = *(CV**)svp;
index d841d04..219e3b0 100644 (file)
--- a/pp_sys.c
+++ b/pp_sys.c
@@ -4101,41 +4101,55 @@ PP(pp_gpwent)
     if (pwent) {
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_name);
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_passwd);
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setiv(sv, (IV)pwent->pw_uid);
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setiv(sv, (IV)pwent->pw_gid);
+
+       /* pw_change, pw_quota, and pw_age are mutually exclusive. */
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
 #ifdef PWCHANGE
        sv_setiv(sv, (IV)pwent->pw_change);
 #else
-#ifdef PWQUOTA
+#   ifdef PWQUOTA
        sv_setiv(sv, (IV)pwent->pw_quota);
-#else
-#ifdef PWAGE
+#   else
+#       ifdef PWAGE
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_age);
+#       endif
+#   endif
 #endif
-#endif
-#endif
+
+       /* pw_class and pw_comment are mutually exclusive. */
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
 #ifdef PWCLASS
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_class);
 #else
-#ifdef PWCOMMENT
+#   ifdef PWCOMMENT
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_comment);
+#   endif
 #endif
-#endif
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
+#ifdef PWGECOS
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_gecos);
+#endif
 #ifndef INCOMPLETE_TAINTS
+       /* pw_gecos is tainted. */
        SvTAINTED_on(sv);
 #endif
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_dir);
+
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setpv(sv, pwent->pw_shell);
+
 #ifdef PWEXPIRE
        PUSHs(sv = sv_mortalcopy(&sv_no));
        sv_setiv(sv, (IV)pwent->pw_expire);
diff --git a/proto.h b/proto.h
index fb20480..03c91d3 100644 (file)
--- a/proto.h
+++ b/proto.h
@@ -335,11 +335,7 @@ SV*        newRV _((SV* ref));
 #if !defined(__GNUC__) && (defined(CRIPPLED_CC) || defined(USE_THREADS))
 SV*    newRV_noinc _((SV *));
 #endif
-#ifdef LEAKTEST
-SV*    newSV _((I32 x, STRLEN len));
-#else
 SV*    newSV _((STRLEN len));
-#endif
 OP*    newSVREF _((OP* o));
 OP*    newSVOP _((I32 type, I32 flags, SV* sv));
 SV*    newSViv _((IV i));
diff --git a/sv.c b/sv.c
index b5e408c..8d8d614 100644 (file)
--- a/sv.c
+++ b/sv.c
@@ -2429,11 +2429,7 @@ sv_catpv_mg(register SV *sv, register char *ptr)
 }
 
 SV *
-#ifdef LEAKTEST
-newSV(I32 x, STRLEN len)
-#else
 newSV(STRLEN len)
-#endif
 {
     register SV *sv;
     
diff --git a/sv.h b/sv.h
index 0b3adea..6b4a125 100644 (file)
--- a/sv.h
+++ b/sv.h
@@ -199,6 +199,7 @@ struct xpvnv {
     double     xnv_nv;         /* numeric value, if any */
 };
 
+/* These structure must match the beginning of struct xpvhv in hv.h. */
 struct xpvmg {
     char *     xpv_pv;         /* pointer to malloced string */
     STRLEN     xpv_cur;        /* length of xpv_pv as a C string */
diff --git a/t/TEST b/t/TEST
index a684b2a..81d5650 100755 (executable)
--- a/t/TEST
+++ b/t/TEST
@@ -38,12 +38,34 @@ else {
     close(CONFIG);
 }
 
-$bad = 0;
-$good = 0;
-$total = @ARGV;
-$files  = 0;
-$totmax = 0;
-while ($test = shift) {
+%infinite = ( 'comp/require.t', 1, 'op/bop.t', 1, 'lib/hostname.t', 1 ); 
+
+_testprogs('perl', @ARGV);
+_testprogs('compile', @ARGV) if (-e "../testcompile"); 
+
+sub _testprogs
+{
+       $type = shift @_;
+       @tests = @_;
+
+
+       print "
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+TESTING COMPILER
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+" if ($type eq 'compile');
+
+       $bad = 0;
+       $good = 0;
+       $total = @tests;
+       $files  = 0;
+       $totmax = 0;
+while ($test = shift @tests) {
+
+    if ( $infinite{$test} && $type eq 'compile' ) {
+               print STDERR "$test creates infinite loop! Skipping.\n"; 
+        next;
+       }
     if ($test =~ /^$/) {
        next;
     }
@@ -52,7 +74,14 @@ while ($test = shift) {
     print "$te" . '.' x (18 - length($te));
     if ($sharpbang) {
        -x $test || (print "isn't executable.\n");
-       open(RESULTS,"./$test |") || (print "can't run.\n");
+
+       if ($type eq 'perl')
+               { open(RESULTS, "./$test |") || (print "can't run.\n"); }
+       else
+       { 
+               open(RESULTS, "./perl -I../lib ../utils/perlcc ./$test -run -verbose dcf -log ../compilelog |") 
+                                                                                       || (print "can't compile.\n");
+       }
     } else {
        open(SCRIPT,"$test") || die "Can't run $test.\n";
        $_ = <SCRIPT>;
@@ -66,7 +95,16 @@ while ($test = shift) {
        } else {
            $switch = '';
        }
-       open(RESULTS,"./perl$switch $test |") || (print "can't run.\n");
+
+       if ($type eq 'perl')
+       {
+               open(RESULTS,"./perl$switch $test |") || (print "can't run.\n");
+       }
+       else
+       {
+               open(RESULTS, "./perl -I../lib ../utils/perlcc ./$test -run -verbose dcf -log ../compilelog |") 
+                                                                                       || (print "can't compile.\n");
+       }
     }
     $ok = 0;
     $next = 0;
@@ -129,16 +167,21 @@ if ($bad == 0) {
    ### Since not all tests were successful, you may want to run some
    ### of them individually and examine any diagnostic messages they
    ### produce.  See the INSTALL document's section on "make test".
+   ### If you are testing the compiler, then ignore this message 
+   ### and run 
+   ###      ./perl harness
+   ### in the directory ./t.
 SHRDLU
        warn <<'SHRDLU' if $good / $total > 0.8;
    ###
    ### Since most tests were successful, you have a good chance to
    ### get information with better granularity by running
-   ###     ./perl harness
+   ###     ./perl harness 
    ### in directory ./t.
 SHRDLU
 }
 ($user,$sys,$cuser,$csys) = times;
 print sprintf("u=%g  s=%g  cu=%g  cs=%g  scripts=%d  tests=%d\n",
     $user,$sys,$cuser,$csys,$files,$totmax);
+}
 exit ($bad != 0);
index af92a8b..f6d94de 100644 (file)
--- a/t/harness
+++ b/t/harness
@@ -17,4 +17,17 @@ $Test::Harness::verbose = shift if @ARGV && $ARGV[0] eq '-v';
 
 @tests = @ARGV;
 @tests = <base/*.t comp/*.t cmd/*.t io/*.t op/*.t pragma/*.t lib/*.t> unless @tests;
+
 Test::Harness::runtests @tests;
+
+%infinite = ('comp/require.t', 1, 'op/bop.t', 1, 'lib/hostname.t', 1 );
+
+@tests = grep (!$infinite{$_}, @tests);
+
+if (-e "../testcompile") 
+{ 
+       print "The tests ", join(' ', keys(%infinite)), 
+                                                       " generate infinite loops! Skipping!\n";
+
+       $ENV{'COMPILE_TEST'} = 1; Test::Harness::runtests @tests; 
+}
index efeda80..0387e55 100755 (executable)
@@ -74,10 +74,11 @@ if ($^O eq 'VMS') {
     exit;
 }
 
-if ($Config{d_sfio} || $^O eq machten) {
+if ($Config{d_sfio} || $^O eq machten || $^O eq beos) {
     # Sfio doesn't report failure when closing a broken pipe
     # that has pending output.  Go figure.  MachTen doesn't either,
     # but won't write to broken pipes, so nothing's pending at close.
+    # BeOS will not write to broken pipes, either.
     print "ok 9\n";
 }
 else {
index 3ab609c..0391b7b 100755 (executable)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ use Fcntl;
 
 print "1..12\n";
 
-unlink <Op_dbmx.*>;
+unlink <Op_dbmx*>;
 
 umask(0);
 print (tie(%h,AnyDBM_File,'Op_dbmx', O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640)
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ print (tie(%h,AnyDBM_File,'Op_dbmx', O_RDWR|O_CREAT, 0640)
 
 $Dfile = "Op_dbmx.pag";
 if (! -e $Dfile) {
-       ($Dfile) = <Op_dbmx.*>;
+       ($Dfile) = <Op_dbmx*>;
 }
 if ($^O eq 'amigaos' || $^O eq 'os2' || $^O eq 'MSWin32' || $^O eq 'dos') {
     print "ok 2 # Skipped: different file permission semantics\n";
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ else {
 while (($key,$value) = each(%h)) {
     $i++;
 }
-print (!$i ? "ok 3\n" : "not ok 3\n");
+print (!$i ? "ok 3\n" : "not ok 3 # i=$i\n\n");
 
 $h{'goner1'} = 'snork';
 
index 812f1bf..7c40481 100644 (file)
--- a/thrdvar.h
+++ b/thrdvar.h
@@ -1,4 +1,10 @@
-/* Per-thread variables */
+/* Don't forget to re-run embed.pl to propagate changes! */
+
+/* Per-thread variables
+   The 'T' prefix is only needed for vars that need appropriate #defines
+generated when built with or without USE_THREADS.  (It is also used
+to generate the appropriate the export list for win32.) */
+
 /* Important ones in the first cache line (if alignment is done right) */
 
 PERLVAR(Tstack_sp,     SV **)          
@@ -78,10 +84,14 @@ PERLVAR(Tstart_env, JMPENV)                 /* empty startup sigjmp() environment */
 PERLVAR(Tav_fetch_sv,  SV *)
 PERLVAR(Thv_fetch_sv,  SV *)
 PERLVAR(Thv_fetch_ent_mh, HE)
+PERLVAR(Tmodcount, I32)
 
 /* XXX Sort stuff, firstgv secongv and so on? */
 /* XXX What about regexp stuff? */
 
+/* Note that the variables below are all explicitly referenced in the code
+as thr->whatever and therefore don't need the 'T' prefix. */
+
 #ifdef USE_THREADS
 
 PERLVAR(oursv,         SV *)           
index a252285..6141cf3 100644 (file)
--- a/thread.h
+++ b/thread.h
 #endif
 
 #ifndef YIELD
-#  ifdef HAS_PTHREAD_YIELD
-#    define YIELD pthread_yield()
-#  else
+#  ifdef HAS_SCHED_YIELD
 #    define YIELD sched_yield()
+#  else
+#    ifdef HAS_PTHREAD_YIELD
+#      define YIELD pthread_yield()
+#    endif
 #  endif
 #endif
 
index 3c343c8..2df16d8 100644 (file)
@@ -1,13 +1,18 @@
 
 PERL = ../miniperl
+REALPERL = ../perl
 
 # Files to be built with variable substitution after miniperl is
 # available.  Dependencies handled manually below (for now).
 
-pl = c2ph.PL h2ph.PL h2xs.PL perlbug.PL perldoc.PL pl2pm.PL splain.PL
-plextract  = c2ph h2ph h2xs perlbug perldoc pl2pm splain
+pl = c2ph.PL h2ph.PL h2xs.PL perlbug.PL perldoc.PL pl2pm.PL splain.PL perlcc.PL
+plextract  = c2ph h2ph h2xs perlbug perldoc pl2pm splain perlcc
+plextractexe  = c2ph.exe h2ph.exe h2xs.exe perlbug.exe perldoc.exe pl2pm.exe splain.exe perlcc.exe
 
-all: $(plextract)
+all: $(plextract) 
+
+compile: all
+       $(REALPERL) -I../lib perlcc -regex 's/$$/.exe/' $(plextract) -prog -verbose dcf -log ../compilelog;
 
 $(plextract):
        $(PERL) -I../lib $@.PL
@@ -26,10 +31,12 @@ pl2pm:              pl2pm.PL ../config.sh
 
 splain:                splain.PL ../config.sh ../lib/diagnostics.pm
 
+perlcc:     perlcc.PL ../config.sh
+
 clean:
 
 realclean:
-       rm -rf $(plextract) pstruct
+       rm -rf $(plextract) pstruct $(plextractexe)
 
 clobber:       realclean
 
index 5c17e97..dc2207c 100644 (file)
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ while (defined ($file = next_file())) {
                        }
                    }
                    else {
-                      print OUT "unless defined(\&$name) {\nsub $name $proto\{\n    ${args}eval \"$new\";\n}\n}\n";
+                      print OUT "unless (defined(\&$name)) {\nsub $name $proto\{\n    ${args}eval \"$new\";\n}\n}\n";
                    }
                    %curargs = ();
                }
diff --git a/utils/perlcc.PL b/utils/perlcc.PL
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..af7488f
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,935 @@
+#!/usr/local/bin/perl
+use Config;
+use File::Basename qw(&basename &dirname);
+# List explicitly here the variables you want Configure to
+# generate.  Metaconfig only looks for shell variables, so you
+# have to mention them as if they were shell variables, not
+# %Config entries.  Thus you write
+#  $startperl
+# to ensure Configure will look for $Config{startperl}.
+# Wanted:  $archlibexp
+# This forces PL files to create target in same directory as PL file.
+# This is so that make depend always knows where to find PL derivatives.
+chdir dirname($0);
+$file = basename($0, '.PL');
+$file .= '.com' if $^O eq 'VMS';
+open OUT,">$file" or die "Can't create $file: $!";
+print "Extracting $file (with variable substitutions)\n";
+# In this section, perl variables will be expanded during extraction.
+# You can use $Config{...} to use Configure variables.
+print OUT <<"!GROK!THIS!";
+$Config{startperl}
+    eval 'exec $Config{perlpath} -S \$0 \${1+"\$@"}'
+    if \$running_under_some_shell;
+!GROK!THIS!
+# In the following, perl variables are not expanded during extraction.
+print OUT <<'!NO!SUBS!';
+
+use Config;
+use strict;
+use FileHandle;
+use File::Basename qw(&basename &dirname);
+
+use Getopt::Long;
+
+$Getopt::Long::bundling_override = 1;
+$Getopt::Long::passthrough = 0;
+$Getopt::Long::ignore_case = 0;
+
+my $options = {};
+my $_fh;
+
+main();
+
+sub main
+{
+
+    GetOptions
+            (
+            $options,   "L:s",
+                        "I:s",
+                        "C:s",
+                        "o:s",
+                        "e:s",
+                        "regex:s",
+                        "verbose:s",
+                        "log:s",
+                                               "argv:s",
+                        "gen",
+                        "sav",
+                        "run",
+                        "prog",
+                        "mod"
+            );
+
+
+    my $key;
+
+    local($") = "|";
+
+    _usage() if (!_checkopts());
+    push(@ARGV, _maketempfile()) if ($options->{'e'});
+
+    _usage() if (!@ARGV);
+                
+    my $file;
+    foreach $file (@ARGV)
+    {
+        _print("
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+Compiling $file:
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
+", 36 );
+        _doit($file);
+    }
+}
+        
+sub _doit
+{
+    my ($file) = @_;
+
+    my ($program_ext, $module_ext) = _getRegexps();
+    my ($obj, $objfile, $so, $type);
+
+    if  (
+            (($file =~ m"@$program_ext") && ($file !~ m"@$module_ext"))
+            || (defined($options->{'prog'}) || defined($options->{'run'}))
+        )
+    {
+        $objfile = ($options->{'C'}) ?     $options->{'C'} : "$file.c";
+        $type = 'program';
+
+        $obj =         ($options->{'o'})?     $options->{'o'} : 
+                                            _getExecutable( $file,$program_ext);
+
+        return() if (!$obj);
+
+    }
+    elsif (($file =~ m"@$module_ext") || ($options->{'mod'}))
+    {
+        die "Shared objects are not supported on Win32 yet!!!!\n"
+                                      if ($Config{'osname'} eq 'MSWin32');
+
+        $obj =         ($options->{'o'})?    $options->{'o'} :
+                                            _getExecutable($file, $module_ext);
+        $so = "$obj.so";
+        $type = 'sharedlib';
+        return() if (!$obj);
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        _error("noextension", $file, $program_ext, $module_ext);
+        return();
+    }
+
+    if ($type eq 'program')
+    {
+        _print("Making C($objfile) for $file!\n", 36 );
+
+        my $errcode = _createCode($objfile, $file);
+        (_print( "ERROR: In generating code for $file!\n", -1), return()) 
+                                                                if ($errcode);
+
+        _print("Compiling C($obj) for $file!\n", 36 ) if (!$options->{'gen'});
+        my $errcode = _compileCode($file, $objfile, $obj) 
+                                            if (!$options->{'gen'});
+
+        if ($errcode)
+               {
+                       _print( "ERROR: In compiling code for $objfile !\n", -1);
+                       my $ofile = File::Basename::basename($objfile);
+                       $ofile =~ s"\.c$"\.o"s;
+                       
+                       _removeCode("$ofile"); 
+                       return()
+               }
+    
+        _runCode($obj) if ($options->{'run'});
+
+        _removeCode($objfile) if (!$options->{'sav'} || 
+                                    ($options->{'e'} && !$options->{'C'}));
+
+        _removeCode($file) if ($options->{'e'}); 
+
+        _removeCode($obj) if (($options->{'e'} && 
+                                ((!$options->{'sav'}) || !$options->{'o'})) || 
+                                ($options->{'run'} && (!$options->{'sav'})));
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        _print( "Making C($objfile) for $file!\n", 36 );
+        my $errcode = _createCode($objfile, $file, $obj);
+        (_print( "ERROR: In generating code for $file!\n", -1), return()) 
+                                                                if ($errcode);
+    
+        _print( "Compiling C($obj) for $file!\n", 36 ) if (!$options->{'gen'});
+
+        my $errorcode = 
+            _compileCode($file, $objfile, $obj, $so ) if (!$options->{'gen'});
+
+        (_print( "ERROR: In compiling code for $objfile!\n", -1), return()) 
+                                                                if ($errcode);
+    }
+}
+
+sub _getExecutable
+{
+    my ($sourceprog, $ext) = @_;
+    my ($obj);
+
+    if (defined($options->{'regex'}))
+    {
+        eval("(\$obj = \$sourceprog) =~ $options->{'regex'}");
+        return(0) if (_error('badeval', $@));
+        return(0) if (_error('equal', $obj, $sourceprog));
+    }
+    elsif (defined ($options->{'ext'}))
+    {
+        ($obj = $sourceprog) =~ s"@$ext"$options->{ext}"g;        
+        return(0) if (_error('equal', $obj, $sourceprog));
+    }
+       elsif (defined ($options->{'run'}))
+       {
+               $obj = "perlc$$";
+       }
+    else
+    {
+        ($obj = $sourceprog) =~ s"@$ext""g;
+        return(0) if (_error('equal', $obj, $sourceprog));
+    }
+    return($obj);
+}
+
+sub _createCode
+{
+    my ( $generated_cfile, $file, $final_output ) = @_;
+    my $return;
+
+    local($") = " -I";
+
+    if (@_ == 2)                                   # compiling a program   
+    {
+        _print( "$^X -I@INC -MO=CC,-o$generated_cfile $file\n", 36);
+        $return =  _run("$\18 -I@INC -MO=CC,-o$generated_cfile $file", 9);
+        $return;
+    }
+    else                                           # compiling a shared object
+    {            
+        _print( 
+            "$\18 -I@INC -MO=CC,-m$final_output,-o$generated_cfile $file\n", 36);
+        $return = 
+        _run("$\18 -I@INC -MO=CC,-m$final_output,-o$generated_cfile $file", 9);
+        $return;
+    }
+}
+
+sub _compileCode
+{
+    my ($sourceprog, $generated_cfile, $output_executable, $shared_object) = @_;
+    my @return;
+
+    if (@_ == 3)                            # just compiling a program 
+    {
+        $return[0] = 
+        _ccharness($sourceprog, "-o", $output_executable, $generated_cfile);  
+        $return[0];
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        my $object_file = $generated_cfile;
+        $object_file =~ s"\.c$"\.o";   
+
+        $return[0] = _ccharness($sourceprog, "-c", $generated_cfile);
+        $return[1] = _ccharness
+                            (
+                                $sourceprog, "-shared","-o", 
+                                $shared_object, $object_file 
+                            );
+        return(1) if (grep ($_, @return));
+        return(0);
+    }
+}
+
+sub _runCode
+{
+    my ($executable) = @_;
+    _print("$executable $options->{'argv'}\n", 36);
+    _run("$executable $options->{'argv'}", -1 );
+}
+
+sub _removeCode
+{
+    my ($file) = @_;
+    unlink($file) if (-e $file);
+}
+
+sub _ccharness
+{
+    my (@args) = @_;
+    local($") = " ";
+
+    my $sourceprog = shift(@args);
+    my ($libdir, $incdir);
+
+    if (-d "$Config{installarchlib}/CORE")
+    {
+        $libdir = "-L$Config{installarchlib}/CORE";
+        $incdir = "-I$Config{installarchlib}/CORE";
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        $libdir = "-L.."; 
+        $incdir = "-I..";
+    }
+
+    $libdir .= " -L$options->{L}" if (defined($options->{L}));
+    $incdir .= " -I$options->{L}" if (defined($options->{L}));
+
+    my $linkargs;
+
+    if (!grep(/^-[cS]$/, @ARGV))
+    {
+        $linkargs = sprintf("%s $libdir -lperl %s",@Config{qw(ldflags libs)});
+    }
+
+    my @sharedobjects = _getSharedObjects($sourceprog); 
+
+    my $cccmd = 
+        "$Config{cc} $Config{ccflags} $incdir @sharedobjects @args $linkargs";
+
+
+    _print ("$cccmd\n", 36);
+    _run("$cccmd", 18 );
+}
+
+sub _getSharedObjects
+{
+    my ($sourceprog) = @_;
+    my ($tmpfile, $incfile);
+    my (@return);
+    local($") = " -I";
+
+    if ($Config{'osname'} eq 'MSWin32') 
+    { 
+        # _addstuff;    
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        my ($tmpprog);
+        ($tmpprog = $sourceprog) =~ s"(.*)[\/\\](.*)"$2";
+        $tmpfile = "/tmp/$tmpprog.tst";
+        $incfile = "/tmp/$tmpprog.val";
+    }
+
+    my $fd = new FileHandle("> $tmpfile") || die "Couldn't open $tmpfile!\n";
+    my $fd2 = 
+        new FileHandle("$sourceprog") || die "Couldn't open $sourceprog!\n";
+
+    my $perl = <$fd2>;  # strip off header;
+
+    print $fd 
+<<"EOF";
+        use FileHandle;
+        my \$fh3  = new FileHandle("> $incfile") 
+                                        || die "Couldn't open $incfile\\n";
+
+        my \$key;
+        foreach \$key (keys(\%INC)) { print \$fh3 "\$key:\$INC{\$key}\\n"; }
+        close(\$fh3);
+        exit();
+EOF
+
+    print $fd (   <$fd2>    );
+    close($fd);
+
+    _print("$\18 -I@INC $tmpfile\n", 36);
+    _run("$\18 -I@INC $tmpfile", 9 );
+
+    my $fd = new FileHandle ("$incfile"); 
+    my @lines = <$fd>;    
+
+    unlink($tmpfile);
+    unlink($incfile);
+
+    my $line;
+    my $autolib;
+
+    foreach $line (@lines) 
+    {
+        chomp($line);
+        my ($modname, $modpath) = split(':', $line);
+        my ($dir, $file) = ($modpath=~ m"(.*)[\\/]($modname)");
+        
+        if ($autolib = _lookforAuto($dir, $file))
+        {
+            push(@return, $autolib);
+        }
+    }
+
+    return(@return);
+}
+
+sub _maketempfile
+{
+    my $return;
+
+#    if ($Config{'osname'} eq 'MSWin32') 
+#            { $return = "C:\\TEMP\\comp$$.p"; }
+#    else
+#            { $return = "/tmp/comp$$.p"; }
+
+    $return = "comp$$.p"; 
+
+    my $fd = new FileHandle( "> $return") || die "Couldn't open $return!\n";
+    print $fd $options->{'e'};
+    close($fd);
+
+    return($return);
+}
+    
+    
+sub _lookforAuto
+{
+    my ($dir, $file) = @_;    
+
+    my $relshared;
+    my $return;
+
+    ($relshared = $file) =~ s"(.*)\.pm"$1";
+
+    my ($tmp, $modname) = ($relshared =~ m"(?:(.*)[\\/]){0,1}(.*)"s);
+
+    $relshared .= 
+        ($Config{'osname'} eq 'MSWin32')? "\\$modname.dll" : "/$modname.so";
+    
+
+
+    if (-e ($return = "$Config{'installarchlib'}/auto/$relshared") )
+    {
+        return($return);    
+    }
+    elsif (-e ($return = "$Config{'installsitearch'}/auto/$relshared"))
+    {
+        return($return);
+    }
+    elsif (-e ($return = "$dir/arch/auto/$relshared"))
+    {
+        return($return);    
+    }
+    else
+    {
+        return(undef);
+    }
+}
+
+sub _getRegexps    # make the appropriate regexps for making executables, 
+{                  # shared libs
+
+    my ($program_ext, $module_ext) = ([],[]); 
+
+
+    @$program_ext = ($ENV{PERL_SCRIPT_EXT})? split(':', $ENV{PERL_SCRIPT_EXT}) :
+                                            ('.p$', '.pl$', '.bat$');
+
+
+    @$module_ext  = ($ENV{PERL_MODULE_EXT})? split(':', $ENV{PERL_MODULE_EXT}) :
+                                            ('.pm$');
+
+
+    _mungeRegexp( $program_ext );
+    _mungeRegexp( $module_ext  );    
+
+    return($program_ext, $module_ext);
+}
+
+sub _mungeRegexp
+{
+    my ($regexp) = @_;
+
+    grep(s"(^|[^\\])\."$1\x0\\."g, @$regexp);
+    grep(s"(^|[^\x0])\\\."$1\."g,  @$regexp);
+    grep(s"\x0""g,                 @$regexp);
+}
+
+
+sub _error
+{
+    my ($type, @args) = @_;
+
+    if ($type eq 'equal')
+    {
+            
+        if ($args[0] eq $args[1])
+        {
+            _print ("ERROR: The object file '$args[0]' does not generate a legitimate executable file! Skipping!\n", -1);
+            return(1);
+        }
+    }
+    elsif ($type eq 'badeval')
+    {
+        if ($args[0])
+        {
+            _print ("ERROR: $args[0]\n", -1);
+            return(1);
+        }
+    }
+    elsif ($type eq 'noextension')
+    {
+        my $progext = join(',', @{$args[1]});
+        my $modext  = join(',', @{$args[2]});
+
+        $progext =~ s"\\""g;
+        $modext  =~ s"\\""g;
+
+        $progext =~ s"\$""g;
+        $modext  =~ s"\$""g;
+
+        _print 
+        (
+"
+ERROR: '$args[0]' does not have a proper extension! Proper extensions are:
+
+    PROGRAM:       $progext 
+    SHARED OBJECT: $modext
+
+Use the '-prog' flag to force your files to be interpreted as programs.
+Use the '-mod' flag to force your files to be interpreted as modules.
+", -1
+        );
+        return(1);
+    }
+
+    return(0);
+}
+
+sub _checkopts
+{
+    my @errors;
+    local($") = "\n";
+
+    if ($options->{'log'})
+    {
+        $_fh = new FileHandle(">> $options->{'log'}") || push(@errors, "ERROR: Couldn't open $options->{'log'}\n");
+    }
+
+    if (($options->{'c'}) && (@ARGV > 1) && ($options->{'sav'} ))
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: The '-sav' and '-C' options are incompatible when you have more than 
+       one input file! ('-C' explicitly names resulting C code, '-sav' saves it,
+       and hence, with more than one file, the c code will be overwritten for 
+       each file that you compile)\n");
+    }
+    if (($options->{'o'}) && (@ARGV > 1))
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: The '-o' option is incompatible when you have more than one input file! 
+       (-o explicitly names the resulting executable, hence, with more than 
+       one file the names clash)\n");
+    }
+
+    if ($options->{'e'} && $options->{'sav'} && !$options->{'o'} && 
+                                                            !$options->{'C'})
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: You need to specify where you are going to save the resulting 
+       executable or C code,  when using '-sav' and '-e'. Use '-o' or '-C'.\n");
+    }
+
+    if (($options->{'regex'} || $options->{'run'} || $options->{'o'}) 
+                                                    && $options->{'gen'})
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: The options '-regex', '-run', and '-o' are incompatible with '-gen'. 
+       '-gen' says to stop at C generation, and the other three modify the 
+       compilation and/or running process!\n");
+    }
+
+    if ($options->{'run'} && $options->{'mod'})
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: Can't run modules that you are compiling! '-run' and '-mod' are 
+       incompatible!\n"); 
+    }
+
+    if ($options->{'e'} && @ARGV)
+    {
+        push (@errors, 
+"ERROR: The option '-e' needs to be all by itself without any other 
+       file arguments!\n");
+    }
+    if ($options->{'e'} && !($options->{'o'} || $options->{'run'}))
+    {
+        $options->{'run'} = 1;
+    }
+
+    if (!defined($options->{'verbose'})) 
+    { 
+        $options->{'verbose'} = ($options->{'log'})? 64 : 7; 
+    }
+
+    my $verbose_error;
+
+    if ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"[^tagfcd]" && 
+            !( $options->{'verbose'} eq '0' || 
+                ($options->{'verbose'} < 64 && $options->{'verbose'} > 0)))
+    {
+        $verbose_error = 1;
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: Illegal verbosity level.  Needs to have either the letters 
+       't','a','g','f','c', or 'd' in it or be between 0 and 63, inclusive.\n");
+    }
+
+    $options->{'verbose'} = ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"[tagfcd]")? 
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"d") * 32 +     
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"c") * 16 +     
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"f") * 8     +     
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"t") * 4     +     
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"a") * 2     +     
+                            ($options->{'verbose'} =~ m"g") * 1     
+                                                    : $options->{'verbose'};
+
+    if     (!$verbose_error && (    $options->{'log'} && 
+                                !(
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 8)   || 
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 16)  || 
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 32 ) 
+                                )
+                            )
+        )
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: The verbosity level '$options->{'verbose'}' does not output anything 
+       to a logfile, and you specified '-log'!\n");
+    } # }
+
+    if     (!$verbose_error && (    !$options->{'log'} && 
+                                (
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 8)   || 
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 16)  || 
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 32)  || 
+                                    ($options->{'verbose'} & 64)
+                                )
+                            )
+        )
+    {
+        push(@errors, 
+"ERROR: The verbosity level '$options->{'verbose'}' requires that you also 
+       specify a logfile via '-log'\n");
+    } # }
+
+
+    (_print( "\n". join("\n", @errors), -1), return(0)) if (@errors);
+    return(1);
+}
+
+sub _print
+{
+    my ($text, $flag ) = @_;
+    
+    my $logflag = int($flag/8) * 8;
+    my $regflag = $flag % 8;
+
+    if ($flag == -1 || ($flag & $options->{'verbose'}))
+    {
+        my $dolog = ((($logflag & $options->{'verbose'}) || $flag == -1) 
+                                                        && $options->{'log'}); 
+
+        my $doreg = (($regflag & $options->{'verbose'}) || $flag == -1);
+        
+        if ($doreg) { print( STDERR $text ); }
+        if ($dolog) { print $_fh $text; }
+    }
+}
+
+sub _run
+{
+    my ($command, $flag) = @_;
+
+    my $logflag = ($flag != -1)? int($flag/8) * 8 : 0;
+    my $regflag = $flag % 8;
+
+    if ($flag == -1 || ($flag & $options->{'verbose'}))
+    {
+        my $dolog = ($logflag & $options->{'verbose'} && $options->{'log'});
+        my $doreg = (($regflag & $options->{'verbose'}) || $flag == -1);
+
+        if ($doreg && !$dolog) 
+            { system("$command"); }
+
+        elsif ($doreg && $dolog) 
+            { my $text = `$command 2>&1`; print $_fh $text; print STDERR $text;}
+        else 
+            { my $text = `$command 2>&1`; print $_fh $text; }
+    }
+    else 
+    {
+        `$command 2>&1`; 
+    }
+    return($?);
+}
+
+sub _usage
+{
+    _print
+    ( 
+    <<"EOF"
+
+Usage: $0 <file_list> 
+
+    Flags with arguments
+        -L       < extra library dirs for installation (form of 'dir1:dir2') >
+        -I       < extra include dirs for installation (form of 'dir1:dir2') >
+        -C       < explicit name of resulting C code > 
+        -o       < explicit name of resulting executable >
+        -e       < to compile 'one liners'. Need executable name (-o) or '-run'>
+        -regex   < rename regex, -regex 's/\.p/\.exe/' compiles a.p to a.exe >
+        -verbose < verbose level (1-63, or following letters 'gatfcd' >
+        -argv    < arguments for the executables to be run via '-run' or '-e' > 
+
+    Boolean flags
+        -gen     ( to just generate the c code. Implies '-sav' )
+        -sav     ( to save intermediate c code, (and executables with '-run'))
+        -run     ( to run the compiled program on the fly, as were interpreted.)
+        -prog    ( to indicate that the files on command line are programs )
+     &