This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
some method calls not autoloaded
authorYitzchak Scott-Thoennes <sthoenna@efn.org>
Tue, 2 Sep 2003 15:06:29 +0000 (08:06 -0700)
committerRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Tue, 2 Sep 2003 21:21:27 +0000 (21:21 +0000)
Message-ID: <20030902220629.GA2952@efn.org>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@21007

pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlsub.pod

index 3a17659..069e7d2 100644 (file)
@@ -2736,7 +2736,7 @@ C<redo> work.
 
 =item no Module
 
 
 =item no Module
 
-See the C<use> function, which C<no> is the opposite of.
+See the C<use> function, of which C<no> is the opposite.
 
 =item oct EXPR
 
 
 =item oct EXPR
 
@@ -6160,7 +6160,8 @@ features back into the current package.  The module can implement its
 C<import> method any way it likes, though most modules just choose to
 derive their C<import> method via inheritance from the C<Exporter> class that
 is defined in the C<Exporter> module.  See L<Exporter>.  If no C<import>
 C<import> method any way it likes, though most modules just choose to
 derive their C<import> method via inheritance from the C<Exporter> class that
 is defined in the C<Exporter> module.  See L<Exporter>.  If no C<import>
-method can be found then the call is skipped.
+method can be found then the call is skipped, even if there is an AUTOLOAD
+method.
 
 If you do not want to call the package's C<import> method (for instance,
 to stop your namespace from being altered), explicitly supply the empty list:
 
 If you do not want to call the package's C<import> method (for instance,
 to stop your namespace from being altered), explicitly supply the empty list:
@@ -6200,6 +6201,8 @@ through the end of the file).
 
 There's a corresponding C<no> command that unimports meanings imported
 by C<use>, i.e., it calls C<unimport Module LIST> instead of C<import>.
 
 There's a corresponding C<no> command that unimports meanings imported
 by C<use>, i.e., it calls C<unimport Module LIST> instead of C<import>.
+It behaves exactly as C<import> does with respect to VERSION, an
+omitted LIST, empty LIST, or no unimport method being found.
 
     no integer;
     no strict 'refs';
 
     no integer;
     no strict 'refs';
index 2969341..719197e 100644 (file)
@@ -1259,7 +1259,7 @@ C<require> replacement as C<require Foo::Bar>, it will actually receive
 the argument C<"Foo/Bar.pm"> in @_.  See L<perlfunc/require>.
 
 And, as you'll have noticed from the previous example, if you override
 the argument C<"Foo/Bar.pm"> in @_.  See L<perlfunc/require>.
 
 And, as you'll have noticed from the previous example, if you override
-C<glob>, the C<E<lt>*E<gt>> glob operator is overridden as well.
+C<glob>, the C<< <*> >> glob operator is overridden as well.
 
 In a similar fashion, overriding the C<readline> function also overrides
 the equivalent I/O operator C<< <FILEHANDLE> >>.
 
 In a similar fashion, overriding the C<readline> function also overrides
 the equivalent I/O operator C<< <FILEHANDLE> >>.
@@ -1279,7 +1279,8 @@ been passed to the original subroutine.  The fully qualified name
 of the original subroutine magically appears in the global $AUTOLOAD
 variable of the same package as the C<AUTOLOAD> routine.  The name
 is not passed as an ordinary argument because, er, well, just
 of the original subroutine magically appears in the global $AUTOLOAD
 variable of the same package as the C<AUTOLOAD> routine.  The name
 is not passed as an ordinary argument because, er, well, just
-because, that's why...
+because, that's why.  (As an exception, a method call to a nonexistent
+C<import> or C<unimport> method is just skipped instead.)
 
 Many C<AUTOLOAD> routines load in a definition for the requested
 subroutine using eval(), then execute that subroutine using a special
 
 Many C<AUTOLOAD> routines load in a definition for the requested
 subroutine using eval(), then execute that subroutine using a special
@@ -1305,7 +1306,7 @@ even need parentheses:
     use subs qw(date who ls);
     date;
     who "am", "i";
     use subs qw(date who ls);
     date;
     who "am", "i";
-    ls -l;
+    ls '-l';
 
 A more complete example of this is the standard Shell module, which
 can treat undefined subroutine calls as calls to external programs.
 
 A more complete example of this is the standard Shell module, which
 can treat undefined subroutine calls as calls to external programs.