This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
perlport: #109408
authorBrian Fraser <fraserbn@gmail.com>
Wed, 1 Feb 2012 02:39:52 +0000 (23:39 -0300)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Wed, 27 Jun 2012 15:46:32 +0000 (08:46 -0700)
pod/perlport.pod

index 867b66e..3e50873 100644 (file)
@@ -212,7 +212,7 @@ them in big-endian mode.  To avoid this problem in network (socket)
 connections use the C<pack> and C<unpack> formats C<n> and C<N>, the
 "network" orders.  These are guaranteed to be portable.
 
 connections use the C<pack> and C<unpack> formats C<n> and C<N>, the
 "network" orders.  These are guaranteed to be portable.
 
-As of perl 5.9.2, you can also use the C<E<gt>> and C<E<lt>> modifiers
+As of perl 5.10.0, you can also use the C<E<gt>> and C<E<lt>> modifiers
 to force big- or little-endian byte-order.  This is useful if you want
 to store signed integers or 64-bit integers, for example.
 
 to force big- or little-endian byte-order.  This is useful if you want
 to store signed integers or 64-bit integers, for example.
 
@@ -236,9 +236,9 @@ transferring or storing raw binary numbers.
 
 One can circumnavigate both these problems in two ways.  Either
 transfer and store numbers always in text format, instead of raw
 
 One can circumnavigate both these problems in two ways.  Either
 transfer and store numbers always in text format, instead of raw
-binary, or else consider using modules like Data::Dumper (included in
-the standard distribution as of Perl 5.005) and Storable (included as
-of perl 5.8).  Keeping all data as text significantly simplifies matters.
+binary, or else consider using modules like Data::Dumper and Storable
+(included as of perl 5.8).  Keeping all data as text significantly
+simplifies matters.
 
 The v-strings are portable only up to v2147483647 (0x7FFFFFFF), that's
 how far EBCDIC, or more precisely UTF-EBCDIC will go.
 
 The v-strings are portable only up to v2147483647 (0x7FFFFFFF), that's
 how far EBCDIC, or more precisely UTF-EBCDIC will go.
@@ -679,9 +679,8 @@ ISO 8859-1 bytes beyond 0x7f into your strings might cause trouble
 later.  If the bytes are native 8-bit bytes, you can use the C<bytes>
 pragma.  If the bytes are in a string (regular expression being a
 curious string), you can often also use the C<\xHH> notation instead
 later.  If the bytes are native 8-bit bytes, you can use the C<bytes>
 pragma.  If the bytes are in a string (regular expression being a
 curious string), you can often also use the C<\xHH> notation instead
-of embedding the bytes as-is.  (If you want to write your code in UTF-8,
-you can use the C<utf8>.) The C<bytes> and C<utf8> pragmata are
-available since Perl 5.6.0.
+of embedding the bytes as-is.  If you want to write your code in UTF-8,
+you can use the C<utf8>.
 
 =head2 System Resources
 
 
 =head2 System Resources
 
@@ -777,8 +776,8 @@ Testing results: L<http://www.cpantesters.org/>
 
 =head1 PLATFORMS
 
 
 =head1 PLATFORMS
 
-As of version 5.002, Perl is built with a C<$^O> variable that
-indicates the operating system it was built on.  This was implemented
+Perl is built with a C<$^O> variable that indicates the operating
+system it was built on.  This was implemented
 to help speed up code that would otherwise have to C<use Config>
 and use the value of C<$Config{osname}>.  Of course, to get more
 detailed information about the system, looking into C<%Config> is
 to help speed up code that would otherwise have to C<use Config>
 and use the value of C<$Config{osname}>.  Of course, to get more
 detailed information about the system, looking into C<%Config> is
@@ -1241,7 +1240,7 @@ systems).  On the mainframe perl currently works under the "Unix system
 services for OS/390" (formerly known as OpenEdition), VM/ESA OpenEdition, or
 the BS200 POSIX-BC system (BS2000 is supported in perl 5.6 and greater).
 See L<perlos390> for details.  Note that for OS/400 there is also a port of
 services for OS/390" (formerly known as OpenEdition), VM/ESA OpenEdition, or
 the BS200 POSIX-BC system (BS2000 is supported in perl 5.6 and greater).
 See L<perlos390> for details.  Note that for OS/400 there is also a port of
-Perl 5.8.1/5.9.0 or later to the PASE which is ASCII-based (as opposed to
+Perl 5.8.1/5.10.0 or later to the PASE which is ASCII-based (as opposed to
 ILE which is EBCDIC-based), see L<perlos400>. 
 
 As of R2.5 of USS for OS/390 and Version 2.3 of VM/ESA these Unix
 ILE which is EBCDIC-based), see L<perlos400>. 
 
 As of R2.5 of USS for OS/390 and Version 2.3 of VM/ESA these Unix
@@ -2038,7 +2037,7 @@ should not be held open elsewhere. (Win32)
 
 =item umask
 
 
 =item umask
 
-Returns undef where unavailable, as of version 5.005.
+Returns undef where unavailable.
 
 C<umask> works but the correct permissions are set only when the file
 is finally closed. (AmigaOS)
 
 C<umask> works but the correct permissions are set only when the file
 is finally closed. (AmigaOS)