This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
fixes for broken L<> links (from Wolfgang Laun
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 13 Mar 2000 21:40:23 +0000 (21:40 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 13 Mar 2000 21:40:23 +0000 (21:40 +0000)
<wolfgang.laun@alcatel.at>)

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@5715

12 files changed:
pod/Win32.pod
pod/perlcall.pod
pod/perlcompile.pod
pod/perldata.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlnumber.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlxstut.pod
vms/perlvms.pod

index 37c5cbd..44ed3d1 100644 (file)
@@ -92,8 +92,8 @@ between two backslashes) on this file system.
 =item Win32::FreeLibrary(HANDLE)
 
 [EXT] Unloads a previously loaded dynamic-link library. The HANDLE is
 =item Win32::FreeLibrary(HANDLE)
 
 [EXT] Unloads a previously loaded dynamic-link library. The HANDLE is
-no longer valid after this call. See L<LoadLibrary> for information on
-dynamically loading a library.
+no longer valid after this call. See L<LoadLibrary|Win32::LoadLibrary(LIBNAME)>
+for information on dynamically loading a library.
 
 =item Win32::GetArchName()
 
 
 =item Win32::GetArchName()
 
index 34f442a..148b24b 100644 (file)
@@ -1939,7 +1939,7 @@ done inside our C code:
 
 C<eval_pv> is used to compile the anonymous subroutine, which
 will be the return value as well (read more about C<eval_pv> in
 
 C<eval_pv> is used to compile the anonymous subroutine, which
 will be the return value as well (read more about C<eval_pv> in
-L<perlguts/eval_pv>).  Once this code reference is in hand, it
+L<perlapi/eval_pv>).  Once this code reference is in hand, it
 can be mixed in with all the previous examples we've shown.
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
 can be mixed in with all the previous examples we've shown.
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO
index 04dc019..8f31fc6 100644 (file)
@@ -103,9 +103,9 @@ This is why all the back ends print:
 
 before producing any other output.
 
 
 before producing any other output.
 
-=head2 The Cross Referencing Back End (B::Xref)
+=head2 The Cross Referencing Back End
 
 
-The cross referencing back end produces a report on your program,
+The cross referencing back end (B::Xref) produces a report on your program,
 breaking down declarations and uses of subroutines and variables (and
 formats) by file and subroutine.  For instance, here's part of the
 report from the I<pod2man> program that comes with Perl:
 breaking down declarations and uses of subroutines and variables (and
 formats) by file and subroutine.  For instance, here's part of the
 report from the I<pod2man> program that comes with Perl:
@@ -203,11 +203,11 @@ The B<-p> option adds parentheses where normally they are omitted:
 
 See L<B::Deparse> for more information on the formatting options.
 
 
 See L<B::Deparse> for more information on the formatting options.
 
-=head2 The Lint Back End (B::Lint)
+=head2 The Lint Back End
 
 
-The lint back end inspects programs for poor style.  One programmer's
-bad style is another programmer's useful tool, so options let you
-select what is complained about.
+The lint back end (B::Lint) inspects programs for poor style.  One
+programmer's bad style is another programmer's useful tool, so options
+let you select what is complained about.
 
 To run the style checker across your source code:
 
 
 To run the style checker across your source code:
 
index 96941bd..6ffd38c 100644 (file)
@@ -283,7 +283,7 @@ double-quoted string literals are subject to backslash and variable
 substitution; single-quoted strings are not (except for C<\'> and
 C<\\>).  The usual C-style backslash rules apply for making
 characters such as newline, tab, etc., as well as some more exotic
 substitution; single-quoted strings are not (except for C<\'> and
 C<\\>).  The usual C-style backslash rules apply for making
 characters such as newline, tab, etc., as well as some more exotic
-forms.  See L<perlop/"Quote and Quotelike Operators"> for a list.
+forms.  See L<perlop/"Quote and Quote-like Operators"> for a list.
 
 Hexadecimal, octal, or binary, representations in string literals
 (e.g. '0xff') are not automatically converted to their integer
 
 Hexadecimal, octal, or binary, representations in string literals
 (e.g. '0xff') are not automatically converted to their integer
index d51bf93..1ca7893 100644 (file)
@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@ Why do you want to do that? :-)
 
 If you want to override a predefined function, such as open(),
 then you'll have to import the new definition from a different
 
 If you want to override a predefined function, such as open(),
 then you'll have to import the new definition from a different
-module.  See L<perlsub/"Overriding Builtin Functions">.  There's
+module.  See L<perlsub/"Overriding Built-in Functions">.  There's
 also an example in L<perltoot/"Class::Template">.
 
 If you want to overload a Perl operator, such as C<+> or C<**>,
 also an example in L<perltoot/"Class::Template">.
 
 If you want to overload a Perl operator, such as C<+> or C<**>,
index e493081..ad20884 100644 (file)
@@ -2609,7 +2609,8 @@ C<'|'>, the filename is interpreted as a command which pipes output to
 us.  See L<perlipc/"Using open() for IPC">
 for more examples of this.  (You are not allowed to C<open> to a command
 that pipes both in I<and> out, but see L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>,
 us.  See L<perlipc/"Using open() for IPC">
 for more examples of this.  (You are not allowed to C<open> to a command
 that pipes both in I<and> out, but see L<IPC::Open2>, L<IPC::Open3>,
-and L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication"> for alternatives.)
+and L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process">
+for alternatives.)
 
 If MODE is C<'|-'>, the filename is interpreted as a
 command to which output is to be piped, and if MODE is
 
 If MODE is C<'|-'>, the filename is interpreted as a
 command to which output is to be piped, and if MODE is
index 6caed3e..2900b44 100644 (file)
@@ -398,14 +398,13 @@ you to stringify the keys (unlike the previous set of functions).
 
 They also return and accept whole hash entries (C<HE*>), making their
 use more efficient (since the hash number for a particular string
 
 They also return and accept whole hash entries (C<HE*>), making their
 use more efficient (since the hash number for a particular string
-doesn't have to be recomputed every time).  See L<API LISTING> later in
-this document for detailed descriptions.
+doesn't have to be recomputed every time).  See L<perlapi> for detailed
+descriptions.
 
 The following macros must always be used to access the contents of hash
 entries.  Note that the arguments to these macros must be simple
 variables, since they may get evaluated more than once.  See
 
 The following macros must always be used to access the contents of hash
 entries.  Note that the arguments to these macros must be simple
 variables, since they may get evaluated more than once.  See
-L<API LISTING> later in this document for detailed descriptions of these
-macros.
+L<perlapi> for detailed descriptions of these macros.
 
     HePV(HE* he, STRLEN len)
     HeVAL(HE* he)
 
     HePV(HE* he, STRLEN len)
     HeVAL(HE* he)
@@ -912,7 +911,7 @@ calling these functions, or by using one of the C<sv_set*_mg()> or
 C<sv_cat*_mg()> functions.  Similarly, generic C code must call the
 C<SvGETMAGIC()> macro to invoke any 'get' magic if they use an SV
 obtained from external sources in functions that don't handle magic.
 C<sv_cat*_mg()> functions.  Similarly, generic C code must call the
 C<SvGETMAGIC()> macro to invoke any 'get' magic if they use an SV
 obtained from external sources in functions that don't handle magic.
-L<API LISTING> later in this document identifies such functions.
+See L<perlapi> for a description of these functions.
 For example, calls to the C<sv_cat*()> functions typically need to be
 followed by C<SvSETMAGIC()>, but they don't need a prior C<SvGETMAGIC()>
 since their implementation handles 'get' magic.
 For example, calls to the C<sv_cat*()> functions typically need to be
 followed by C<SvSETMAGIC()>, but they don't need a prior C<SvGETMAGIC()>
 since their implementation handles 'get' magic.
index ea56e1e..be37385 100644 (file)
@@ -332,9 +332,9 @@ Second, if using the listed commands you see something B<exactly>
 (prefix matches do not count and case usually counts) like "En_US"
 without the quotes, then you should be okay because you are using a
 locale name that should be installed and available in your system.
 (prefix matches do not count and case usually counts) like "En_US"
 without the quotes, then you should be okay because you are using a
 locale name that should be installed and available in your system.
-In this case, see L<Permanently fixing system locale configuration>.
+In this case, see L<Permanently fixing your system's locale configuration>.
 
 
-=head2 Permanently fixing your locale configuration
+=head2 Permanently fixing your system's locale configuration
 
 This is when you see something like:
 
 
 This is when you see something like:
 
index c05b066..16d6421 100644 (file)
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ numbers.  (But realize that what we are discussing the rules for just the
 I<storage> of these numbers.  The fact that you can store such "large" numbers
 does not mean that that the I<operations> over these numbers will use all
 of the significant digits.
 I<storage> of these numbers.  The fact that you can store such "large" numbers
 does not mean that that the I<operations> over these numbers will use all
 of the significant digits.
-See L<"Numeric operations and numeric conversions"> for details.)
+See L<"Numeric operators and numeric conversions"> for details.)
 
 In fact numbers stored in the native integer format may be stored either
 in the signed native form, or in the unsigned native form.  Thus the limits
 
 In fact numbers stored in the native integer format may be stored either
 in the signed native form, or in the unsigned native form.  Thus the limits
index 1254948..db0563c 100644 (file)
@@ -1520,7 +1520,7 @@ terminator of a C<{}>-delimited construct.
 It is possible to inspect both the string given to RE engine and the
 resulting finite automaton.  See the arguments C<debug>/C<debugcolor>
 in the C<use L<re>> pragma, as well as Perl's B<-Dr> command-line
 It is possible to inspect both the string given to RE engine and the
 resulting finite automaton.  See the arguments C<debug>/C<debugcolor>
 in the C<use L<re>> pragma, as well as Perl's B<-Dr> command-line
-switch documented in L<perlrun/Switches>.
+switch documented in L<perlrun/"Command Switches">.
 
 =item Optimization of regular expressions
 
 
 =item Optimization of regular expressions
 
index 202aa57..d79f4b9 100644 (file)
@@ -906,7 +906,7 @@ to assist in making the interface between Perl and your extension simpler
 or easier to understand.  These routines should live in the .pm file.
 Whether they are automatically loaded when the extension itself is loaded
 or only loaded when called depends on where in the .pm file the subroutine
 or easier to understand.  These routines should live in the .pm file.
 Whether they are automatically loaded when the extension itself is loaded
 or only loaded when called depends on where in the .pm file the subroutine
-definition is placed.  You can also consult L<Autoloader> for an alternate
+definition is placed.  You can also consult L<AutoLoader> for an alternate
 way to store and load your extra subroutines.
 
 =head2 Documenting your Extension
 way to store and load your extra subroutines.
 
 =head2 Documenting your Extension
index 3883233..9b42b49 100644 (file)
@@ -859,8 +859,8 @@ it's equivalent to calling fflush() and fsync() from C.
 =head2 SDBM_File
 
 SDBM_File works peroperly on VMS. It has, however, one minor
 =head2 SDBM_File
 
 SDBM_File works peroperly on VMS. It has, however, one minor
-difference. The database directory file created has a L<.sdbm_dir>
-extension rather than a L<.dir> extension. L<.dir> files are VMS filesystem
+difference. The database directory file created has a F<.sdbm_dir>
+extension rather than a F<.dir> extension. F<.dir> files are VMS filesystem
 directory files, and using them for other purposes could cause unacceptable
 problems.
 
 directory files, and using them for other purposes could cause unacceptable
 problems.