This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
bump Filter::Util::Call to CPAN version 1.44
authorJesse Luehrs <doy@tozt.net>
Mon, 18 Jun 2012 22:03:26 +0000 (17:03 -0500)
committerJesse Luehrs <doy@tozt.net>
Mon, 18 Jun 2012 22:10:26 +0000 (17:10 -0500)
Porting/Maintainers.pl
cpan/Filter-Util-Call/Call.pm
cpan/Filter-Util-Call/Call.xs
cpan/Filter-Util-Call/t/call.t
pod/perlfilter.pod

index eea80af..f015523 100755 (executable)
@@ -883,7 +883,7 @@ use File::Glob qw(:case);
 
     'Filter::Util::Call' => {
         'MAINTAINER'   => 'pmqs',
-        'DISTRIBUTION' => 'RURBAN/Filter-1.40.tar.gz',
+        'DISTRIBUTION' => 'RURBAN/Filter-1.44.tar.gz',
         'FILES'        => q[cpan/Filter-Util-Call
                  pod/perlfilter.pod
                 ],
index a502575..5c8c16a 100644 (file)
@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@ use vars qw($VERSION @ISA @EXPORT) ;
 
 @ISA = qw(Exporter DynaLoader);
 @EXPORT = qw( filter_add filter_del filter_read filter_read_exact) ;
-$VERSION = "1.40" ;
+$VERSION = "1.44" ;
 
 sub filter_read_exact($)
 {
index 69f677d..a6a8262 100644 (file)
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
  * 
  * Author   : Paul Marquess 
  * Date     : 24th April 2011
- * Version  : 1.40
+ * Version  : 1.43
  *
  *    Copyright (c) 1995-2011 Paul Marquess. All rights reserved.
  *       This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
index 5fa7e38..b01a143 100644 (file)
@@ -786,7 +786,7 @@ EOM
 {
 
 # no without use
-# see Message-ID: <20021106212427.A15377@ttul.org>
+# see Message-ID: <2002110621.427.A15377@ttul.org>
 ####################
 
 writeFile("${module6}.pm", <<EOM);
index 2706188..f96fe66 100644 (file)
@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ source filter (see Decryption Filters, below).
 
 All decryption filters work on the principle of "security through
 obscurity." Regardless of how well you write a decryption filter and
-how strong your encryption algorithm is, anyone determined enough can
+how strong your encryption algorithm, anyone determined enough can
 retrieve the original source code. The reason is quite simple - once
 the decryption filter has decrypted the source back to its original
 form, fragments of it will be stored in the computer's memory as Perl
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ difficult for the potential cracker. The most important: Write your
 decryption filter in C and statically link the decryption module into
 the Perl binary. For further tips to make life difficult for the
 potential cracker, see the file I<decrypt.pm> in the source filters
-distribution.
+module.
 
 =back
 
@@ -226,7 +226,7 @@ distribution.
 An alternative to writing the filter in C is to create a separate
 executable in the language of your choice. The separate executable
 reads from standard input, does whatever processing is necessary, and
-writes the filtered data to standard output. C<Filter::cpp> is an
+writes the filtered data to standard output. C<Filter:cpp> is an
 example of a source filter implemented as a separate executable - the
 executable is the C preprocessor bundled with your C compiler.
 
@@ -234,7 +234,7 @@ The source filter distribution includes two modules that simplify this
 task: C<Filter::exec> and C<Filter::sh>. Both allow you to run any
 external executable. Both use a coprocess to control the flow of data
 into and out of the external executable. (For details on coprocesses,
-see Stephens, W.R., "Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment."
+see Stephens, W.R. "Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment."
 Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-210-56317-7, pages 441-445.) The difference
 between them is that C<Filter::exec> spawns the external command
 directly, while C<Filter::sh> spawns a shell to execute the external
@@ -388,9 +388,9 @@ Two special marker lines will bracket debugging code, like this:
     }
     ## DEBUG_END
 
-The filter ensures that Perl parses the code between the <DEBUG_BEGIN>
-and C<DEBUG_END> markers only when the C<DEBUG> environment variable
-exists. That means that when C<DEBUG> does exist, the code above
+When the C<DEBUG> environment variable exists, the filter ensures that
+Perl parses only the code between the C<DEBUG_BEGIN> and C<DEBUG_END>
+markers. That means that when C<DEBUG> does exist, the code above
 should be passed through the filter unchanged. The marker lines can
 also be passed through as-is, because the Perl parser will see them as
 comment lines. When C<DEBUG> isn't set, we need a way to disable the