This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
File::Glob: Remove docs specific to Mac Classic
authorFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sat, 29 Oct 2011 16:54:59 +0000 (09:54 -0700)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Sat, 29 Oct 2011 18:29:45 +0000 (11:29 -0700)
These have been obsolete since commit e37778c28b in 2009.

ext/File-Glob/Glob.pm

index 0b72a32..e790582 100644 (file)
@@ -325,46 +325,6 @@ Win32 users should use the real slash.  If you really want to use
 backslashes, consider using Sarathy's File::DosGlob, which comes with
 the standard Perl distribution.
 
-=item *
-
-Mac OS (Classic) users should note a few differences. Since
-Mac OS is not Unix, when the glob code encounters a tilde glob (e.g.
-~user) and the C<GLOB_TILDE> flag is used, it simply returns that
-pattern without doing any expansion.
-
-Glob on Mac OS is case-insensitive by default (if you don't use any
-flags). If you specify any flags at all and still want glob
-to be case-insensitive, you must include C<GLOB_NOCASE> in the flags.
-
-The path separator is ':' (aka colon), not '/' (aka slash). Mac OS users
-should be careful about specifying relative pathnames. While a full path
-always begins with a volume name, a relative pathname should always
-begin with a ':'.  If specifying a volume name only, a trailing ':' is
-required.
-
-The specification of pathnames in glob patterns adheres to the usual Mac
-OS conventions: The path separator is a colon ':', not a slash '/'. A
-full path always begins with a volume name. A relative pathname on Mac
-OS must always begin with a ':', except when specifying a file or
-directory name in the current working directory, where the leading colon
-is optional. If specifying a volume name only, a trailing ':' is
-required. Due to these rules, a glob like E<lt>*:E<gt> will find all
-mounted volumes, while a glob like E<lt>*E<gt> or E<lt>:*E<gt> will find
-all files and directories in the current directory.
-
-Note that updirs in the glob pattern are resolved before the matching begins,
-i.e. a pattern like "*HD:t?p::a*" will be matched as "*HD:a*". Note also,
-that a single trailing ':' in the pattern is ignored (unless it's a volume
-name pattern like "*HD:"), i.e. a glob like E<lt>:*:E<gt> will find both
-directories I<and> files (and not, as one might expect, only directories).
-You can, however, use the C<GLOB_MARK> flag to distinguish (without a file
-test) directory names from file names.
-
-If the C<GLOB_MARK> flag is set, all directory paths will have a ':' appended.
-Since a directory like 'lib:' is I<not> a valid I<relative> path on Mac OS,
-both a leading and a trailing colon will be added, when the directory name in
-question doesn't contain any colons (e.g. 'lib' becomes ':lib:').
-
 =back
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO