This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
typo fixes for Locale::Maketext
authorDavid Steinbrunner <dsteinbrunner@pobox.com>
Tue, 21 May 2013 11:12:24 +0000 (07:12 -0400)
committerJames E Keenan <jkeenan@cpan.org>
Sat, 25 May 2013 03:21:11 +0000 (05:21 +0200)
dist/Locale-Maketext/lib/Locale/Maketext.pm
dist/Locale-Maketext/lib/Locale/Maketext/TPJ13.pod

index 63e5fba..9225da3 100644 (file)
@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ sub maketext {
     my($handle, $phrase) = splice(@_,0,2);
     Carp::confess('No handle/phrase') unless (defined($handle) && defined($phrase));
 
-    # backup $@ in case it it's still being used in the calling code.
+    # backup $@ in case it's still being used in the calling code.
     # If no failures, we'll re-set it back to what it was later.
     my $at = $@;
 
@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ sub _langtag_munging {
     my($base_class, @languages) = @_;
 
     # We have all these DEBUG statements because otherwise it's hard as hell
-    # to diagnose ifwhen something goes wrong.
+    # to diagnose if/when something goes wrong.
 
     DEBUG and warn 'Lgs1: ', map("<$_>", @languages), "\n";
 
index b9586b2..8d3eae6 100644 (file)
@@ -715,7 +715,7 @@ right tool for the job.
 However, other accidents of history have made Perl a well-accepted
 language for design of server-side programs (generally in CGI form)
 for Web site interfaces.  Localization of static pages in Web sites is
-trivial, feasable either with simple language-negotiation features in
+trivial, feasible either with simple language-negotiation features in
 servers like Apache, or with some kind of server-side inclusions of
 language-appropriate text into layout templates.  However, I think
 that the localization of Perl-based search systems (or other kinds of