This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
perldiag.pod
authorPeter Scott <Peter@PSDT.com>
Fri, 21 Sep 2001 18:54:50 +0000 (11:54 -0700)
committerAbhijit Menon-Sen <ams@wiw.org>
Sat, 22 Sep 2001 03:02:26 +0000 (03:02 +0000)
Message-Id: <4.3.2.7.2.20010921183823.00aa9890@mail.webquarry.com>
       (Moved to the right place.)

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@12119

pod/perldiag.pod

index ff8e0a7..94c6526 100644 (file)
@@ -1696,7 +1696,6 @@ operations.
 The <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
 discovered.
 
-
 =item Internal inconsistency in tracking vforks
 
 (S) A warning peculiar to VMS.  Perl keeps track of the number of times
@@ -1712,7 +1711,6 @@ terminate the Perl script and execute the specified command.
 <-- HERE shows in the regular expression about where the problem was
 discovered.
 
-
 =item %s (...) interpreted as function
 
 (W syntax) You've run afoul of the rule that says that any list operator
@@ -1853,7 +1851,6 @@ shows in the regular expression about where the problem was discovered.
     prefix1;prefix2
 
 or
-
     prefix1 prefix2
 
 with nonempty prefix1 and prefix2.  If C<prefix1> is indeed a prefix of
@@ -2797,6 +2794,13 @@ Perl guesses a reasonable buffer size, but puts a sentinel byte at the
 end of the buffer just in case.  This sentinel byte got clobbered, and
 Perl assumes that memory is now corrupted.  See L<perlfunc/ioctl>.
 
+=item Possible unintended interpolation of %s in string
+
+(W ambiguous) You said something like `@foo' in a double-quoted string
+but there was no array C<@foo> in scope at the time.  If you wanted
+literally to say `@foo' then backslash it: `\@foo'; otherwise find out
+what happened to the array you apparently lost track of.
+
 =item Possible Y2K bug: %s
 
 (W y2k) You are concatenating the number 19 with another number, which