This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Pod updates
authorStephen P. Potter <spp@ds.net>
Mon, 6 Nov 2000 18:56:43 +0000 (13:56 -0500)
committerJarkko Hietaniemi <jhi@iki.fi>
Tue, 7 Nov 2000 00:12:54 +0000 (00:12 +0000)
Message-Id: <200011062357.SAA18173@spotter.yi.org>

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@7585

39 files changed:
README.dos
README.os2
README.win32
pod/buildtoc.PL
pod/perl.pod
pod/perl5004delta.pod
pod/perl5005delta.pod
pod/perl56delta.pod
pod/perldebguts.pod
pod/perldebtut.pod
pod/perldebug.pod
pod/perldelta.pod
pod/perldiag.pod
pod/perlembed.pod
pod/perlfaq.pod
pod/perlfaq1.pod
pod/perlfaq2.pod
pod/perlfaq5.pod
pod/perlfaq7.pod
pod/perlfaq8.pod
pod/perlfilter.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlguts.pod
pod/perlhack.pod
pod/perlhist.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perllexwarn.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlmodlib.pod
pod/perlnumber.pod
pod/perlop.pod
pod/perlopentut.pod
pod/perlport.pod
pod/perlre.pod
pod/perlsub.pod
pod/perltie.pod
pod/perltoot.pod
pod/perltootc.pod
pod/perlunicode.pod

index 3fd5760..fe649ed 100644 (file)
@@ -229,8 +229,6 @@ goes under C<($DJDIR)/lib/perl5/pod>.
 
 =head2 Prerequisites
 
-=over 4
-
 For building and installing non-XS modules, all you need is a working
 perl under DJGPP.  Non-XS modules do not require re-linking the perl
 binary, and so are simpler to build and install.
@@ -247,12 +245,8 @@ an XS extension module.  In addition, you will have to have built your
 perl binary from the source distribution so that all of the components
 of the perl binary are available for the required link step.
 
-=back
-
 =head2 Unpacking CPAN Modules
 
-=over 4
-
 First, download the module package from CPAN (e.g., the "Comma Separated
 Value" text package, Text-CSV-0.01.tar.gz).  Then expand the contents of
 the package into some location on your disk.  Most CPAN modules are
@@ -278,15 +272,11 @@ to unpack and expand these files.  For example:
 This will create the new directory C<($DJDIR)/Text-CSV-0.01>, filling
 it with the source for this module.
 
-=back
-
 =head2 Building Non-XS Modules
 
 To build a non-XS module, you can use the standard module-building
 instructions distributed with perl modules.
 
-=over 4
-
     perl Makefile.PL
     make
     make test
@@ -296,16 +286,12 @@ This is sufficient because non-XS modules install only ".pm" files and
 (sometimes) pod and/or man documentation.  No re-linking of the perl
 binary is needed to build, install or use non-XS modules.
 
-=back
-
 =head2 Building XS Modules
 
 To build an XS module, you must use the standard module-building
 instructions distributed with perl modules *PLUS* three extra
 instructions specific to the DJGPP "static link" build environment.
 
-=over 4
-
     set FNCASE=y
     perl Makefile.PL
     make
@@ -333,8 +319,6 @@ by using the command:
 
         perl -S perldoc perllocal
 
-=back
-
 =head1 AUTHOR
 
 Laszlo Molnar, F<laszlo.molnar@eth.ericsson.se> [Installing/building perl]
index b12ee0b..19af8c5 100644 (file)
@@ -394,12 +394,12 @@ is considered a bug and should be fixed soon.
 
 =over 4
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 Did you run your programs with C<-w> switch? See 
 L<Starting OS/2 (and DOS) programs under Perl>.
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 Do you try to run I<internal> shell commands, like C<`copy a b`>
 (internal for F<cmd.exe>), or C<`glob a*b`> (internal for ksh)? You
@@ -1163,18 +1163,18 @@ eventually).
 
 =over 4
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 Since L<flock(3)> is present in EMX, but is not functional, it is 
 emulated by perl.  To disable the emulations, set environment variable
 C<USE_PERL_FLOCK=0>.
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 Here is the list of things which may be "broken" on
 EMX (from EMX docs):
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 
@@ -1205,7 +1205,7 @@ L<waitpid(3)>:
 
 Note that C<kill -9> does not work with the current version of EMX.
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 Since F<sh.exe> is used for globing (see L<perlfunc/glob>), the bugs
 of F<sh.exe> plague perl as well. 
@@ -1517,9 +1517,9 @@ cannot test it.
 For the details of the current situation with calling external programs,
 see L<Starting OS/2 (and DOS) programs under Perl>.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
-=item
+=item *
 
 External scripts may be called by name.  Perl will try the same extensions
 as when processing B<-S> command-line switch.
@@ -1549,7 +1549,7 @@ preliminary.
 
 Most notable problems: 
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<COND_WAIT> 
 
index 8e29acc..dc90ada 100644 (file)
@@ -620,11 +620,11 @@ by C<perl -V>.
 
 =over 4
 
-Gary Ng E<lt>71564.1743@CompuServe.COME<gt>
+=item Gary Ng E<lt>71564.1743@CompuServe.COME<gt>
 
-Gurusamy Sarathy E<lt>gsar@activestate.comE<gt>
+=item Gurusamy Sarathy E<lt>gsar@activestate.comE<gt>
 
-Nick Ing-Simmons E<lt>nick@ni-s.u-net.comE<gt>
+=item Nick Ing-Simmons E<lt>nick@ni-s.u-net.comE<gt>
 
 =back
 
index 90deff4..ff8d33c 100644 (file)
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ podset( @modules[ sort { $modname[$a] cmp $modname[$b] } 0 .. $#modules ] );
        Here should be listed all the extra programs' documentation, but they
        don't all have manual pages yet:
 
-       =over
+       =over 4
 
        =item a2p
 
@@ -385,13 +385,13 @@ sub podset {
        }
        if (s/^=head1 (.*)/=item $1/) {
            unhead2();
-           output "=over\n\n" unless $inhead1;
+           output "=over 4\n\n" unless $inhead1;
            $inhead1 = 1;
            output $_; nl(); next;
        }
        if (s/^=head2 (.*)/=item $1/) {
            unitem();
-           output "=over\n\n" unless $inhead2;
+           output "=over 4\n\n" unless $inhead2;
            $inhead2 = 1;
            output $_; nl(); next;
        }
@@ -403,7 +403,7 @@ sub podset {
            s/\s+$//;
            next if /^[\d.]+$/;
            next if $pod eq 'perlmodlib' && /^ftp:/;
-           ##print "=over\n\n" unless $initem;
+           ##print "=over 4\n\n" unless $initem;
            output ", " if $initem;
            $initem = 1;
            s/\.$//;
index 9f3824d..97514ee 100644 (file)
@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@ But wait, there's more...
 Begun in 1993 (see L<perlhist>), Perl version 5 is nearly a complete
 rewrite that provides the following additional benefits:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item * modularity and reusability using innumerable modules 
 
index 8cec3ab..7151d86 100644 (file)
@@ -24,7 +24,10 @@ problems.  See the F<Changes> file in the distribution for details.
 C<%ENV = ()> and C<%ENV = @list> now work as expected (except on VMS
 where it generates a fatal error).
 
-=head2 "Can't locate Foo.pm in @INC" error now lists @INC
+=head2 Change to "Can't locate Foo.pm in @INC" error
+
+The error "Can't locate Foo.pm in @INC" now lists the contents of @INC
+for easier debugging.
 
 =head2 Compilation option: Binary compatibility with 5.003
 
@@ -198,7 +201,7 @@ hole was just plugged.
 
 The new restrictions when tainting include:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item No glob() or <*>
 
@@ -258,7 +261,7 @@ the F<INSTALL> file for how to use it.
 
 =head2 New and changed syntax
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item $coderef->(PARAMS)
 
@@ -276,7 +279,7 @@ S<C<< $table->{FOO}->($bar) >>>.
 
 =head2 New and changed builtin constants
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item __PACKAGE__
 
@@ -289,7 +292,7 @@ into strings.
 
 =head2 New and changed builtin variables
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item $^E
 
@@ -322,7 +325,7 @@ there is no C<use English> long name for this variable.
 
 =head2 New and changed builtin functions
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item delete on slices
 
@@ -544,7 +547,7 @@ subroutine:
 The C<UNIVERSAL> package automatically contains the following methods that
 are inherited by all other classes:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item isa(CLASS)
 
@@ -593,7 +596,7 @@ have C<isa> available as a plain subroutine in the current package.
 
 See L<perltie> for other kinds of tie()s.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
 
@@ -687,7 +690,7 @@ install the optional module Devel::Peek.)
 Three new compilation flags are recognized by malloc.c.  (They have no
 effect if perl is compiled with system malloc().)
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item -DPERL_EMERGENCY_SBRK
 
@@ -779,7 +782,7 @@ See F<README.amigaos> in the perl distribution.
 
 Six new pragmatic modules exist:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item use autouse MODULE => qw(sub1 sub2 sub3)
 
@@ -979,7 +982,7 @@ those who need trigonometric functions only for real numbers.
 There have been quite a few changes made to DB_File. Here are a few of
 the highlights:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 
@@ -1045,7 +1048,7 @@ For example, you can now say
 
 =head2 pod2html
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Sends converted HTML to standard output
 
@@ -1058,7 +1061,7 @@ Use the B<--outfile=FILENAME> option to write to a file.
 
 =head2 xsubpp
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<void> XSUBs now default to returning nothing
 
@@ -1083,7 +1086,7 @@ XSUB's return type is really C<SV *>.
 
 =head1 C Language API Changes
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<gv_fetchmethod> and C<perl_call_sv>
 
@@ -1124,7 +1127,7 @@ which can be more efficient.  See L<perlguts> for details.
 Many of the base and library pods were updated.  These
 new pods are included in section 1:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item L<perldelta>
 
@@ -1177,7 +1180,7 @@ increasing order of desperation):
    (X) A very fatal error (nontrappable).
    (A) An alien error message (not generated by Perl).
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item "my" variable %s masks earlier declaration in same scope
 
index b133c0d..d863453 100644 (file)
@@ -525,7 +525,7 @@ The hints files for most Unix platforms have seen incremental improvements.
 
 =head2 New Modules
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item B
 
@@ -596,7 +596,7 @@ Various pragmata to control behavior of regular expressions.
 
 =head2 Changes in existing modules
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Benchmark
 
@@ -702,7 +702,7 @@ L<perlthrtut> gives a tutorial on threads.
 
 =head1 New Diagnostics
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Ambiguous call resolved as CORE::%s(), qualify as such or use &
 
@@ -916,7 +916,7 @@ fix the problem can be found in L<perllocale/"LOCALE PROBLEMS">.
 
 =head1 Obsolete Diagnostics
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Can't mktemp()
 
index 9f30314..d11f908 100644 (file)
@@ -786,7 +786,7 @@ regardless of whether or not the array has been used or declared
 already.  The fatal error has been downgraded to an optional warning:
 
         Possible unintended interpolation of @example in string
-        
+
 This warns you that C<"fred@example.com"> is going to turn into
 C<fred.com> if you don't backslash the C<@>.
 See http://www.plover.com/~mjd/perl/at-error.html for more details
@@ -1837,7 +1837,8 @@ run in compile-only mode.  Since this is typically not the expected
 behavior, END blocks are not executed anymore when the C<-c> switch
 is used, or if compilation fails.
 
-See L<CHECK blocks> for how to run things when the compile phase ends.
+See L</"Support for CHECK blocks"> for how to run things when the compile 
+phase ends.
 
 =head2 Potential to leak DATA filehandles
 
@@ -2782,7 +2783,7 @@ See L<perlguts/"Memory Allocation"> for further information about that.
 
 =head2 Compatible C Source API Changes
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<PATCHLEVEL> is now C<PERL_VERSION>
 
index 742423b..20cc546 100644 (file)
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ frame was called with are copied to the @DB::args array.  The
 general mechanisms is enabled by calling Perl with the B<-d> switch, the
 following additional features are enabled (cf. L<perlvar/$^P>):
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 
@@ -402,7 +402,7 @@ shorter than 7 chars.
 
 The fields of interest which may appear in the last line are
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<anchored> I<STRING> C<at> I<POS>
 
@@ -693,7 +693,7 @@ Devel::Peek module.
 
 Here is some explanation of that format:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<buckets SMALLEST(APPROX)..GREATEST(APPROX)>
 
@@ -840,7 +840,7 @@ per glob - for glob name, and glob stringification magic.
 
 Here are explanations for other I<Id>s above: 
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<717> 
 
@@ -894,7 +894,7 @@ these categories.
 
 If warn() string starts with
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<!!!> 
 
index 2916897..ece5848 100644 (file)
@@ -495,7 +495,7 @@ And a print to show what values we're currently using:
 
        DB<1> p $deg, $num
        f33.3
-               
+
 We can put another break point on any line beginning with a colon, we'll use
 line 17 as that's just as we come out of the subroutine, and we'd like to
 pause there later on:
@@ -538,7 +538,7 @@ it for inspection.  In this case though, we simply continue down to line 29:
 
        DB<4> c 29  
        main::f2c(temp:29):             return $c;
-   
+
 And have a look at the return value:
 
        DB<5> p $c
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ the DEBUGGING flag for this one:
        floating `'$ at 4..2147483647 (checking floating) stclass `EXACTF <pe>'
 anchored(BOL) minlen 4
        Omitting $` $& $' support.
-        
+
        EXECUTING...
 
        Freeing REx: `^pe(a)*rl$'  
@@ -656,7 +656,7 @@ script from the command-line, try something like this:
 
        > perl -d my_cgi.pl -nodebug 
 
-Of course 'L<perldoc CGI>' and L<perlfaq9> will tell you more.
+Of course L<CGI> and L<perlfaq9> will tell you more.
 
 
 =head1 GUIs
index faff39b..01f35e1 100644 (file)
@@ -82,7 +82,7 @@ recursively, unlike the real C<print> function in Perl.
 See L<Dumpvalue> if you'd like to do this yourself.
 
 The output format is governed by multiple options described under
-L<"Options">.
+L<"Configurable Options">.
 
 =item V [pkg [vars]]
 
@@ -308,8 +308,8 @@ For historical reasons, the C<=value> is optional, but defaults to
 1 only where it is safe to do so--that is, mostly for Boolean
 options.  It is always better to assign a specific value using C<=>.
 The C<option> can be abbreviated, but for clarity probably should
-not be.  Several options can be set together.  See L<"Options"> for
-a list of these.
+not be.  Several options can be set together.  See L<"Configurable Options"> 
+for a list of these.
 
 =item < ? 
 
index 72a2904..0597ff6 100644 (file)
@@ -232,8 +232,6 @@ C<%INC> now localised in a Safe compartment so that use/require work.
 
 The Shell module now has an OO interface.
 
-=item *
-
 =back
 
 =head1 Utility Changes
@@ -726,6 +724,8 @@ winsock handle leak fixed.
 
 =back
 
+=back
+
 =head1 New or Changed Diagnostics
 
 All regular expression compilation error messages are now hopefully
@@ -852,6 +852,8 @@ made in other platforms.
 
 st-store.t and st-retrieve may fail with Compaq C 6.2 on OpenVMS Alpha 7.2.
 
+=back
+
 =head2 Threads Are Still Experimental
 
 Multithreading is still an experimental feature.  Some platforms
@@ -881,8 +883,6 @@ The compiler suite is slowly getting better but is nowhere near
 working order yet.  The backend part that has seen perhaps the most
 progress is the bytecode compiler.
 
-=back
-
 =head1 Reporting Bugs
 
 If you find what you think is a bug, you might check the articles
index 20a4a76..65cdd6c 100644 (file)
@@ -1116,8 +1116,8 @@ workarounds.
 
 =item Copy method did not return a reference
 
-(F) The method which overloads "=" is buggy. See L<overload/Copy
-Constructor>.
+(F) The method which overloads "=" is buggy. See 
+L<overload/Copy Constructor>.
 
 =item CORE::%s is not a keyword
 
@@ -1660,8 +1660,8 @@ shows in the regular expression about where the problem was discovered.
 
 (W syntax) You've run afoul of the rule that says that any list operator
 followed by parentheses turns into a function, with all the list
-operators arguments found inside the parentheses.  See L<perlop/Terms
-and List Operators (Leftward)>.
+operators arguments found inside the parentheses.  See 
+L<perlop/Terms and List Operators (Leftward)>.
 
 =item Invalid %s attribute: %s
 
index 1787e4b..6e3db32 100644 (file)
@@ -37,25 +37,25 @@ Read on...
 
 =over 5
 
-L<Compiling your C program>
+=item Compiling your C program
 
-L<Adding a Perl interpreter to your C program>
+=item Adding a Perl interpreter to your C program
 
-L<Calling a Perl subroutine from your C program>
+=item Calling a Perl subroutine from your C program
 
-L<Evaluating a Perl statement from your C program>
+=item Evaluating a Perl statement from your C program
 
-L<Performing Perl pattern matches and substitutions from your C program>
+=item Performing Perl pattern matches and substitutions from your C program
 
-L<Fiddling with the Perl stack from your C program>
+=item Fiddling with the Perl stack from your C program
 
-L<Maintaining a persistent interpreter>
+=item Maintaining a persistent interpreter
 
-L<Maintaining multiple interpreter instances>
+=item Maintaining multiple interpreter instances
 
-L<Using Perl modules, which themselves use C libraries, from your C program>
+=item Using Perl modules, which themselves use C libraries, from your C program
 
-L<Embedding Perl under Win32>
+=item Embedding Perl under Win32
 
 =back 
 
@@ -258,9 +258,8 @@ and package C<END {}> blocks.
 If you want to pass arguments to the Perl subroutine, you can add
 strings to the C<NULL>-terminated C<args> list passed to
 I<call_argv>.  For other data types, or to examine return values,
-you'll need to manipulate the Perl stack.  That's demonstrated in the
-last section of this document: L<Fiddling with the Perl stack from
-your C program>.
+you'll need to manipulate the Perl stack.  That's demonstrated in
+L<Fiddling with the Perl stack from your C program>.
 
 =head2 Evaluating a Perl statement from your C program
 
@@ -948,7 +947,7 @@ B<ExtUtils::Embed> can also automate writing the I<xs_init> glue code.
 
 Consult L<perlxs>, L<perlguts>, and L<perlapi> for more details.
 
-=head1 Embedding Perl under Windows
+=head1 Embedding Perl under Win32
 
 In general, all of the source code shown here should work unmodified under
 Windows.
index ffa4a17..d350f60 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ perlfaq - frequently asked questions about Perl ($Date: 1999/05/23 20:38:02 $)
 
 This document is structured into the following sections:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item perlfaq: Structural overview of the FAQ.
 
index af2ac87..a81d704 100644 (file)
@@ -78,8 +78,8 @@ The 5.0 release is, essentially, a ground-up rewrite of the original
 perl source code from releases 1 through 4.  It has been modularized,
 object-oriented, tweaked, trimmed, and optimized until it almost doesn't
 look like the old code.  However, the interface is mostly the same, and
-compatibility with previous releases is very high. See L<perltrap/"Perl4
-to Perl5 Traps">.
+compatibility with previous releases is very high. 
+See L<perltrap/"Perl4 to Perl5 Traps">.
 
 To avoid the "what language is perl5?" confusion, some people prefer to
 simply use "perl" to refer to the latest version of perl and avoid using
index 62aa5dd..f438baa 100644 (file)
@@ -80,8 +80,8 @@ part of the output of
 
     % perl -V
 
-You might also want to check out L<perlfaq8/"How do I keep my own
-module/library directory?">.
+You might also want to check out 
+L<perlfaq8/"How do I keep my own module/library directory?">.
 
 =head2 I grabbed the sources and tried to compile but gdbm/dynamic loading/malloc/linking/... failed.  How do I make it work?
 
@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ useful.  Your mileage may (but, we hope, probably won't) vary.
 
 Recommended books on (or mostly on) Perl follow.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item References
 
index 94e478a..e4ad3fa 100644 (file)
@@ -294,8 +294,8 @@ pair to make it easy to sort the hash in insertion order.
     }
 
 For passing filehandles to functions, the easiest way is to 
-preface them with a star, as in func(*STDIN).  See L<perlfaq7/"Passing
-Filehandles"> for details.
+preface them with a star, as in func(*STDIN).  
+See L<perlfaq7/"Passing Filehandles"> for details.
 
 If you want to create many anonymous handles, you should check out the
 Symbol, FileHandle, or IO::Handle (etc.) modules.  Here's the equivalent
@@ -675,8 +675,8 @@ for your own system's idiosyncrasies (sometimes called "features").
 Slavish adherence to portability concerns shouldn't get in the way of
 your getting your job done.)
 
-For more information on file locking, see also L<perlopentut/"File
-Locking"> if you have it (new for 5.6).
+For more information on file locking, see also 
+L<perlopentut/"File Locking"> if you have it (new for 5.6).
 
 =back
 
index 8040f19..9e559f7 100644 (file)
@@ -560,8 +560,8 @@ In summary, local() doesn't make what you think of as private, local
 variables.  It gives a global variable a temporary value.  my() is
 what you're looking for if you want private variables.
 
-See L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> and L<perlsub/"Temporary
-Values via local()"> for excruciating details.
+See L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> and 
+L<perlsub/"Temporary Values via local()"> for excruciating details.
 
 =head2 How can I access a dynamic variable while a similarly named lexical is in scope?
 
index 1f8a72b..d806ed6 100644 (file)
@@ -571,9 +571,9 @@ scripts inherently insecure.  Perl gives you a number of options
 The IPC::Open2 module (part of the standard perl distribution) is an
 easy-to-use approach that internally uses pipe(), fork(), and exec() to do
 the job.  Make sure you read the deadlock warnings in its documentation,
-though (see L<IPC::Open2>).  See L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication
-with Another Process"> and L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with
-Yourself">
+though (see L<IPC::Open2>).  See 
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process"> and 
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Yourself">
 
 You may also use the IPC::Open3 module (part of the standard perl
 distribution), but be warned that it has a different order of
index c3c8315..4327809 100644 (file)
@@ -2,7 +2,6 @@
 
 perlfilter - Source Filters
 
-
 =head1 DESCRIPTION
 
 This article is about a little-known feature of Perl called
index c502bf7..558ae4e 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ functions, like some keywords and named operators)
 arranged by category.  Some functions appear in more
 than one place.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Functions for SCALARs or strings
 
@@ -2348,8 +2348,8 @@ it succeeded, false otherwise.  See the example in L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Se
 =item local EXPR
 
 You really probably want to be using C<my> instead, because C<local> isn't
-what most people think of as "local".  See L<perlsub/"Private Variables
-via my()"> for details.
+what most people think of as "local".  See 
+L<perlsub/"Private Variables via my()"> for details.
 
 A local modifies the listed variables to be local to the enclosing
 block, file, or eval.  If more than one value is listed, the list must
@@ -4265,9 +4265,9 @@ Examples:
 If you're using strict, you I<must not> declare $a
 and $b as lexicals.  They are package globals.  That means
 if you're in the C<main> package and type
-  
+
     @articles = sort {$b <=> $a} @files;
-  
+
 then C<$a> and C<$b> are C<$main::a> and C<$main::b> (or C<$::a> and C<$::b>),
 but if you're in the C<FooPack> package, it's the same as typing
 
index 4d62774..c069e88 100644 (file)
@@ -1088,7 +1088,7 @@ an C<ENTER>/C<LEAVE> pair.
 
 Inside such a I<pseudo-block> the following service is available:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<SAVEINT(int i)>
 
@@ -1161,7 +1161,7 @@ provide pointers to the modifiable data explicitly (either C pointers,
 or Perlish C<GV *>s).  Where the above macros take C<int>, a similar 
 function takes C<int *>.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<SV* save_scalar(GV *gv)>
 
index 9ec1ff9..41684b8 100644 (file)
@@ -1031,7 +1031,7 @@ the tied C<push> is implemented; see C<av_push> in F<av.c>:
      7 call_method("PUSH", G_SCALAR|G_DISCARD);
      8 LEAVE;
      9 POPSTACK;
-       
+
 The lines which concern the mark stack are the first, fifth and last
 lines: they save away, restore and remove the current position of the
 argument stack. 
@@ -1154,7 +1154,7 @@ useful options are probably
 
 Some of the functionality of the debugging code can be achieved using XS
 modules.
-    
+
     -Dr => use re 'debug'
     -Dx => use O 'Debug'
 
@@ -1216,7 +1216,7 @@ Run until the next breakpoint.
 
 Run until the end of the current function, then stop again.
 
-=item
+=item 'enter'
 
 Just pressing Enter will do the most recent operation again - it's a
 blessing when stepping through miles of source code.
@@ -1460,7 +1460,7 @@ this text in the description of C<pack>:
 All done. Now let's create the patch. F<Porting/patching.pod> tells us
 that if we're making major changes, we should copy the entire directory
 to somewhere safe before we begin fiddling, and then do
-    
+
     diff -ruN old new > patch
 
 However, we know which files we've changed, and we can simply do this:
index 2aa928c..f5a9602 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,3 @@
-=pod
-
 =head1 NAME
 
 perlhist - the Perl history records
index 94b6bde..758f303 100644 (file)
@@ -952,7 +952,7 @@ looks like this:
 
 Here are what those parameters to the C<new> constructor mean:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<Proto>
 
@@ -1147,7 +1147,7 @@ does nothing but listen on a particular port for incoming connections.
 It does this by calling the C<< IO::Socket::INET->new() >> method with
 slightly different arguments than the client did.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Proto
 
index 3dd3ba9..b98e333 100644 (file)
@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ Consider this example:
         bless [], $class ;
     }
 
-   
+
     1 ;
 
 The code below makes use of both modules, but it only enables warnings from 
index 3d9a58a..fb93792 100644 (file)
@@ -124,8 +124,8 @@ B<The POSIX date formatting function> (strftime()) uses C<LC_TIME>.
 
 =back
 
-C<LC_COLLATE>, C<LC_CTYPE>, and so on, are discussed further in L<LOCALE
-CATEGORIES>.
+C<LC_COLLATE>, C<LC_CTYPE>, and so on, are discussed further in 
+L<LOCALE CATEGORIES>.
 
 The default behavior is restored with the S<C<no locale>> pragma, or
 upon reaching the end of block enclosing C<use locale>.
@@ -348,8 +348,8 @@ commands.  You may see things like "en_US.ISO8859-1", but that isn't
 the same.  In this case, try running under a locale
 that you can list and which somehow matches what you tried.  The
 rules for matching locale names are a bit vague because
-standardization is weak in this area.  See again the L<Finding
-locales> about general rules.
+standardization is weak in this area.  See again the 
+L<Finding locales> about general rules.
 
 =head2 Fixing system locale configuration
 
@@ -580,11 +580,12 @@ The C standard defines the C<LC_MONETARY> category, but no function
 that is affected by its contents.  (Those with experience of standards
 committees will recognize that the working group decided to punt on the
 issue.)  Consequently, Perl takes no notice of it.  If you really want
-to use C<LC_MONETARY>, you can query its contents--see L<The localeconv
-function>--and use the information that it returns in your application's
-own formatting of currency amounts.  However, you may well find that
-the information, voluminous and complex though it may be, still does not
-quite meet your requirements: currency formatting is a hard nut to crack.
+to use C<LC_MONETARY>, you can query its contents--see 
+L<The localeconv function>--and use the information that it returns in your 
+application's own formatting of currency amounts.  However, you may well 
+find that the information, voluminous and complex though it may be, still 
+does not quite meet your requirements: currency formatting is a hard nut 
+to crack.
 
 =head2 LC_TIME
 
index f37279d..c5afea2 100644 (file)
@@ -98,10 +98,6 @@ Compute arithmetic in integer instead of double
 
 Request less of something from the compiler
 
-=item lib
-
-Manipulate @INC at compile time
-
 =item locale
 
 Use and avoid POSIX locales for built-in operations
@@ -146,6 +142,10 @@ Predeclare global variable names (obsolete)
 
 Control optional warnings
 
+=item warnings::register
+
+Warnings import function
+
 =back
 
 =head2 Standard Modules
@@ -220,6 +220,10 @@ Show lexical variables used in functions or files
 
 Helper module for CC backend
 
+=item B::Stash
+
+Show what stashes are loaded
+
 =item B::Terse
 
 Walk Perl syntax tree, printing terse info about ops
@@ -316,6 +320,10 @@ Supply object methods for directory handles
 
 Provides screen dump of Perl data.
 
+=item Encode
+
+Character encodings
+
 =item English
 
 Use nice English (or awk) names for ugly punctuation variables
@@ -572,6 +580,10 @@ Module to convert pod files to HTML
 
 Objects representing POD input paragraphs, commands, etc.
 
+=item Pod::LaTeX
+
+Convert Pod data to formatted Latex
+
 =item Pod::Man
 
 Convert POD data to formatted *roff input
@@ -636,6 +648,10 @@ Run shell commands transparently within perl
 
 Load the C socket.h defines and structure manipulators 
 
+=item Storable
+
+Persistency for perl data structures
+
 =item Symbol
 
 Manipulate Perl symbols and their names
@@ -775,7 +791,7 @@ Most importantly, CPAN includes around a thousand unbundled modules,
 some of which require a C compiler to build.  Major categories of
 modules are:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 Language Extensions and Documentation Tools
@@ -845,7 +861,7 @@ Miscellaneous Modules
 Registered CPAN sites as of this writing include the following.
 You should try to choose one close to you:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Africa
 
index d179d8c..44d921c 100644 (file)
@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@ Six such conversions are possible:
 
 These conversions are governed by the following general rules:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 
@@ -141,7 +141,7 @@ argument as in modular arithmetic, e.g., C<mod 2**32> on a 32-bit
 architecture.  C<sprintf "%u", -1> therefore provides the same result as
 C<sprintf "%u", ~0>.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Arithmetic operators except, C<no integer>
 
index 69c8c69..70fef45 100644 (file)
@@ -798,7 +798,7 @@ the trailing delimiter.  This avoids expensive run-time recompilations,
 and is useful when the value you are interpolating won't change over
 the life of the script.  However, mentioning C</o> constitutes a promise
 that you won't change the variables in the pattern.  If you change them,
-Perl won't even notice.  See also L<"qr//">.
+Perl won't even notice.  See also L<"qr/STRING/imosx">.
 
 If the PATTERN evaluates to the empty string, the last
 I<successfully> matched regular expression is used instead.
@@ -1338,7 +1338,7 @@ their results are the same, we consider them individually.  For different
 quoting constructs, Perl performs different numbers of passes, from
 one to five, but these passes are always performed in the same order.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Finding the end
 
@@ -1392,7 +1392,7 @@ used in parsing.
 The next step is interpolation in the text obtained, which is now
 delimiter-independent.  There are four different cases.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<<<'EOF'>, C<m''>, C<s'''>, C<tr///>, C<y///>
 
@@ -1842,8 +1842,8 @@ integer>, if you take the C<sqrt(2)>, you'll still get C<1.4142135623731>
 or so.
 
 Used on numbers, the bitwise operators ("&", "|", "^", "~", "<<",
-and ">>") always produce integral results.  (But see also L<Bitwise
-String Operators>.)  However, C<use integer> still has meaning for
+and ">>") always produce integral results.  (But see also 
+L<Bitwise String Operators>.)  However, C<use integer> still has meaning for
 them.  By default, their results are interpreted as unsigned integers, but
 if C<use integer> is in effect, their results are interpreted
 as signed integers.  For example, C<~0> usually evaluates to a large
index 5d2d48e..b4003f4 100644 (file)
@@ -73,8 +73,8 @@ from a different file, and forget to trim it before opening:
 This is not a bug, but a feature.  Because C<open> mimics the shell in
 its style of using redirection arrows to specify how to open the file, it
 also does so with respect to extra white space around the filename itself
-as well.  For accessing files with naughty names, see L<"Dispelling
-the Dweomer">.
+as well.  For accessing files with naughty names, see 
+L<"Dispelling the Dweomer">.
 
 =head2 Pipe Opens
 
@@ -107,13 +107,13 @@ In most systems, such an C<open> will not return an error. That's
 because in the traditional C<fork>/C<exec> model, running the other
 program happens only in the forked child process, which means that
 the failed C<exec> can't be reflected in the return value of C<open>.
-Only a failed C<fork> shows up there.  See L<perlfaq8/"Why doesn't open()
-return an error when a pipe open fails?"> to see how to cope with this.
-There's also an explanation in L<perlipc>.
+Only a failed C<fork> shows up there.  See 
+L<perlfaq8/"Why doesn't open() return an error when a pipe open fails?"> 
+to see how to cope with this.  There's also an explanation in L<perlipc>.
 
 If you would like to open a bidirectional pipe, the IPC::Open2
-library will handle this for you.  Check out L<perlipc/"Bidirectional
-Communication with Another Process">
+library will handle this for you.  Check out 
+L<perlipc/"Bidirectional Communication with Another Process">
 
 =head2 The Minus File
 
@@ -126,8 +126,8 @@ access the standard output.
 If minus can be used as the default input or default output, what happens
 if you open a pipe into or out of minus?  What's the default command it
 would run?  The same script as you're currently running!  This is actually
-a stealth C<fork> hidden inside an C<open> call.  See L<perlipc/"Safe Pipe
-Opens"> for details.
+a stealth C<fork> hidden inside an C<open> call.  See 
+L<perlipc/"Safe Pipe Opens"> for details.
 
 =head2 Mixing Reads and Writes
 
@@ -684,9 +684,9 @@ also some high-level modules on CPAN that can help you with these games.
 Check out Term::ReadKey and Term::ReadLine.
 
 What else can you open?  To open a connection using sockets, you won't use
-one of Perl's two open functions.  See L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server
-Communication"> for that.  Here's an example.  Once you have it,
-you can use FH as a bidirectional filehandle.
+one of Perl's two open functions.  See 
+L<perlipc/"Sockets: Client/Server Communication"> for that.  Here's an 
+example.  Once you have it, you can use FH as a bidirectional filehandle.
 
     use IO::Socket;
     local *FH = IO::Socket::INET->new("www.perl.com:80");
index ebb20b2..76b22c6 100644 (file)
@@ -1213,7 +1213,7 @@ A free perl5-based PERL.NLM for Novell Netware is available in
 precompiled binary and source code form from http://www.novell.com/
 as well as from CPAN.
 
-=item 
+=item  *
 
 Plan 9, F<README.plan9>
 
index 380bc5f..8a85241 100644 (file)
@@ -1129,7 +1129,7 @@ one match at a given position is possible.  This section describes the
 notion of better/worse for combining operators.  In the description
 below C<S> and C<T> are regular subexpressions.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item C<ST>
 
index 9976316..ae128ce 100644 (file)
@@ -169,8 +169,8 @@ Do not, however, be tempted to do this:
 
 Like the flattened incoming parameter list, the return list is also
 flattened on return.  So all you have managed to do here is stored
-everything in C<@a> and made C<@b> an empty list.  See L<Pass by
-Reference> for alternatives.
+everything in C<@a> and made C<@b> an empty list.  See 
+L<Pass by Reference> for alternatives.
 
 A subroutine may be called using an explicit C<&> prefix.  The
 C<&> is optional in modern Perl, as are parentheses if the
@@ -697,7 +697,7 @@ Despite the existence of C<my>, there are still three places where the
 C<local> operator still shines.  In fact, in these three places, you
 I<must> use C<local> instead of C<my>.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item 1. You need to give a global variable a temporary value, especially $_.
 
index 1a58965..0c55c6a 100644 (file)
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ calls.  Here's the preamble of the class.
     use strict;
     $Nice::DEBUG = 0 unless defined $Nice::DEBUG;
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item TIESCALAR classname, LIST
 
@@ -225,7 +225,7 @@ The preamble code for the class is as follows:
     use Carp;
     use strict;
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item TIEARRAY classname, LIST
 
@@ -400,7 +400,7 @@ that calls it.
 
 Here are the methods for the DotFiles tied hash.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item TIEHASH classname, LIST
 
@@ -655,7 +655,7 @@ In our example we're going to create a shouting handle.
 
     package Shout;
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item TIEHANDLE classname, LIST
 
index 31a7c76..e923673 100644 (file)
@@ -1700,7 +1700,7 @@ as with any other local().
 It would be nice to combine Alias with
 something like Class::Struct or Class::MethodMaker.
 
-=head2 NOTES
+=head1 NOTES
 
 =head2 Object Terminology
 
index 0bcb638..ee0bd02 100644 (file)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ the class itself.
 
 Here are a few examples where class attributes might come in handy:
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item *
 
index c9954d8..e567e18 100644 (file)
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ WARNING: The implementation of Unicode support in Perl is incomplete.
 
 The following areas need further work.
 
-=over
+=over 4
 
 =item Input and Output Disciplines