This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
doubled words in pods (from Simon Cozens
authorGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Thu, 27 Apr 2000 05:33:41 +0000 (05:33 +0000)
committerGurusamy Sarathy <gsar@cpan.org>
Thu, 27 Apr 2000 05:33:41 +0000 (05:33 +0000)
<simon.p.cozens@jp.pwcglobal.com>)

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@5959

13 files changed:
pod/perl56delta.pod
pod/perldebguts.pod
pod/perlfaq5.pod
pod/perlfork.pod
pod/perlfunc.pod
pod/perlipc.pod
pod/perllexwarn.pod
pod/perllocale.pod
pod/perlmodlib.pod
pod/perlnumber.pod
pod/perlopentut.pod
pod/perltodo.pod
pod/perltootc.pod

index 1ca4d7e..2117c70 100644 (file)
@@ -1539,7 +1539,7 @@ Rhapsody/Darwin is now supported.
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
-EPOC is is now supported (on Psion 5).
+EPOC is now supported (on Psion 5).
 
 =item *
 
 
 =item *
 
index 2bf6ea4..45c33c7 100644 (file)
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ F<INSTALL> podpage in the Perl source tree.
 
 For example, whenever you call Perl's built-in C<caller> function
 from the package DB, the arguments that the corresponding stack
 
 For example, whenever you call Perl's built-in C<caller> function
 from the package DB, the arguments that the corresponding stack
-frame was called with are copied to the the @DB::args array.  The
+frame was called with are copied to the @DB::args array.  The
 general mechanisms is enabled by calling Perl with the B<-d> switch, the
 following additional features are enabled (cf. L<perlvar/$^P>):
 
 general mechanisms is enabled by calling Perl with the B<-d> switch, the
 following additional features are enabled (cf. L<perlvar/$^P>):
 
@@ -154,7 +154,7 @@ L<perldebug/"Options"> for description of options parsed by
 C<DB::parse_options(string)>.  The function C<DB::dump_trace(skip[,
 count])> skips the specified number of frames and returns a list
 containing information about the calling frames (all of them, if
 C<DB::parse_options(string)>.  The function C<DB::dump_trace(skip[,
 count])> skips the specified number of frames and returns a list
 containing information about the calling frames (all of them, if
-C<count> is missing).  Each entry is reference to a hash with
+C<count> is missing).  Each entry is reference to a hash with
 keys C<context> (either C<.>, C<$>, or C<@>), C<sub> (subroutine
 name, or info about C<eval>), C<args> (C<undef> or a reference to
 an array), C<file>, and C<line>.
 keys C<context> (either C<.>, C<$>, or C<@>), C<sub> (subroutine
 name, or info about C<eval>), C<args> (C<undef> or a reference to
 an array), C<file>, and C<line>.
index 6ae7755..feb66a4 100644 (file)
@@ -841,7 +841,7 @@ you see someone do this:
 
 You should think long and hard about why you need everything loaded
 at once.  It's just not a scalable solution.  You might also find it
 
 You should think long and hard about why you need everything loaded
 at once.  It's just not a scalable solution.  You might also find it
-more fun to use the the standard DB_File module's $DB_RECNO bindings,
+more fun to use the standard DB_File module's $DB_RECNO bindings,
 which allow you to tie an array to a file so that accessing an element
 the array actually accesses the corresponding line in the file.
 
 which allow you to tie an array to a file so that accessing an element
 the array actually accesses the corresponding line in the file.
 
index a3dbf08..82ac689 100644 (file)
@@ -11,7 +11,7 @@ call is available, Perl's fork() simply calls it.
 On some platforms such as Windows where the fork() system call is not
 available, Perl can be built to emulate fork() at the interpreter level.
 While the emulation is designed to be as compatible as possible with the
 On some platforms such as Windows where the fork() system call is not
 available, Perl can be built to emulate fork() at the interpreter level.
 While the emulation is designed to be as compatible as possible with the
-real fork() at the the level of the Perl program, there are certain
+real fork() at the level of the Perl program, there are certain
 important differences that stem from the fact that all the pseudo child
 "processes" created this way live in the same real process as far as the
 operating system is concerned.
 important differences that stem from the fact that all the pseudo child
 "processes" created this way live in the same real process as far as the
 operating system is concerned.
index 6521f6e..17af812 100644 (file)
@@ -1863,7 +1863,7 @@ The exact meaning of the $gcos field varies but it usually contains
 the real name of the user (as opposed to the login name) and other
 information pertaining to the user.  Beware, however, that in many
 system users are able to change this information and therefore it
 the real name of the user (as opposed to the login name) and other
 information pertaining to the user.  Beware, however, that in many
 system users are able to change this information and therefore it
-cannot be trusted and therefore the $gcos is is tainted (see
+cannot be trusted and therefore the $gcos is tainted (see
 L<perlsec>).  The $passwd and $shell, user's encrypted password and
 login shell, are also tainted, because of the same reason.
 
 L<perlsec>).  The $passwd and $shell, user's encrypted password and
 login shell, are also tainted, because of the same reason.
 
@@ -2810,7 +2810,7 @@ otherwise it's necessary to protect any leading and trailing whitespace:
     open(FOO, "< $file\0");
 
 (this may not work on some bizzare filesystems).  One should
     open(FOO, "< $file\0");
 
 (this may not work on some bizzare filesystems).  One should
-conscientiously choose between the the I<magic> and 3-arguments form
+conscientiously choose between the I<magic> and 3-arguments form
 of open():
 
     open IN, $ARGV[0];
 of open():
 
     open IN, $ARGV[0];
@@ -3927,7 +3927,7 @@ GETALL, then ARG must be a variable which will hold the returned
 semid_ds structure or semaphore value array.  Returns like C<ioctl>:
 the undefined value for error, "C<0 but true>" for zero, or the actual
 return value otherwise.  The ARG must consist of a vector of native
 semid_ds structure or semaphore value array.  Returns like C<ioctl>:
 the undefined value for error, "C<0 but true>" for zero, or the actual
 return value otherwise.  The ARG must consist of a vector of native
-short integers, which may may be created with C<pack("s!",(0)x$nsem)>.
+short integers, which may be created with C<pack("s!",(0)x$nsem)>.
 See also C<IPC::SysV> and C<IPC::Semaphore> documentation.
 
 =item semget KEY,NSEMS,FLAGS
 See also C<IPC::SysV> and C<IPC::Semaphore> documentation.
 
 =item semget KEY,NSEMS,FLAGS
index 5b12fbe..9a7fbed 100644 (file)
@@ -922,7 +922,7 @@ For those preferring a higher-level interface to socket programming, the
 IO::Socket module provides an object-oriented approach.  IO::Socket is
 included as part of the standard Perl distribution as of the 5.004
 release.  If you're running an earlier version of Perl, just fetch
 IO::Socket module provides an object-oriented approach.  IO::Socket is
 included as part of the standard Perl distribution as of the 5.004
 release.  If you're running an earlier version of Perl, just fetch
-IO::Socket from CPAN, where you'll also find find modules providing easy
+IO::Socket from CPAN, where you'll also find modules providing easy
 interfaces to the following systems: DNS, FTP, Ident (RFC 931), NIS and
 NISPlus, NNTP, Ping, POP3, SMTP, SNMP, SSLeay, Telnet, and Time--just
 to name a few.
 interfaces to the following systems: DNS, FTP, Ident (RFC 931), NIS and
 NISPlus, NNTP, Ping, POP3, SMTP, SNMP, SSLeay, Telnet, and Time--just
 to name a few.
index cee1687..0052d33 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ flag B<-w> and the equivalent Perl variable, C<$^W>.
 
 The pragma works just like the existing "strict" pragma.
 This means that the scope of the warning pragma is limited to the
 
 The pragma works just like the existing "strict" pragma.
 This means that the scope of the warning pragma is limited to the
-enclosing block. It also means that that the pragma setting will not
+enclosing block. It also means that the pragma setting will not
 leak across files (via C<use>, C<require> or C<do>). This allows
 authors to independently define the degree of warning checks that will
 be applied to their module.
 leak across files (via C<use>, C<require> or C<do>). This allows
 authors to independently define the degree of warning checks that will
 be applied to their module.
@@ -195,7 +195,7 @@ or B<-X> command line flags.
 
 =back
 
 
 =back
 
-The combined effect of 3 & 4 is that it will will allow code which uses
+The combined effect of 3 & 4 is that it will allow code which uses
 the C<warnings> pragma to control the warning behavior of $^W-type
 code (using a C<local $^W=0>) if it really wants to, but not vice-versa.
 
 the C<warnings> pragma to control the warning behavior of $^W-type
 code (using a C<local $^W=0>) if it really wants to, but not vice-versa.
 
index be37385..55ccf44 100644 (file)
@@ -289,7 +289,7 @@ than the PERL_BADLANG approach, but setting LC_ALL (or
 other locale variables) may affect other programs as well, not just
 Perl.  In particular, external programs run from within Perl will see
 these changes.  If you make the new settings permanent (read on), all
 other locale variables) may affect other programs as well, not just
 Perl.  In particular, external programs run from within Perl will see
 these changes.  If you make the new settings permanent (read on), all
-programs you run see the changes.  See L<ENVIRONMENT> for for
+programs you run see the changes.  See L<ENVIRONMENT> for
 the full list of relevant environment variables and L<USING LOCALES>
 for their effects in Perl.  Effects in other programs are 
 easily deducible.  For example, the variable LC_COLLATE may well affect
 the full list of relevant environment variables and L<USING LOCALES>
 for their effects in Perl.  Effects in other programs are 
 easily deducible.  For example, the variable LC_COLLATE may well affect
index b42a2d8..164cb64 100644 (file)
@@ -823,7 +823,7 @@ to fix your manpath.  See L<perl> for details.
 
 Extension modules are written in C (or a mix of Perl and C).  They
 are usually dynamically loaded into Perl if and when you need them,
 
 Extension modules are written in C (or a mix of Perl and C).  They
 are usually dynamically loaded into Perl if and when you need them,
-but may also be be linked in statically.  Supported extension modules
+but may also be linked in statically.  Supported extension modules
 include Socket, Fcntl, and POSIX.
 
 Many popular C extension modules do not come bundled (at least, not
 include Socket, Fcntl, and POSIX.
 
 Many popular C extension modules do not come bundled (at least, not
index 498d962..d179d8c 100644 (file)
@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ finite decimal expansion.  Being strings, and thus of arbitrary length, there
 is no practical limit for the exponent or number of decimal digits for these
 numbers.  (But realize that what we are discussing the rules for just the
 I<storage> of these numbers.  The fact that you can store such "large" numbers
 is no practical limit for the exponent or number of decimal digits for these
 numbers.  (But realize that what we are discussing the rules for just the
 I<storage> of these numbers.  The fact that you can store such "large" numbers
-does not mean that that the I<operations> over these numbers will use all
+does not mean that the I<operations> over these numbers will use all
 of the significant digits.
 See L<"Numeric operators and numeric conversions"> for details.)
 
 of the significant digits.
 See L<"Numeric operators and numeric conversions"> for details.)
 
index 9cb9f67..5d2d48e 100644 (file)
@@ -309,7 +309,7 @@ C<O_DEFER>, C<O_SYNC>, C<O_ASYNC>, C<O_DSYNC>, C<O_RSYNC>,
 C<O_NOCTTY>, C<O_NDELAY> and C<O_LARGEFILE>.  Consult your open(2)
 manpage or its local equivalent for details.  (Note: starting from
 Perl release 5.6 the O_LARGEFILE flag, if available, is automatically
 C<O_NOCTTY>, C<O_NDELAY> and C<O_LARGEFILE>.  Consult your open(2)
 manpage or its local equivalent for details.  (Note: starting from
 Perl release 5.6 the O_LARGEFILE flag, if available, is automatically
-added to the sysopen() flags because large files are the the default.)
+added to the sysopen() flags because large files are the default.)
 
 Here's how to use C<sysopen> to emulate the simple C<open> calls we had
 before.  We'll omit the C<|| die $!> checks for clarity, but make sure
 
 Here's how to use C<sysopen> to emulate the simple C<open> calls we had
 before.  We'll omit the C<|| die $!> checks for clarity, but make sure
index 47febc8..f12b10f 100644 (file)
@@ -863,7 +863,7 @@ See Time::HiRes.
 
 =head2 autocroak?
 
 
 =head2 autocroak?
 
-This is the Fatal.pm module, so any builtin that that does
+This is the Fatal.pm module, so any builtin that does
 not return success automatically die()s.  If you're feeling brave, tie
 this in with the unified exceptions scheme.
 
 not return success automatically die()s.  If you're feeling brave, tie
 this in with the unified exceptions scheme.
 
index 64f8233..0bcb638 100644 (file)
@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ to which beginning Perl programmers attempt to put symbolic references,
 we have much better approaches, like nested hashes or hashes of arrays.
 But there's nothing wrong with using symbolic references to manipulate
 something that is meaningful only from the perspective of the package
 we have much better approaches, like nested hashes or hashes of arrays.
 But there's nothing wrong with using symbolic references to manipulate
 something that is meaningful only from the perspective of the package
-symbol symbol table, like method names or package variables.  In other
+symbol table, like method names or package variables.  In other
 words, when you want to refer to the symbol table, use symbol references.
 
 Clustering all the class attributes in one place has several advantages.
 words, when you want to refer to the symbol table, use symbol references.
 
 Clustering all the class attributes in one place has several advantages.