This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Perl 6 -> Raku where appropriate
authorH.Merijn Brand <h.m.brand@xs4all.nl>
Thu, 28 May 2020 12:38:52 +0000 (14:38 +0200)
committerSawyer X <xsawyerx@cpan.org>
Sat, 30 May 2020 14:37:16 +0000 (17:37 +0300)
12 files changed:
Porting/todo.pod
ext/mro/mro.pm
lib/feature.pm
pod/perlcheat.pod
pod/perlcommunity.pod
pod/perliol.pod
pod/perlootut.pod
pod/perlpolicy.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlsyn.pod
pp.c
regen/feature.pl

index 3df408f..b2047e9 100644 (file)
@@ -952,9 +952,9 @@ Currently this is illegal:
 
     state ($a, $b) = foo(); 
 
-In Perl 6, C<state ($a) = foo();> and C<(state $a) = foo();> have different
+In Raku, C<state ($a) = foo();> and C<(state $a) = foo();> have different
 semantics, which is tricky to implement in Perl 5 as currently they produce
-the same opcode trees. The Perl 6 design is firm, so it would be good to
+the same opcode trees. The Raku design is firm, so it would be good to
 implement the necessary code in Perl 5. There are comments in
 C<Perl_newASSIGNOP()> that show the code paths taken by various assignment
 constructions involving state variables.
index d094c02..e927dc1 100644 (file)
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ resolution order under multiple inheritance. It was first introduced in
 the language Dylan (see links in the L</"SEE ALSO"> section), and then
 later adopted as the preferred MRO (Method Resolution Order) for the
 new-style classes in Python 2.3. Most recently it has been adopted as the
-"canonical" MRO for Perl 6 classes, and the default MRO for Parrot objects
+"canonical" MRO for Raku classes, and the default MRO for Parrot objects
 as well.
 
 =head2 How does C3 work
index e6f467e..94c80d0 100644 (file)
@@ -135,7 +135,7 @@ disable I<all> features (an unusual request!) use C<no feature ':all'>.
 
 =head2 The 'say' feature
 
-C<use feature 'say'> tells the compiler to enable the Perl 6 style
+C<use feature 'say'> tells the compiler to enable the Raku style
 C<say> function.
 
 See L<perlfunc/say> for details.
@@ -159,7 +159,7 @@ explicitly disabled the warning:
 
     no warnings "experimental::smartmatch";
 
-C<use feature 'switch'> tells the compiler to enable the Perl 6
+C<use feature 'switch'> tells the compiler to enable the Raku
 given/when construct.
 
 See L<perlsyn/"Switch Statements"> for details.
index 73b4679..0bdc392 100644 (file)
@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@ people had useful suggestions. Thank you, Perl Monks.
 
 A special thanks to Damian Conway, who didn't only suggest important changes,
 but also took the time to count the number of listed features and make a
-Perl 6 version to show that Perl will stay Perl.
+Raku version to show that Perl will stay Perl.
 
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ L<https://perlmonks.org/?node_id=216602> - the original PM post
 
 =item *
 
-L<https://perlmonks.org/?node_id=238031> - Damian Conway's Perl 6 version
+L<https://perlmonks.org/?node_id=238031> - Damian Conway's Raku version
 
 =item *
 
index 51b7110..aa14286 100644 (file)
@@ -39,9 +39,9 @@ own IRC network, L<irc://irc.perl.org>. General (not help-oriented) chat can be
 found at L<irc://irc.perl.org/#perl>. Many other more specific chats are also
 hosted on the network. Information about irc.perl.org is located on the
 network's website: L<https://www.irc.perl.org>. For a more help-oriented #perl,
-check out L<irc://irc.freenode.net/#perl>. Perl 6 development also has a
-presence in L<irc://irc.freenode.net/#perl6>. Most Perl-related channels will
-be kind enough to point you in the right direction if you ask nicely.
+check out L<irc://irc.freenode.net/#perl>. Raku development also has a
+presence in L<irc://irc.freenode.net/#raku-dev>. Most Perl-related channels
+will be kind enough to point you in the right direction if you ask nicely.
 
 Any large IRC network (Dalnet, EFnet) is also likely to have a #perl channel,
 with varying activity levels.
index b70a510..a4bb7d6 100644 (file)
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ maintain (source) compatibility.
 
 The aim of the implementation is to provide the PerlIO API in a flexible
 and platform neutral manner. It is also a trial of an "Object Oriented
-C, with vtables" approach which may be applied to Perl 6.
+C, with vtables" approach which may be applied to Raku.
 
 =head2 Basic Structure
 
index d7474b4..b11f628 100644 (file)
@@ -466,7 +466,7 @@ of Perl as "the first postmodern computer language".
 C<Moose> provides a complete, modern OO system. Its biggest influence
 is the Common Lisp Object System, but it also borrows ideas from
 Smalltalk and several other languages. C<Moose> was created by Stevan
-Little, and draws heavily from his work on the Perl 6 OO design.
+Little, and draws heavily from his work on the Raku OO design.
 
 Here is our C<File> class using C<Moose>:
 
index c358d6a..0bcb4d5 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ words, it's your usual mix of technical people.
 
 Over this group of porters presides Larry Wall.  He has the final word
 in what does and does not change in any of the Perl programming languages.
-These days, Larry spends most of his time on Perl 6, while Perl 5 is
+These days, Larry spends most of his time on Raku, while Perl 5 is
 shepherded by a "pumpking", a porter responsible for deciding what
 goes into each release and ensuring that releases happen on a regular
 basis.
index 8c0d204..0a9e8ec 100644 (file)
@@ -2829,7 +2829,7 @@ As a shortcut C<(*MARK:I<NAME>)> can be written C<(*:I<NAME>)>.
 
 =item C<(*THEN)> C<(*THEN:I<NAME>)>
 
-This is similar to the "cut group" operator C<::> from Perl 6.  Like
+This is similar to the "cut group" operator C<::> from Raku.  Like
 C<(*PRUNE)>, this verb always matches, and when backtracked into on
 failure, it causes the regex engine to try the next alternation in the
 innermost enclosing group (capturing or otherwise) that has alternations.
@@ -2865,7 +2865,7 @@ backtrack and try I<C>; but the C<(*PRUNE)> verb will simply fail.
 =item C<(*COMMIT)> C<(*COMMIT:I<arg>)>
 X<(*COMMIT)>
 
-This is the Perl 6 "commit pattern" C<< <commit> >> or C<:::>. It's a
+This is the Raku "commit pattern" C<< <commit> >> or C<:::>. It's a
 zero-width pattern similar to C<(*SKIP)>, except that when backtracked
 into on failure it causes the match to fail outright. No further attempts
 to find a valid match by advancing the start pointer will occur again.
index 89a68ce..81270f1 100644 (file)
@@ -636,7 +636,7 @@ right), you can say
     use feature "switch";
 
 to enable an experimental switch feature.  This is loosely based on an
-old version of a Perl 6 proposal, but it no longer resembles the Perl 6
+old version of a Raku proposal, but it no longer resembles the Raku
 construct.   You also get the switch feature whenever you declare that your
 code prefers to run under a version of Perl that is 5.10 or later.  For
 example:
@@ -707,7 +707,7 @@ Due to an unfortunate bug in how C<given> was implemented between Perl 5.10
 and 5.16, under those implementations the version of C<$_> governed by
 C<given> is merely a lexically scoped copy of the original, not a
 dynamically scoped alias to the original, as it would be if it were a
-C<foreach> or under both the original and the current Perl 6 language
+C<foreach> or under both the original and the current Raku language
 specification.  This bug was fixed in Perl 5.18 (and lexicalized C<$_> itself
 was removed in Perl 5.24).
 
@@ -1199,13 +1199,13 @@ interested in only the first match alone.
 This doesn't work if you explicitly specify a loop variable, as
 in C<for $item (@array)>.  You have to use the default variable C<$_>.
 
-=head3 Differences from Perl 6
+=head3 Differences from Raku
 
 The Perl 5 smartmatch and C<given>/C<when> constructs are not compatible
-with their Perl 6 analogues.  The most visible difference and least
+with their Raku analogues.  The most visible difference and least
 important difference is that, in Perl 5, parentheses are required around
 the argument to C<given()> and C<when()> (except when this last one is used
-as a statement modifier).  Parentheses in Perl 6 are always optional in a
+as a statement modifier).  Parentheses in Raku are always optional in a
 control construct such as C<if()>, C<while()>, or C<when()>; they can't be
 made optional in Perl 5 without a great deal of potential confusion,
 because Perl 5 would parse the expression
@@ -1233,7 +1233,7 @@ this works in Perl 5:
 
     say "that's all, folks!";
 
-But it doesn't work at all in Perl 6.  Instead, you should
+But it doesn't work at all in Raku.  Instead, you should
 use the (parallelizable) C<any> operator:
 
    if any(@primary) eq "red" {
@@ -1245,11 +1245,11 @@ use the (parallelizable) C<any> operator:
    }
 
 The table of smartmatches in L<perlop/"Smartmatch Operator"> is not
-identical to that proposed by the Perl 6 specification, mainly due to
-differences between Perl 6's and Perl 5's data models, but also because
-the Perl 6 spec has changed since Perl 5 rushed into early adoption.
+identical to that proposed by the Raku specification, mainly due to
+differences between Raku's and Perl 5's data models, but also because
+the Raku spec has changed since Perl 5 rushed into early adoption.
 
-In Perl 6, C<when()> will always do an implicit smartmatch with its
+In Raku, C<when()> will always do an implicit smartmatch with its
 argument, while in Perl 5 it is convenient (albeit potentially confusing) to
 suppress this implicit smartmatch in various rather loosely-defined
 situations, as roughly outlined above.  (The difference is largely because
diff --git a/pp.c b/pp.c
index c3b18b5..df80830 100644 (file)
--- a/pp.c
+++ b/pp.c
@@ -1998,9 +1998,9 @@ static IV S_iv_shift(IV iv, int shift, bool left)
 
     /* For left shifts, perl 5 has chosen to treat the value as unsigned for
      * the * purposes of shifting, then cast back to signed.  This is very
-     * different from perl 6:
+     * different from Raku:
      *
-     * $ perl6 -e 'say -2 +< 5'
+     * $ raku -e 'say -2 +< 5'
      * -64
      *
      * $ ./perl -le 'print -2 << 5'
index 667f524..2af9b74 100755 (executable)
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ disable I<all> features (an unusual request!) use C<no feature ':all'>.
 
 =head2 The 'say' feature
 
-C<use feature 'say'> tells the compiler to enable the Perl 6 style
+C<use feature 'say'> tells the compiler to enable the Raku style
 C<say> function.
 
 See L<perlfunc/say> for details.
@@ -561,7 +561,7 @@ explicitly disabled the warning:
 
     no warnings "experimental::smartmatch";
 
-C<use feature 'switch'> tells the compiler to enable the Perl 6
+C<use feature 'switch'> tells the compiler to enable the Raku
 given/when construct.
 
 See L<perlsyn/"Switch Statements"> for details.