This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
epigraphs - Standardize two-space indent for poetry etc; no indent for prose
authorSteve Hay <steve.m.hay@googlemail.com>
Wed, 14 Jan 2015 18:33:36 +0000 (18:33 +0000)
committerSteve Hay <steve.m.hay@googlemail.com>
Thu, 15 Jan 2015 08:01:50 +0000 (08:01 +0000)
Porting/epigraphs.pod

index 969a3d0..a99b98c 100644 (file)
@@ -21,41 +21,41 @@ Consult your favorite dictionary for details.
 
 L<Announced on 2014-12-20 by Max Maischein|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2014/12/msg223774.html>
 
-     "Zebadiah, Hilda and I salvaged and put everything into the basket.
-      Hilda started to put it into our wardrobe-and it was heavy. So
-      we looked. Packed as tight as when we left Oz. Six bananas-and
-      everything else. Cross my heart. No, go look."
-     "Hmmm- Jake, can you write equations for a picnic basket that
-      refills itself? Will it go on doing so?"
-     "Zeb, equations can be written to describe anything. The description
-      would be simpler for a basket that replenishes itself indefinitely
-      than for one that does it once and stops-I would have to describe
-      the discontinuity."
+"Zebadiah, Hilda and I salvaged and put everything into the basket.
+Hilda started to put it into our wardrobe-and it was heavy. So
+we looked. Packed as tight as when we left Oz. Six bananas-and
+everything else. Cross my heart. No, go look."
+"Hmmm- Jake, can you write equations for a picnic basket that
+refills itself? Will it go on doing so?"
+"Zeb, equations can be written to describe anything. The description
+would be simpler for a basket that replenishes itself indefinitely
+than for one that does it once and stops-I would have to describe
+the discontinuity."
 
 =head2 v5.21.6 - Jeff Noon, Vurt
 
 L<Announced on 2014-11-20 by Chris 'BinGOs' Williams|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2014/11/msg222448.html>
 
-  GAME CAT
-
-  EXCHANGE MECHANISMS. Sometimes we lose precious
-  things. Friends and colleagues, fellow travellers in the
-  Vurt, sometimes we lose them; even lovers we sometimes
-  lose. And get bad things in exchange: aliens, objects,
-  snakes, and sometimes even death. Things we don't want.
-  This is part of the deal, part of the game deal;
-  all things, in all worlds, must be kept in balance.
-  Kittlings often ask, who decides on the swappings? Now then,
-  some say it's all accidental; that some poor Vurt thing
-  finds himself too close to a door, at too critical a time,
-  just when something real is being lost. Whoosh! Swap time!
-  Others say that some kind of overseer is working the
-  MECHANISMS OF EXCHANGE, deciding the fate of innocents.
-  The Cat can only tease at this, because of the big secrets
-  involved, and because of the levels between you, the reader,
-  and me, the Game Cat. Hey, listen; I've struggled to get
-  where I am today; why should I give you the easy route?
-  Get working, kittlings! Reach up higher. Work the Vurt.
+GAME CAT
+
+EXCHANGE MECHANISMS. Sometimes we lose precious
+things. Friends and colleagues, fellow travellers in the
+Vurt, sometimes we lose them; even lovers we sometimes
+lose. And get bad things in exchange: aliens, objects,
+snakes, and sometimes even death. Things we don't want.
+This is part of the deal, part of the game deal;
+all things, in all worlds, must be kept in balance.
+Kittlings often ask, who decides on the swappings? Now then,
+some say it's all accidental; that some poor Vurt thing
+finds himself too close to a door, at too critical a time,
+just when something real is being lost. Whoosh! Swap time!
+Others say that some kind of overseer is working the
+MECHANISMS OF EXCHANGE, deciding the fate of innocents.
+The Cat can only tease at this, because of the big secrets
+involved, and because of the levels between you, the reader,
+and me, the Game Cat. Hey, listen; I've struggled to get
+where I am today; why should I give you the easy route?
+Get working, kittlings! Reach up higher. Work the Vurt.
 
 =head2 v5.21.5 - Friso Wiegersma (text), Jean Ferrat (music), Wim Sonneveld (performer), Het Dorp
 
@@ -121,27 +121,27 @@ L<Announced on 2014-10-20 by Abigail|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.p
 
 L<Announced on 2014-09-20 by Steve Hay|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2014/09/msg220267.html>
 
-  To-day, being in latitude 83° 20', longitude 43° 5' W. (the sea being
-  of an extraordinarily dark colour), we again saw land from the
-  masthead, and, upon a closer scrutiny, found it to be one of a group
-  of very large islands.  The shore was precipitous, and the interior
-  seemed to be well wooded, a circumstance which occasioned us great
-  joy.  In about four hours from our first discovering the land we came
-  to anchor in ten fathoms, sandy bottom, a league from the coast, as a
-  high surf, with strong ripples here and there, rendered a nearer
-  approach of doubtful expediency.  The two largest boats were now
-  ordered out, and a party, well armed (among whome were Peters and
-  myself), proceeded to look for an opening in the reef which appeared
-  to encircle the island.  After searching about for some time, we
-  discovered an inlet, which we were entering, when we saw four large
-  canoes put off from the shore, filled with men who seemed to be well
-  armed.  We waited for them to come up, and, as they moved with great
-  rapidity, they were soon within hail.  Captain Guy now held up a white
-  handkerchief on the blade of an oar, when the strangers made a full
-  stop, and commenced a loud jabbering all at once, intermingled with
-  occasional shouts, in which we could distinguish the words Anamoo-moo!
-  and Lama-Lama!  They continued this for at least half an hour, during
-  which we had a good opportunity of observing their appearance.
+To-day, being in latitude 83° 20', longitude 43° 5' W. (the sea being
+of an extraordinarily dark colour), we again saw land from the
+masthead, and, upon a closer scrutiny, found it to be one of a group
+of very large islands.  The shore was precipitous, and the interior
+seemed to be well wooded, a circumstance which occasioned us great
+joy.  In about four hours from our first discovering the land we came
+to anchor in ten fathoms, sandy bottom, a league from the coast, as a
+high surf, with strong ripples here and there, rendered a nearer
+approach of doubtful expediency.  The two largest boats were now
+ordered out, and a party, well armed (among whome were Peters and
+myself), proceeded to look for an opening in the reef which appeared
+to encircle the island.  After searching about for some time, we
+discovered an inlet, which we were entering, when we saw four large
+canoes put off from the shore, filled with men who seemed to be well
+armed.  We waited for them to come up, and, as they moved with great
+rapidity, they were soon within hail.  Captain Guy now held up a white
+handkerchief on the blade of an oar, when the strangers made a full
+stop, and commenced a loud jabbering all at once, intermingled with
+occasional shouts, in which we could distinguish the words Anamoo-moo!
+and Lama-Lama!  They continued this for at least half an hour, during
+which we had a good opportunity of observing their appearance.
 
 =head2 v5.20.1 - Lorenzo da Ponte, Così fan tutte
 
@@ -264,57 +264,57 @@ L<Announced on 2014-08-25 by Steve Hay|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5
 
 L<Announced on 2014-08-20 by Peter Martini|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2014/08/msg218826.html>
 
-    If they just went straight they might go far,
-    They are strong and brave and true;
-    But they're always tired of the things that are,
-    And they want the strange and new.
-    They say: "Could I find my proper groove,
-    What a deep mark I would make!"
-    So they chop and change, and each fresh move
-    Is only a fresh mistake.
+  If they just went straight they might go far,
+  They are strong and brave and true;
+  But they're always tired of the things that are,
+  And they want the strange and new.
+  They say: "Could I find my proper groove,
+  What a deep mark I would make!"
+  So they chop and change, and each fresh move
+  Is only a fresh mistake.
 
 =head2 v5.21.2 - Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, Charlie Duke, Final minutes of communication of the first manned moon landing, July 20, 1969.
 
 L<Announced on 2014-07-20 by Abigail|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2014/07/msg217937.html>
 
-    Armstrong: Okay. Here's a...Looks like a good area here.
-    Aldrin:    I got the shadow out there. 
-    Aldrin:    250, down at 2 1/2, 19 forward.
-    Aldrin:    Altitude, velocity lights. 
-    Aldrin:    3 1/2 down, 220 feet, 13 forward.
-    Aldrin:    11 forward. Coming down nicely.
-    Armstrong: Gonna be right over that crater. 
-    Aldrin:    200 feet, 4 1/2 down.
-    Aldrin:    5 1/2 down.
-    Armstrong: I got a good spot [garbled].
-    Aldrin:    160 feet, 6 1/2 down.
-    Aldrin:    5 1/2 down, 9 forward. You're looking good.
-    Aldrin:    120 feet.
-    Aldrin:    100 feet, 3 1/2 down, 9 forward. Five percent. Quantity light. 
-    Aldrin:    Okay. 75 feet. And it's looking good. Down a half, 6 forward.
-    Duke:      60 seconds.
-    Aldrin:    Light's on. 
-    Aldrin:    60 feet, down 2 1/2. 2 forward. 2 forward. That's good. 
-    Aldrin:    40 feet, down 2 1/2. Picking up some dust. 
-    Aldrin:    30 feet, 2 1/2 down. [Garbled] shadow. 
-    Aldrin:    4 forward. 4 forward. Drifting to the right a little. 20 feet,
-               down a half.
-    Duke:      30 seconds.
-    Aldrin:    Drifting forward just a little bit; that's good.
-    Aldrin:    Contact Light. 
-    Armstrong: Shutdown.
-    Aldrin:    Okay. Engine Stop. 
-    Aldrin:    ACA out of Detent.
-    Armstrong: Out of Detent. Auto.
-    Aldrin:    Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off.
-               Engine Arm, Off. 413 is in. 
-    Duke:      We copy you down, Eagle.
-    Armstrong: Engine arm is off.
-    Armstrong: Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.
-    Duke:      Roger, Twan...[correcting himself] Tranquility. We copy you on
-               the ground. You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue.
-               We're breathing again. Thanks a lot.
-    Aldrin:    Thank you. 
+  Armstrong: Okay. Here's a...Looks like a good area here.
+  Aldrin:    I got the shadow out there. 
+  Aldrin:    250, down at 2 1/2, 19 forward.
+  Aldrin:    Altitude, velocity lights. 
+  Aldrin:    3 1/2 down, 220 feet, 13 forward.
+  Aldrin:    11 forward. Coming down nicely.
+  Armstrong: Gonna be right over that crater. 
+  Aldrin:    200 feet, 4 1/2 down.
+  Aldrin:    5 1/2 down.
+  Armstrong: I got a good spot [garbled].
+  Aldrin:    160 feet, 6 1/2 down.
+  Aldrin:    5 1/2 down, 9 forward. You're looking good.
+  Aldrin:    120 feet.
+  Aldrin:    100 feet, 3 1/2 down, 9 forward. Five percent. Quantity light. 
+  Aldrin:    Okay. 75 feet. And it's looking good. Down a half, 6 forward.
+  Duke:      60 seconds.
+  Aldrin:    Light's on. 
+  Aldrin:    60 feet, down 2 1/2. 2 forward. 2 forward. That's good. 
+  Aldrin:    40 feet, down 2 1/2. Picking up some dust. 
+  Aldrin:    30 feet, 2 1/2 down. [Garbled] shadow. 
+  Aldrin:    4 forward. 4 forward. Drifting to the right a little. 20 feet,
+             down a half.
+  Duke:      30 seconds.
+  Aldrin:    Drifting forward just a little bit; that's good.
+  Aldrin:    Contact Light. 
+  Armstrong: Shutdown.
+  Aldrin:    Okay. Engine Stop. 
+  Aldrin:    ACA out of Detent.
+  Armstrong: Out of Detent. Auto.
+  Aldrin:    Mode Control, both Auto. Descent Engine Command Override, Off.
+             Engine Arm, Off. 413 is in. 
+  Duke:      We copy you down, Eagle.
+  Armstrong: Engine arm is off.
+  Armstrong: Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.
+  Duke:      Roger, Twan...[correcting himself] Tranquility. We copy you on
+             the ground. You got a bunch of guys about to turn blue.
+             We're breathing again. Thanks a lot.
+  Aldrin:    Thank you. 
 
 =head2 v5.21.1 - Robert Jordan, The Crossroads of Twilights, Book 10 of the Wheel of Time
 
@@ -473,33 +473,33 @@ One bird said to Billy Pilgrim, "Pee-tee-weet?"
 
 L<Announced on 2013-11-20 by Chris 'BinGOs' Williams|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2013/11/msg210043.html>
 
-      Interior: cheap cafe. All the customers are Vikings. Mr and Mrs Bun enter downwards (on wires).
-
-    Mr. Bun: Morning.
-    Waitress: Morning.
-    Mr. Bun: What have you got, then?
-    Waitress: Well there's egg and bacon; egg, sausage and bacon; egg and spam; egg, bacon and spam;
-              egg, bacon, sausage and spam; spam, bacon, sausage and spam; spam, egg, spam, spam, bacon and spam;
-              spam, spam, spam, egg and spam; spam, spam, spam, spam, spam, spam, baked beans, spam, spam, spam and spam;
-              or lobster thermidor aux crevettes, with a mornay sauce garnished with truffle pate, brandy and a fried
-              egg on top and spam
-    Mrs. Bun: Have you got anything without spam in it?
-    Waitress: Well, there's spam, egg, sausage and spam. That's not got MUCH spam in it.
-    Mrs. Bun: I don't want ANY spam.
-    Mr. Bun: Why can't she have egg, bacon, spam and sausage?
-    Mrs. Bun: That's got spam in it!
-    Mr. Bun: Not as much as spam, egg, sausage and spam.
-    Mrs. Bun: Look, could I have egg, bacon, spam and sausage, without the spam.
-    Waitress: Uuuuuuggggh!
-    Mrs. Bun: What d'you mean, uugggh! I don't like spam.
-    Vikings: (singing) Spam, spam, spam, spam, spam ... spam, spam, spam, spam ... lovely spam, wonderful spam ...
-
-      (Brief shot of a Viking ship)
-
-    Waitress: Shut up. Shut up! Shut up! You can't have egg, bacon, spam and sausage without the spam.
-    Mrs. Bun: Why not?
-    Waitress: No, it wouldn't be egg, bacon, spam and sausage, would it?
-    Mrs. Bun: I don't like spam!
+    Interior: cheap cafe. All the customers are Vikings. Mr and Mrs Bun enter downwards (on wires).
+
+  Mr. Bun: Morning.
+  Waitress: Morning.
+  Mr. Bun: What have you got, then?
+  Waitress: Well there's egg and bacon; egg, sausage and bacon; egg and spam; egg, bacon and spam;
+            egg, bacon, sausage and spam; spam, bacon, sausage and spam; spam, egg, spam, spam, bacon and spam;
+            spam, spam, spam, egg and spam; spam, spam, spam, spam, spam, spam, baked beans, spam, spam, spam and spam;
+            or lobster thermidor aux crevettes, with a mornay sauce garnished with truffle pate, brandy and a fried
+            egg on top and spam
+  Mrs. Bun: Have you got anything without spam in it?
+  Waitress: Well, there's spam, egg, sausage and spam. That's not got MUCH spam in it.
+  Mrs. Bun: I don't want ANY spam.
+  Mr. Bun: Why can't she have egg, bacon, spam and sausage?
+  Mrs. Bun: That's got spam in it!
+  Mr. Bun: Not as much as spam, egg, sausage and spam.
+  Mrs. Bun: Look, could I have egg, bacon, spam and sausage, without the spam.
+  Waitress: Uuuuuuggggh!
+  Mrs. Bun: What d'you mean, uugggh! I don't like spam.
+  Vikings: (singing) Spam, spam, spam, spam, spam ... spam, spam, spam, spam ... lovely spam, wonderful spam ...
+
+    (Brief shot of a Viking ship)
+
+  Waitress: Shut up. Shut up! Shut up! You can't have egg, bacon, spam and sausage without the spam.
+  Mrs. Bun: Why not?
+  Waitress: No, it wouldn't be egg, bacon, spam and sausage, would it?
+  Mrs. Bun: I don't like spam!
 
 =head2 v5.19.5 - Charles Baudelaire, "The Flowers of Evil", 51. The Cat
 
@@ -893,17 +893,28 @@ world is richer for it.
 L<Announced on 2012-12-18 by Dave Rolsky|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2012/12/msg196707.html>
 
 No thought.
-  The boy extinguished. Only a place.
-  This place.
-  Motionless, the Pragma sat facing him, the bare soles of his feet flat against each other, his dark frock scored by the shadows of deep folds, his eyes as empty as the child they watched.
-  A place without breath or sound. A place of sight alone. A place without before or after . . . almost.
-  For the first lances of sunlight careered over the glacier, as ponderous as great tree limbs in the wind. Shadows hardened and light gleamed across the Pragma’s ancient skull.
-  The old man’s left hand forsook his right sleeve, bearing a watery knife. And like a rope in water, his arm pitched outward, fingertips trailing across the blade as the knife swung languidly into the air, the sun skating and the dark shrine plunging across its mirror back . . .
-  And the place where Kellhus had once existed extended an open hand—the blond hairs like luminous filaments against tanned skin—and grasped the knife from stunned space.
-  The slap of pommel against palm triggered the collapse of place into little boy. The pale stench of his body. Breath, sound, and lurching thoughts.
-  I have been legion . . .
-  In his periphery, he could see the spike of the sun ease from the mountain. He felt drunk with exhaustion. In the recoil of his trance, it seemed all he could hear were the twigs arching and bobbing in the wind, pulled by leaves like a million sails no bigger than his hand. Cause everywhere, but amid countless minute happenings—diffuse, useless.
-  Now I understand.
+
+The boy extinguished. Only a place.
+
+This place.
+
+Motionless, the Pragma sat facing him, the bare soles of his feet flat against each other, his dark frock scored by the shadows of deep folds, his eyes as empty as the child they watched.
+
+A place without breath or sound. A place of sight alone. A place without before or after . . . almost.
+
+For the first lances of sunlight careered over the glacier, as ponderous as great tree limbs in the wind. Shadows hardened and light gleamed across the Pragma’s ancient skull.
+
+The old man’s left hand forsook his right sleeve, bearing a watery knife. And like a rope in water, his arm pitched outward, fingertips trailing across the blade as the knife swung languidly into the air, the sun skating and the dark shrine plunging across its mirror back . . .
+
+And the place where Kellhus had once existed extended an open hand—the blond hairs like luminous filaments against tanned skin—and grasped the knife from stunned space.
+
+The slap of pommel against palm triggered the collapse of place into little boy. The pale stench of his body. Breath, sound, and lurching thoughts.
+
+I have been legion . . .
+
+In his periphery, he could see the spike of the sun ease from the mountain. He felt drunk with exhaustion. In the recoil of his trance, it seemed all he could hear were the twigs arching and bobbing in the wind, pulled by leaves like a million sails no bigger than his hand. Cause everywhere, but amid countless minute happenings—diffuse, useless.
+
+Now I understand.
 
 =head2 v5.17.6 - Kurt Vonnegut, The Sirens of Titan
 
@@ -1144,32 +1155,32 @@ L<Announced on 2012-05-20 by Ricardo Signes|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.
 
 L<Announced on 2012-03-20 by Abigail|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2012/03/msg184824.html>
 
- How many roads must a man walk down
- Before you call him a man?
- Yes, 'n' how many seas must a white dove sail
- Before she sleeps in the sand?
- Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannonballs fly
- Before they're forever banned?
- The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
- The answer is blowin' in the wind
-
- How many years can a mountain exist
- Before it's washed to the sea?
- Yes, 'n' how many years can some people exist
- Before they're allowed to be free?
- Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head
- Pretending he just doesn't see?
- The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
- The answer is blowin' in the wind
-
- How many times must a man look up
- Before he can see the sky?
- Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
- Before he can hear people cry?
- Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
- That too many people have died?
- The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
- The answer is blowin' in the wind
 How many roads must a man walk down
 Before you call him a man?
 Yes, 'n' how many seas must a white dove sail
 Before she sleeps in the sand?
 Yes, 'n' how many times must the cannonballs fly
 Before they're forever banned?
 The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
 The answer is blowin' in the wind
+
 How many years can a mountain exist
 Before it's washed to the sea?
 Yes, 'n' how many years can some people exist
 Before they're allowed to be free?
 Yes, 'n' how many times can a man turn his head
 Pretending he just doesn't see?
 The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
 The answer is blowin' in the wind
+
 How many times must a man look up
 Before he can see the sky?
 Yes, 'n' how many ears must one man have
 Before he can hear people cry?
 Yes, 'n' how many deaths will it take till he knows
 That too many people have died?
 The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
 The answer is blowin' in the wind
 
     -- Bob Dylan, Spring 1962
 
@@ -1323,20 +1334,20 @@ the heart of the programmer.
 
 L<Announced on 2011-09-20 by Stevan Little|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2011/09/msg177427.html>
 
-  All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath
-  the surface do so at their peril. Those who read the symbol
-  do so at their peril.
+All art is at once surface and symbol. Those who go beneath
+the surface do so at their peril. Those who read the symbol
+do so at their peril.
 
-  It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors.
-  Diversity of opinion about a work of art shows that the
-  work is new, complex, and vital. When critics disagree, the
-  artist is in accord with himself.
+It is the spectator, and not life, that art really mirrors.
+Diversity of opinion about a work of art shows that the
+work is new, complex, and vital. When critics disagree, the
+artist is in accord with himself.
 
-  We can forgive a man for making a useful thing as long as
-  he does not admire it. The only excuse for making a useless
-  thing is that one admires it intensely.
+We can forgive a man for making a useful thing as long as
+he does not admire it. The only excuse for making a useless
+thing is that one admires it intensely.
 
-  All art is quite useless.
+All art is quite useless.
 
     -- Oscar Wilde, From the preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray
 
@@ -1391,8 +1402,7 @@ the results.  Except you -- and you'll know them because you'll
 
 L<Announced on 2011-06-20 by David Golden|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2011/06/msg173748.html>
 
-  If you dare nothing, then when the day is over, nothing is all
-  you will have gained.
+If you dare nothing, then when the day is over, nothing is all you will have gained.
 
 =head2 v5.12.4 - William Schwenck Gilbert, "Trial By Jury"
 
@@ -1542,14 +1552,14 @@ L<Announced on 2011-03-20 by Florian Ragwitz|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl
 
 L<Announced on 2011-02-20 by Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2011/02/msg169340.html>
 
-    Skalat maðr rúnar rísta,
-    nema ráða vel kunni.
-    Þat verðr mörgum manni,
-    es of myrkvan staf villisk.
-    Sák á telgðu talkni
-    tíu launstafi ristna.
-    Þat hefr lauka lindi
-    langs ofrtrega fengit.
+  Skalat maðr rúnar rísta,
+  nema ráða vel kunni.
+  Þat verðr mörgum manni,
+  es of myrkvan staf villisk.
+  Sák á telgðu talkni
+  tíu launstafi ristna.
+  Þat hefr lauka lindi
+  langs ofrtrega fengit.
 
 =head2 v5.13.9 - John F Kennedy, L<Inaugural Address January 20, 1961|http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy%27s_Inaugural_Address>
 
@@ -1680,10 +1690,10 @@ L<Announced on 2010-08-20 by Florian Ragwitz|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl
 it, but her head was so full of the Lobster Quadrille, that she hardly knew what
 she was saying, and the words came very queer indeed:--
 
-    "'Tis the voice of the Lobster; I heard him declare,
-    "You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair."
-    As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
-    Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.'
+  "'Tis the voice of the Lobster; I heard him declare,
+  "You have baked me too brown, I must sugar my hair."
+  As a duck with its eyelids, so he with his nose
+  Trims his belt and his buttons, and turns out his toes.'
 
 
 `That's different from what I used to say when I was a child,' said the Gryphon.
@@ -1868,8 +1878,8 @@ of a spiral nebula. The orbits of the members of a karass about their
 common wampeter are spiritual orbits, naturally. It is souls and not
 bodies that revolve. As Bokonon invites us to sing:
 
-   Around and around and around we spin,
-   With feet of lead and wings of tin . . .
+  Around and around and around we spin,
+  With feet of lead and wings of tin . . .
 
 =head2 v5.12.0 - Lewis Carroll, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"
 
@@ -1965,28 +1975,28 @@ L<Announced on 2020-03-21 by Jesse Vincent|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.p
 
 L<Announced on 2010-02-21 by Steve Hay|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2010/02/msg156957.html>
 
-    A little child, a limber elf,
-    Singing, dancing to itself,
-    A fairy thing with red round cheeks,
-    That always finds, and never seeks,
-    Makes such a vision to the sight
-    As fills a father's eyes with light;
-    And pleasures flow in so thick and fast
-    Upon his heart, that he at last
-    Must needs express his love's excess
-    With words of unmeant bitterness.
-    Perhaps 'tis pretty to force together
-    Thoughts so all unlike each other;
-    To mutter and mock a broken charm,
-    To dally with wrong that does no harm.
-    Perhaps 'tis tender too and pretty
-    At each wild word to feel within
-    A sweet recoil of love and pity.
-    And what, if in a world of sin
-    (O sorrow and shame should this be true!)
-    Such giddiness of heart and brain
-    Comes seldom save from rage and pain,
-    So talks as it's most used to do.
+  A little child, a limber elf,
+  Singing, dancing to itself,
+  A fairy thing with red round cheeks,
+  That always finds, and never seeks,
+  Makes such a vision to the sight
+  As fills a father's eyes with light;
+  And pleasures flow in so thick and fast
+  Upon his heart, that he at last
+  Must needs express his love's excess
+  With words of unmeant bitterness.
+  Perhaps 'tis pretty to force together
+  Thoughts so all unlike each other;
+  To mutter and mock a broken charm,
+  To dally with wrong that does no harm.
+  Perhaps 'tis tender too and pretty
+  At each wild word to feel within
+  A sweet recoil of love and pity.
+  And what, if in a world of sin
+  (O sorrow and shame should this be true!)
+  Such giddiness of heart and brain
+  Comes seldom save from rage and pain,
+  So talks as it's most used to do.
 
 =head2 v5.11.4 - Fyodor Dostoevsky, "Crime and Punishment"
 
@@ -2349,35 +2359,35 @@ revolving door and comes out in front.'
 
 L<Announced on 2006-01-31 by Nicholas Clark|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2006/01/msg109190.html>
 
-    It's not that easy bein' green
-    Having to spend each day the color of the leaves
-    When I think it could be nicer being red or yellow or gold
-    Or something much more colorful like that
+  It's not that easy bein' green
+  Having to spend each day the color of the leaves
+  When I think it could be nicer being red or yellow or gold
+  Or something much more colorful like that
 
-    It's not easy bein' green
-    It seems you blend in with so many other ordinary things
-    And people tend to pass you over 'cause you're
-    Not standing out like flashy sparkles in the water
-    Or stars in the sky
+  It's not easy bein' green
+  It seems you blend in with so many other ordinary things
+  And people tend to pass you over 'cause you're
+  Not standing out like flashy sparkles in the water
+  Or stars in the sky
 
-    But green's the color of Spring
-    And green can be cool and friendly-like
-    And green can be big like an ocean
-    Or important like a mountain
-    Or tall like a tree
+  But green's the color of Spring
+  And green can be cool and friendly-like
+  And green can be big like an ocean
+  Or important like a mountain
+  Or tall like a tree
 
-    When green is all there is to be
-    It could make you wonder why, but why wonder why?
-    Wonder I am green and it'll do fine, it's beautiful
-    And I think it's what I want to be
+  When green is all there is to be
+  It could make you wonder why, but why wonder why?
+  Wonder I am green and it'll do fine, it's beautiful
+  And I think it's what I want to be
 
 =head2 v5.8.8-RC1 - Cosgrove Hall Productions, "Dangermouse"
 
 L<Announced on 2006-01-20 by Nicholas Clark|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2006/01/msg108833.html>
 
-Greenback: And the world is mine, all mine. Muhahahahaha. See to it!
+  Greenback: And the world is mine, all mine. Muhahahahaha. See to it!
 
-Stiletto: Si, Barone. Subito, Barone.
+  Stiletto: Si, Barone. Subito, Barone.
 
 =head2 v5.8.7 - Sergei Prokofiev, "Peter and the Wolf"
 
@@ -2868,20 +2878,20 @@ L<Announced on 2000-12-18 by Gurusamy Sarathy|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/per
 
 L<Announced on 2000-03-23 by Gurusamy Sarathy|http://www.nntp.perl.org/group/perl.perl5.porters/2000/03/msg10341.html>
 
-    The dragon is withered,
-    His bones are now crumbled;
-    His armour is shivered,
-    His splendour is humbled!
-    Though sword shall be rusted,
-    And throne and crown perish
-    With strength that men trusted
-    And wealth that they cherish,
-    Here grass is still growing,
-    And leaves are a yet swinging,
-    The white water flowing,
-    And elves are yet singing
-        Come! Tra-la-la-lally!
-        Come back to the valley.
+  The dragon is withered,
+  His bones are now crumbled;
+  His armour is shivered,
+  His splendour is humbled!
+  Though sword shall be rusted,
+  And throne and crown perish
+  With strength that men trusted
+  And wealth that they cherish,
+  Here grass is still growing,
+  And leaves are a yet swinging,
+  The white water flowing,
+  And elves are yet singing
+      Come! Tra-la-la-lally!
+      Come back to the valley.
 
 =head2 v5.6.0-RC3 - no epigraph