This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Typo fix and slight rewording.
authorJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Tue, 4 Sep 2001 12:09:43 +0000 (12:09 +0000)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Tue, 4 Sep 2001 12:09:43 +0000 (12:09 +0000)
p4raw-id: //depot/perl@11856

pod/perlfunc.pod

index ebac4b7..ed144d1 100644 (file)
@@ -4799,14 +4799,14 @@ Sets the random number seed for the C<rand> operator.
 
 It's usually not necessary to call C<srand> at all, because if it is
 not called explicitly, it is called implicitly at the first use of the
-C<rand> operator.  However, this was not the case in version of Perl
+C<rand> operator.  However, this was not the case in versions of Perl
 before 5.004, so if your script will run under older Perl versions, it
 should call C<srand>.
 
 The point of the function is to "seed" the C<rand> function so that
 C<rand> can produce a different sequence each time you run your
 program.  Just do it B<once> at the top of your program, or you
-I<won't> get random numbers out of C<rand>!
+I<won't> get random numbers out of C<rand>.
 
 If EXPR is omitted, uses a semi-random value supplied by the kernel
 (if it supports the F</dev/urandom> device) or based on the current
@@ -4823,8 +4823,8 @@ Calling C<srand> multiple times is highly suspect.
 
 =item *
 
-Do B<not> call srand() (i.e. without an argument) more than once in a
-script.  The internal state of the random number generator should
+Do B<not> call srand() (i.e. without an argument) more than once in
+script.  The internal state of the random number generator should
 contain more entropy than can be provided by any seed, so calling
 srand() again actually I<loses> randomness.  And you shouldn't use
 srand() at all unless you need backward compatibility with Perls older
@@ -4833,9 +4833,11 @@ than 5.004.
 =item *
 
 Do B<not> call srand($seed) (i.e. with an argument) multiple times in
-a script I<unless> you know exactly what you're doing and why you're
-doing it.  Usually this requires intimate knowledge of the
-implementation of srand() and rand() on your platform.
+a script for any other purpose than calling it with the I<same>
+argument to produce the I<same> sequence out of rand() I<unless> you
+know exactly what you're doing and why you're doing it.  Usually doing
+anything else than reusing the same seed requires intimate knowledge of
+the implementation of srand() and rand() on your platform.
 
 =back