This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
various pod nits (from Larry Virden and others)
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 24 Apr 2000 06:11:56 +0000 (06:11 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Mon, 24 Apr 2000 06:11:56 +0000 (06:11 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@5917

31 files changed:
README.amiga
README.hpux
README.machten
README.os2
README.os390
README.win32
embed.pl
handy.h
lib/IPC/Open3.pm
pod/Win32.pod
pod/perl56delta.pod
pod/perlapi.pod
pod/perlbook.pod
pod/perlcompile.pod
pod/perldebguts.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlfork.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlintern.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perlmod.pod
pod/perlmodinstall.pod
pod/perlnumber.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perltrap.pod
pod/perlunicode.pod
pod/perlvar.pod
pp.h

index c4bc6c5..8951f35 100644 (file)
@@ -4,10 +4,18 @@ specially designed to be readable as is.
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-perlamiga - Perl under Amiga OS
+perlamiga - Perl under Amiga OS (possibly very outdated information)
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
+NOTE: No one has reported building Perl on the Amiga in a long
+time.  The following information is highly unlikely to be correct.
+If you would like to help the Amiga port to stay current, see:
+
+    http://us.aminet.net/aminet/dirs/dev_gg.html
+
+for Amiga resources and information.
+
 One can read this document in the following formats:
 
        man perlamiga
index 4cdcf58..b5d1c0d 100644 (file)
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ If these dependent libraries are not listed at shared library creation
 time, you will get fatal "Unresolved symbol" errors at run time when the
 library is loaded.
 
-You may create a shared library that referers to another library, which
+You may create a shared library that refers to another library, which
 may be either an archive library or a shared library.  If it is a
 shared library, this is called a "dependent library".
 The dependent library's name is recorded in the main shared library,
index 4310bbc..8e14fc7 100644 (file)
@@ -57,25 +57,13 @@ and limited in its effect on practical Perl programs.
 
 =back
 
-=head2 Using external modules
-
-If warnings are enabled with Perl's C<-w> command-line flag, you are
-likely to see warnings when using external modules containing XS
-(compiled) code:
-
-  Subroutine DynaLoader::dl_error redefined at /usr/local/lib/perl5/5.6.0/powerpc-machten/DynaLoader.pm line 93.
-
-This is a harmless consequence of the static linking used for MachTen
-perl.  You can suppress the warnings by using the more modern
-C<-Mwarnings> instead of the traditional C<-w>.  (See L<perllexwarn>.)
-
 =head2 Building external modules
 
 To add an external module to perl, build in the normal way, which
 is documented in L<ExtUtils::MakeMaker>, or which can be driven
 automatically by the CPAN module (see L<CPAN>), which is part of the
-standard distribution.  If wou want to install a
-module contains XS code (C or C++ source which compiles to object code
+standard distribution.  If you want to install a module which
+contains XS code (C or C++ source which compiles to object code
 for linking with perl), you will have to replace your perl binary with
 a new version containing the new statically-linked object module.  The
 build process tells you how to do this.
@@ -98,4 +86,4 @@ Dominic Dunlop <domo@computer.org>
 
 =head1 DATE
 
-Version 1.0 2000-03-22
+Version 1.0.1 2000-03-27
index a69ea0d..1e7464b 100644 (file)
@@ -1481,7 +1481,7 @@ this works as well under DOS if you use DOS-enabled port of pdksh
 
 B<Disadvantages:> currently F<sh.exe> of pdksh calls external programs
 via fork()/exec(), and there is I<no> functioning exec() on
-OS/2. exec() is emulated by EMX by asyncroneous call while the caller
+OS/2. exec() is emulated by EMX by asynchronous call while the caller
 waits for child completion (to pretend that the C<pid> did not change). This
 means that 1 I<extra> copy of F<sh.exe> is made active via fork()/exec(),
 which may lead to some resources taken from the system (even if we do
@@ -1525,8 +1525,8 @@ as when processing B<-S> command-line switch.
 
 Perl uses its own malloc() under OS/2 - interpreters are usually malloc-bound
 for speed, but perl is not, since its malloc is lightning-fast.
-Perl-memory-usage-tuned benchmarks show that Perl's malloc is 5 times quickier
-than EMX one.  I do not have convincing data about memory footpring, but
+Perl-memory-usage-tuned benchmarks show that Perl's malloc is 5 times quicker
+than EMX one.  I do not have convincing data about memory footprint, but
 a (pretty random) benchmark showed that Perl one is 5% better.
 
 Combination of perl's malloc() and rigid DLL name resolution creates
index 5fcdfc0..1821846 100644 (file)
@@ -142,7 +142,7 @@ L<INSTALL>, L<perlport>, L<ExtUtils::MakeMaker>.
 
 The Perl Institute (http://www.perl.org/) maintains a perl-mvs 
 mailing list of interest to all folks building and/or
-using perl on EBCDIC platforms.  To subscibe, send a message of:
+using perl on EBCDIC platforms.  To subscribe, send a message of:
 
     subscribe perl-mvs
 
index ce798f9..66482b9 100644 (file)
@@ -127,6 +127,10 @@ Make sure you install the binaries that work with MSVCRT.DLL as indicated
 in the README for the GCC bundle.  You may need to set up a few environment
 variables (usually run from a batch file).
 
+The version of gcc-2.95.2-msvcrt.exe released 7 November 1999 left out
+a fix for certain command line quotes, so be sure to download and install
+fixes/quote-fix-msvcrt.exe too.
+
 You also need dmake.  See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.
 
 =back
index 593ab19..952b7b8 100755 (executable)
--- a/embed.pl
+++ b/embed.pl
@@ -1235,7 +1235,7 @@ perlintern - autogenerated documentation of purely B<internal>
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This file is the autogenerated documentation of functions in the 
-Perl intrepreter that are documented using Perl's internal documentation
+Perl interpreter that are documented using Perl's internal documentation
 format but are not marked as part of the Perl API. In other words, 
 B<they are not for use in extensions>!
 
@@ -1252,7 +1252,7 @@ print GUTS <<'END';
 
 =head1 AUTHORS
 
-The autodocumentation system was orignally added to the Perl core by 
+The autodocumentation system was originally added to the Perl core by 
 Benjamin Stuhl. Documentation is by whoever was kind enough to 
 document their functions.
 
diff --git a/handy.h b/handy.h
index 2c5d706..81f4745 100644 (file)
--- a/handy.h
+++ b/handy.h
@@ -260,18 +260,18 @@ C<strncmp>).
 
 /*
 =for apidoc Am|bool|isALNUM|char ch
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii alphanumeric
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII alphanumeric
 character or digit.
 
 =for apidoc Am|bool|isALPHA|char ch
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii alphabetic
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII alphabetic
 character.
 
 =for apidoc Am|bool|isSPACE|char ch
 Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is whitespace.
 
 =for apidoc Am|bool|isDIGIT|char ch
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII
 digit.
 
 =for apidoc Am|bool|isUPPER|char ch
@@ -524,7 +524,7 @@ The XSUB-writer's interface to the C C<memzero> function.  The C<dest> is the
 destination, C<nitems> is the number of items, and C<type> is the type.
 
 =for apidoc Am|void|StructCopy|type src|type dest|type
-This is an architecture-independant macro to copy one structure to another.
+This is an architecture-independent macro to copy one structure to another.
 
 =cut
 */
index 99709ac..46ebd68 100644 (file)
@@ -49,7 +49,7 @@ failure: it just raises an exception matching C</^open3:/>.  However,
 C<exec> failures in the child are not detected.  You'll have to 
 trap SIGPIPE yourself.
 
-open2() does not wait for and reap the child process after it exits.  
+open3() does not wait for and reap the child process after it exits.  
 Except for short programs where it's acceptable to let the operating system
 take care of this, you need to do this yourself.  This is normally as 
 simple as calling C<waitpid $pid, 0> when you're done with the process.
index 44ed3d1..bd1d065 100644 (file)
@@ -132,7 +132,7 @@ same value.
 
 =item Win32::GetLongPathName(PATHNAME)
 
-[CORE] Returns a representaion of PATHNAME composed of longname
+[CORE] Returns a representation of PATHNAME composed of longname
 components (if any).  The result may not necessarily be longer
 than PATHNAME.  No attempt is made to convert PATHNAME to the
 absolute path.  Compare with Win32::GetShortPathName and
index cec774b..1ca4d7e 100644 (file)
@@ -506,7 +506,7 @@ If the array is tied, the EXISTS() method in the corresponding tied
 package will be invoked.
 
 delete() may be used to remove an element from the array and return
-it.  The array element at that position returns to its unintialized
+it.  The array element at that position returns to its uninitialized
 state, so that testing for the same element with exists() will return
 false.  If the element happens to be the one at the end, the size of
 the array also shrinks up to the highest element that tests true for
@@ -780,7 +780,7 @@ under the Compiler, but there is still a significant way to
 go to achieve production quality compiled executables.
 
     NOTE: The Compiler suite remains highly experimental.  The
-    generated code may not be correct, even it manages to execute
+    generated code may not be correct, even when it manages to execute
     without errors.
 
 =item Benchmark
@@ -1007,7 +1007,7 @@ messages. For example:
 
     =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
-    B<This program> will read the given input file(s) and do someting
+    B<This program> will read the given input file(s) and do something
     useful with the contents thereof.
 
     =cut
@@ -1039,7 +1039,7 @@ IO::Socket::accept now uses select() instead of alarm() for doing
 timeouts.
 
 IO::Socket::INET->new now sets $! correctly on failure. $@ is
-still set for backwards compatability.
+still set for backwards compatibility.
 
 =item JPL
 
@@ -1582,7 +1582,7 @@ platform, but the possibility exists.
 =head2 VMS
 
 Numerous revisions and extensions to configuration, build, testing, and
-installation process to accomodate core changes and VMS-specific options.
+installation process to accommodate core changes and VMS-specific options.
 
 Expand %ENV-handling code to allow runtime mapping to logical names,
 CLI symbols, and CRTL environ array.
@@ -1695,7 +1695,7 @@ been fixed.
 
 =head2 All compilation errors are true errors
 
-Some "errors" encountered at compile time were by neccessity 
+Some "errors" encountered at compile time were by necessity 
 generated as warnings followed by eventual termination of the
 program.  This enabled more such errors to be reported in a
 single run, rather than causing a hard stop at the first error
@@ -2147,7 +2147,7 @@ L<perlport> for more on portability concerns.
 
 (W internal) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Perl tried to read the CRTL's internal
 environ array, and encountered an element without the C<=> delimiter
-used to spearate keys from values.  The element is ignored.
+used to separate keys from values.  The element is ignored.
 
 =item Ill-formed message in prime_env_iter: |%s|
 
@@ -2305,7 +2305,7 @@ could be a potential Year 2000 problem.
 
 =item pragma "attrs" is deprecated, use "sub NAME : ATTRS" instead
 
-(W deprecated) You have written somehing like this:
+(W deprecated) You have written something like this:
 
     sub doit
     {
index e0ae4cf..0109b27 100644 (file)
@@ -237,7 +237,7 @@ NOTE: the perl_ form of this function is deprecated.
 =item EXTEND
 
 Used to extend the argument stack for an XSUB's return values. Once
-used, guarrantees that there is room for at least C<nitems> to be pushed
+used, guarantees that there is room for at least C<nitems> to be pushed
 onto the stack.
 
        void    EXTEND(SP, int nitems)
@@ -662,21 +662,21 @@ Undefines the hash.
 
 =item isALNUM
 
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii alphanumeric
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII alphanumeric
 character or digit.
 
        bool    isALNUM(char ch)
 
 =item isALPHA
 
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii alphabetic
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII alphabetic
 character.
 
        bool    isALPHA(char ch)
 
 =item isDIGIT
 
-Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ascii
+Returns a boolean indicating whether the C C<char> is an ASCII
 digit.
 
        bool    isDIGIT(char ch)
@@ -1263,7 +1263,7 @@ wrapper for C<strncmp>).
 
 =item StructCopy
 
-This is an architecture-independant macro to copy one structure to another.
+This is an architecture-independent macro to copy one structure to another.
 
        void    StructCopy(type src, type dest, type)
 
index 3a693dd..1b322fb 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ by Larry Wall et al, is the definitive reference work covering nearly
 all of Perl.  You can order it and other Perl books from O'Reilly &
 Associates, 1-800-998-9938.  Local/overseas is +1 707 829 0515.  If you
 can locate an O'Reilly order form, you can also fax to +1 707 829 0104.
-If you're web-connected, you can even mosey on over to http://www.ora.com/
+If you're web-connected, you can even mosey on over to http://www.oreilly.com/
 for an online order form.
 
 Other Perl books from various publishers and authors 
index 697cb80..e5544ec 100644 (file)
@@ -308,7 +308,7 @@ I<assemble> program that produces bytecode.
 
 This module is used by the B::CC back end.  It walks "basic blocks".
 A basic block is a series of operations which is known to execute from
-start to finish, with no possiblity of branching or halting.
+start to finish, with no possibility of branching or halting.
 
 =item B::Bytecode
 
@@ -369,12 +369,12 @@ can identify.  See L</"The Lint Back End"> for details about usage.
 =item B::Showlex
 
 This module prints out the my() variables used in a function or a
-file.  To gt a list of the my() variables used in the subroutine
+file.  To get a list of the my() variables used in the subroutine
 mysub() defined in the file myperlprogram:
 
   $ perl -MO=Showlex,mysub myperlprogram
 
-To gt a list of the my() variables used in the file myperlprogram:
+To get a list of the my() variables used in the file myperlprogram:
 
   $ perl -MO=Showlex myperlprogram
 
@@ -419,7 +419,7 @@ names.
 
 The optimized C backend outputs code for more modules than it should
 (e.g., DirHandle).  It also has little hope of properly handling
-C<goto LABEL> outside the running subroutine (C<goto &sub> is ok).
+C<goto LABEL> outside the running subroutine (C<goto &sub> is okay).
 C<goto LABEL> currently does not work at all in this backend.
 It also creates a huge initialization function that gives
 C compilers headaches.  Splitting the initialization function gives
index b74f3ef..2bf6ea4 100644 (file)
@@ -13,8 +13,8 @@ intimate with Perl's guts to understand.  Caveat lector.
 
 Perl has special debugging hooks at compile-time and run-time used
 to create debugging environments.  These hooks are not to be confused
-with the I<perl -Dxxx> command described in L<perlrun>, which are
-usable only if a special Perl built per the instructions the
+with the I<perl -Dxxx> command described in L<perlrun>, which is
+usable only if a special Perl is built per the instructions in the
 F<INSTALL> podpage in the Perl source tree.
 
 For example, whenever you call Perl's built-in C<caller> function
@@ -630,7 +630,7 @@ Perl is a profligate wastrel when it comes to memory use.  There
 is a saying that to estimate memory usage of Perl, assume a reasonable
 algorithm for memory allocation, multiply that estimate by 10, and
 while you still may miss the mark, at least you won't be quite so
-astonished.  This is not absolutely true, but may prvide a good
+astonished.  This is not absolutely true, but may provide a good
 grasp of what happens.
 
 Assume that an integer cannot take less than 20 bytes of memory, a
@@ -666,7 +666,7 @@ the top level of the Perl source tree.
 
 If your perl is using Perl's malloc() and was compiled with the
 necessary switches (this is the default), then it will print memory
-usage statistics after compiling your code hwen C<< $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}
+usage statistics after compiling your code when C<< $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS}
 > 1 >>, and before termination of the program when C<<
 $ENV{PERL_DEBUG_MSTATS} >= 1 >>.  The report format is similar to
 the following example:
@@ -720,7 +720,7 @@ of two--or possibly one page greater.  In the second row, if present,
 the memory footprints of the buckets are between the memory footprints
 of two buckets "above".
 
-For example, suppose under the pervious example, the memory footprints
+For example, suppose under the previous example, the memory footprints
 were
 
      free:    8     16    32    64    128  256 512 1024 2048 4096 8192
@@ -804,7 +804,7 @@ To see this list, insert two C<warn('!...')> statements around the call:
   do 'lib/auto/POSIX/autosplit.ix';
   warn('!!! "after"');
 
-and run it with PErl's B<-DL> option.  The first warn() will print
+and run it with Perl's B<-DL> option.  The first warn() will print
 memory allocation info before parsing the file and will memorize
 the statistics at this point (we ignore what it prints).  The second
 warn() prints increments with respect to these memorized data.  This
@@ -842,7 +842,7 @@ Here are explanations for other I<Id>s above:
 
 =item C<717> 
 
-CReates bigger C<XPV*> structures.  In the case above, it
+Creates bigger C<XPV*> structures.  In the case above, it
 creates 3 C<AV>s per subroutine, one for a list of lexical variable
 names, one for a scratchpad (which contains lexical variables and
 C<targets>), and one for the array of scratchpads needed for
index 9ed7552..f559645 100644 (file)
@@ -1610,7 +1610,7 @@ versions of Perl are likely to eliminate these arbitrary limitations.
 
 (W internal) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Perl tried to read the CRTL's internal
 environ array, and encountered an element without the C<=> delimiter
-used to spearate keys from values.  The element is ignored.
+used to separate keys from values.  The element is ignored.
 
 =item Ill-formed message in prime_env_iter: |%s|
 
@@ -2518,7 +2518,7 @@ Perl assumes that memory is now corrupted.  See L<perlfunc/ioctl>.
 
 =item pragma "attrs" is deprecated, use "sub NAME : ATTRS" instead
 
-(W deprecated) You have written somehing like this:
+(W deprecated) You have written something like this:
 
     sub doit
     {
@@ -2870,7 +2870,7 @@ repetitions of "xyz" is C</abc(?=(?:xyz){3})/>, not C</abc(?=xyz){3}/>.
 =item Stub found while resolving method `%s' overloading `%s' in package `%s'
 
 (P) Overloading resolution over @ISA tree may be broken by importation stubs.
-Stubs should never be implicitely created, but explicit calls to C<can>
+Stubs should never be implicitly created, but explicit calls to C<can>
 may break this.
 
 =item Subroutine %s redefined
index d930e93..a3dbf08 100644 (file)
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ pseudo-processes are launched after others have been wait()-ed on.
 
 =item %ENV
 
-Each pseudo-process maintains its own virtual enviroment.  Modifications
+Each pseudo-process maintains its own virtual environment.  Modifications
 to %ENV affect the virtual environment, and are only visible within that
 pseudo-process, and in any processes (or pseudo-processes) launched from
 it.
index b973a15..6521f6e 100644 (file)
@@ -146,11 +146,11 @@ C<goto>, C<last>, C<next>, C<redo>, C<return>, C<sub>, C<wantarray>
 
 =item Keywords related to scoping
 
-C<caller>, C<import>, C<local>, C<my>, C<package>, C<use>
+C<caller>, C<import>, C<local>, C<my>, C<our>, C<package>, C<use>
 
 =item Miscellaneous functions
 
-C<defined>, C<dump>, C<eval>, C<formline>, C<local>, C<my>, C<reset>,
+C<defined>, C<dump>, C<eval>, C<formline>, C<local>, C<my>, C<our>, C<reset>,
 C<scalar>, C<undef>, C<wantarray>
 
 =item Functions for processes and process groups
@@ -200,8 +200,8 @@ C<gmtime>, C<localtime>, C<time>, C<times>
 =item Functions new in perl5
 
 C<abs>, C<bless>, C<chomp>, C<chr>, C<exists>, C<formline>, C<glob>,
-C<import>, C<lc>, C<lcfirst>, C<map>, C<my>, C<no>, C<prototype>, C<qx>,
-C<qw>, C<readline>, C<readpipe>, C<ref>, C<sub*>, C<sysopen>, C<tie>,
+C<import>, C<lc>, C<lcfirst>, C<map>, C<my>, C<no>, C<our>, C<prototype>, 
+C<qx>, C<qw>, C<readline>, C<readpipe>, C<ref>, C<sub*>, C<sysopen>, C<tie>,
 C<tied>, C<uc>, C<ucfirst>, C<untie>, C<use>
 
 * - C<sub> was a keyword in perl4, but in perl5 it is an
@@ -488,7 +488,7 @@ files, but it can be disastrous for binary files.
 Another consequence of using binmode() (on some systems) is that
 special end-of-file markers will be seen as part of the data stream.
 For systems from the Microsoft family this means that if your binary
-data contains C<\cZ>, the I/O subsystem will ragard it as the end of
+data contains C<\cZ>, the I/O subsystem will regard it as the end of
 the file, unless you use binmode().
 
 binmode() is not only important for readline() and print() operations,
@@ -1055,7 +1055,7 @@ If C<$@> is empty then the string C<"Died"> is used.
 die() can also be called with a reference argument.  If this happens to be
 trapped within an eval(), $@ contains the reference.  This behavior permits
 a more elaborate exception handling implementation using objects that
-maintain arbitary state about the nature of the exception.  Such a scheme
+maintain arbitrary state about the nature of the exception.  Such a scheme
 is sometimes preferable to matching particular string values of $@ using
 regular expressions.  Here's an example:
 
@@ -2923,7 +2923,7 @@ sequence of characters that give the order and type of values, as
 follows:
 
     a  A string with arbitrary binary data, will be null padded.
-    A  An ascii string, will be space padded.
+    A  An ASCII string, will be space padded.
     Z  A null terminated (asciz) string, will be null padded.
 
     b  A bit string (ascending bit order inside each byte, like vec()).
@@ -3996,7 +3996,7 @@ C<@ARGV> array at file scopes or within the lexical scopes established by
 the C<eval ''>, C<BEGIN {}>, C<INIT {}>, C<CHECK {}>, and C<END {}>
 constructs.
 
-See also C<unshift>, C<push>, and C<pop>.  C<Shift()> and C<unshift> do the
+See also C<unshift>, C<push>, and C<pop>.  C<shift()> and C<unshift> do the
 same thing to the left end of an array that C<pop> and C<push> do to the
 right end.
 
@@ -4654,7 +4654,7 @@ The commonly available S_IF* constants are
 
 and the S_IF* functions are
 
-    S_IFMODE($mode)    the part of $mode containg the permission bits
+    S_IFMODE($mode)    the part of $mode containing the permission bits
                        and the setuid/setgid/sticky bits
 
     S_IFMT($mode)      the part of $mode containing the file type
index 2900b44..7b7b07e 100644 (file)
@@ -1559,8 +1559,8 @@ which will be private.  All functions whose names begin C<S_> are private
 "Perl_", but just because a function begins with "Perl_" does not mean it is
 part of the API. The easiest way to be B<sure> a function is part of the API
 is to find its entry in L<perlapi>.  If it exists in L<perlapi>, it's part
-of the API.  If it doesn't, and you think it should be (i.e., you need it fo
-your extension), send mail via L<perlbug> explaining why you think it
+of the API.  If it doesn't, and you think it should be (i.e., you need it for
+your extension), send mail via L<perlbug> explaining why you think it
 should be.
 
 (L<perlapi> itself is generated by embed.pl, a Perl script that generates
@@ -1668,7 +1668,7 @@ Thus, something like:
 
         sv_setsv(asv, bsv);
 
-in your extesion will translate to this when PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT is
+in your extension will translate to this when PERL_IMPLICIT_CONTEXT is
 in effect:
 
         Perl_sv_setsv(Perl_get_context(), asv, bsv);
index 58eeac6..b0aab33 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ perlintern - autogenerated documentation of purely B<internal>
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This file is the autogenerated documentation of functions in the 
-Perl intrepreter that are documented using Perl's internal documentation
+Perl interpreter that are documented using Perl's internal documentation
 format but are not marked as part of the Perl API. In other words, 
 B<they are not for use in extensions>!
 
@@ -16,7 +16,7 @@ B<they are not for use in extensions>!
 
 =head1 AUTHORS
 
-The autodocumentation system was orignally added to the Perl core by 
+The autodocumentation system was originally added to the Perl core by 
 Benjamin Stuhl. Documentation is by whoever was kind enough to 
 document their functions.
 
index 8760257..5b12fbe 100644 (file)
@@ -1022,7 +1022,7 @@ something to the server before fetching the server's response.
     }
 
 The web server handing the "http" service, which is assumed to be at
-its standard port, number 80.  If your the web server you're trying to
+its standard port, number 80.  If the web server you're trying to
 connect to is at a different port (like 1080 or 8080), you should specify
 as the named-parameter pair, C<< PeerPort => 8080 >>.  The C<autoflush>
 method is used on the socket because otherwise the system would buffer
index 63324a4..bbafbfb 100644 (file)
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ table lookups at compile time:
     local $main::{foo}  = $main::{bar};
 
 You can use this to print out all the variables in a package, for
-instance.  The standard but antequated F<dumpvar.pl> library and
+instance.  The standard but antiquated F<dumpvar.pl> library and
 the CPAN module Devel::Symdump make use of this.
 
 Assignment to a typeglob performs an aliasing operation, i.e.,
@@ -251,10 +251,10 @@ LIFO order.  C<CHECK> blocks are again useful in the Perl compiler
 suite to save the compiled state of the program.
 
 When you use the B<-n> and B<-p> switches to Perl, C<BEGIN> and
-C<END> work just as they do in B<awk>, as a degenerate case.  As currently
-implemented (and subject to change, since its inconvenient at best),
-both C<BEGIN> and<END> blocks are run when you use the B<-c> switch
-for a compile-only syntax check, although your main code is not.
+C<END> work just as they do in B<awk>, as a degenerate case.
+Both C<BEGIN> and C<CHECK> blocks are run when you use the B<-c>
+switch for a compile-only syntax check, although your main code
+is not.
 
 =head2 Perl Classes
 
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ providing a mechanism for exporting some of its symbols into the
 symbol table of any package using it.  Or it may function as a class
 definition and make its semantics available implicitly through
 method calls on the class and its objects, without explicitly
-exportating anything.  Or it can do a little of both.
+exporting anything.  Or it can do a little of both.
 
 For example, to start a traditional, non-OO module called Some::Module,
 create a file called F<Some/Module.pm> and start with this template:
index 19ffac9..57f62a5 100644 (file)
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ A. DECOMPRESS
 In general, all Macintosh decompression utilities mentioned here
 can be found in the Info-Mac Hyperarchive
 ( http://hyperarchive.lcs.mit.edu/HyperArchive.html ).
-Specificly the "Commpress & Translate" listing
+Specifically the "Compress & Translate" listing
 ( http://hyperarchive.lcs.mit.edu/HyperArchive/Abstracts/cmp/HyperArchive.html ).
 
 
index c83e053..498d962 100644 (file)
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ the maximal and the minimal supported true integral quantities are close to
 powers of 2.  However, "native" floats have a most fundamental
 restriction: they may represent only those numbers which have a relatively
 "short" representation when converted to a binary fraction.  For example,
-0.9 cannot be respresented by a native float, since the binary fraction
+0.9 cannot be represented by a native float, since the binary fraction
 for 0.9 is infinite:
 
   binary0.1110011001100...
index ce6fb66..d847c99 100644 (file)
@@ -1412,7 +1412,7 @@ as C<"\\\t"> (since TAB is not alphanumeric).  Note also that:
 may be closer to the conjectural I<intention> of the writer of C<"\Q\t\E">.
 
 Interpolated scalars and arrays are converted internally to the C<join> and
-C<.> catentation operations.  Thus, C<"$foo XXX '@arr'"> becomes:
+C<.> catenation operations.  Thus, C<"$foo XXX '@arr'"> becomes:
 
   $foo . " XXX '" . (join $", @arr) . "'";
 
index 8966097..7f779c9 100644 (file)
@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@ If you need to distinguish between endian architectures you could use
 either of the variables set like so:
 
     $is_big_endian   = unpack("h*", pack("s", 1)) =~ /01/;
-    $is_litte_endian = unpack("h*", pack("s", 1)) =~ /^1/;
+    $is_little_endian = unpack("h*", pack("s", 1)) =~ /^1/;
 
 Differing widths can cause truncation even between platforms of equal
 endianness.  The platform of shorter width loses the upper parts of the
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ So, it is reasonably safe to assume that all platforms support the
 notion of a "path" to uniquely identify a file on the system.  How
 that path is really written, though, differs considerably.
 
-Atlhough similar, file path specifications differ between Unix,
+Although similar, file path specifications differ between Unix,
 Windows, S<Mac OS>, OS/2, VMS, VOS, S<RISC OS>, and probably others.
 Unix, for example, is one of the few OSes that has the elegant idea
 of a single root directory.
@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ Commands that launch external processes are generally supported on
 most platforms (though many of them do not support any type of
 forking).  The problem with using them arises from what you invoke
 them on.  External tools are often named differently on different
-platforms, may not be available in the same location, migth accept
+platforms, may not be available in the same location, might accept
 different arguments, can behave differently, and often present their
 results in a platform-dependent way.  Thus, you should seldom depend
 on them to produce consistent results. (Then again, if you're calling 
index e1f30a3..2db4139 100644 (file)
@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ The "grab all you can, and do not give anything back" semantic is desirable
 in many situations where on the first sight a simple C<()*> looks like
 the correct solution.  Suppose we parse text with comments being delimited
 by C<#> followed by some optional (horizontal) whitespace.  Contrary to
-its appearence, C<#[ \t]*> I<is not> the correct subexpression to match
+its appearance, C<#[ \t]*> I<is not> the correct subexpression to match
 the comment delimiter, because it may "give up" some whitespace if
 the remainder of the pattern can be made to match that way.  The correct
 answer is either one of these:
index 261a20f..f82067e 100644 (file)
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ Everything else.
 =back
 
 If you find an example of a conversion trap that is not listed here,
-please submit it to Bill Middleton <F<wjm@best.com>> for inclusion.
+please submit it to <F<perlbug@perl.org>> for inclusion.
 Also note that at least some of these can be caught with the
 C<use warnings> pragma or the B<-w> switch.
 
index 5333ac4..c686661 100644 (file)
@@ -114,13 +114,7 @@ will typically occur directly within the literal strings as UTF-8
 characters, but you can also specify a particular character with an
 extension of the C<\x> notation.  UTF-8 characters are specified by
 putting the hexadecimal code within curlies after the C<\x>.  For instance,
-a Unicode smiley face is C<\x{263A}>.  A character in the Latin-1 range
-(128..255) should be written C<\x{ab}> rather than C<\xab>, since the
-former will turn into a two-byte UTF-8 code, while the latter will
-continue to be interpreted as generating a 8-bit byte rather than a
-character.  In fact, if the C<use warnings> pragma of the C<-w> switch
-is turned on, it will produce a warning
-that you might be generating invalid UTF-8.
+a Unicode smiley face is C<\x{263A}>.
 
 =item *
 
index 04fb3fe..8b025c5 100644 (file)
@@ -439,17 +439,17 @@ After a match against some variable $var:
 
 =over 5
 
-=item C<$`> is the same as C<substr($var, 0, $-[0]>)
+=item C<$`> is the same as C<substr($var, 0, $-[0])>
 
-=item C<$&> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[0], $+[0] - $-[0]>) 
+=item C<$&> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[0], $+[0] - $-[0])>
 
-=item C<$'> is the same as C<substr($var, $+[0]>)
+=item C<$'> is the same as C<substr($var, $+[0])>
 
 =item C<$1> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[1], $+[1] - $-[1])>  
 
 =item C<$2> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[2], $+[2] - $-[2])>
 
-=item C<$3> is the same as C<substr $var, $-[3], $+[3] - $-[3]>) 
+=item C<$3> is the same as C<substr $var, $-[3], $+[3] - $-[3])>
 
 =back
 
diff --git a/pp.h b/pp.h
index bdc0b1a..7f396b2 100644 (file)
--- a/pp.h
+++ b/pp.h
@@ -143,7 +143,7 @@ Pops a long off the stack.
 /*
 =for apidoc Am|void|EXTEND|SP|int nitems
 Used to extend the argument stack for an XSUB's return values. Once
-used, guarrantees that there is room for at least C<nitems> to be pushed
+used, guarantees that there is room for at least C<nitems> to be pushed
 onto the stack.
 
 =for apidoc Am|void|PUSHs|SV* sv