This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Small doc tweaks.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Fri, 11 Jan 2002 02:11:21 +0000 (02:11 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Fri, 11 Jan 2002 02:11:21 +0000 (02:11 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@14176

pod/perluniintro.pod

index 68f8a01..14b0cd3 100644 (file)
@@ -518,19 +518,20 @@ http://www.unicode.org/unicode/reports/tr10/
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
-Character Ranges
+Character Ranges and Classes
 
 Character ranges in regular expression character classes (C</[a-z]/>)
 and in the C<tr///> (also known as C<y///>) operator are not magically
 Unicode-aware.  What this means that C<[A-Za-z]> will not magically start
 to mean "all alphabetic letters" (not that it does mean that even for
 
 Character ranges in regular expression character classes (C</[a-z]/>)
 and in the C<tr///> (also known as C<y///>) operator are not magically
 Unicode-aware.  What this means that C<[A-Za-z]> will not magically start
 to mean "all alphabetic letters" (not that it does mean that even for
-8-bit characters, you should be using C</[[:alpha]]/> for that).
+8-bit characters, you should be using C</[[:alpha:]]/> for that).
 
 For specifying things like that in regular expressions, you can use
 the various Unicode properties, C<\pL> or perhaps C<\p{Alphabetic}>,
 in this particular case.  You can use Unicode code points as the end
 points of character ranges, but that means that particular code point
 
 For specifying things like that in regular expressions, you can use
 the various Unicode properties, C<\pL> or perhaps C<\p{Alphabetic}>,
 in this particular case.  You can use Unicode code points as the end
 points of character ranges, but that means that particular code point
-range, nothing more.  For further information, see L<perlunicode>.
+range, nothing more.  For further information (there are dozens
+of Unicode character classes), see L<perlunicode>.
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *