This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Fix nit in possessive quantifier descriptions.
authorRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Fri, 13 Oct 2006 09:15:43 +0000 (09:15 +0000)
committerRafael Garcia-Suarez <rgarciasuarez@gmail.com>
Fri, 13 Oct 2006 09:15:43 +0000 (09:15 +0000)
Add some =head3 headings.

p4raw-id: //depot/perl@29006

pod/perlre.pod

index c89d29f..d78db38 100644 (file)
@@ -82,6 +82,8 @@ X</x>
 
 =head2 Regular Expressions
 
+=head3 Metacharacters
+
 The patterns used in Perl pattern matching derive from supplied in
 the Version 8 regex routines.  (The routines are derived
 (distantly) from Henry Spencer's freely redistributable reimplementation
@@ -119,6 +121,8 @@ newline unless you use the C</s> modifier, which in effect tells Perl to pretend
 the string is a single line--even if it isn't.
 X<.> X</s>
 
+=head3 Quantifiers
+
 The following standard quantifiers are recognized:
 X<metacharacter> X<quantifier> X<*> X<+> X<?> X<{n}> X<{n,}> X<{n,m}>
 
@@ -160,11 +164,11 @@ sometimes undesirable. Thus Perl provides the "possesive" quantifier form
 as well.
 
     *+    Match 0 or more times and give nothing back
-    +?    Match 1 or more times and give nothing back
+    ++    Match 1 or more times and give nothing back
     ?+    Match 0 or 1 time and give nothing back
     {n}+   Match exactly n times and give nothing back (redundant)
-    {n,}?  Match at least n times and give nothing back
-    {n,m}? Match at least n but not more than m times and give nothing back
+    {n,}+  Match at least n times and give nothing back
+    {n,m}+ Match at least n but not more than m times and give nothing back
 
 For instance,
 
@@ -185,6 +189,8 @@ instance the above example could also be written as follows:
 
    /"(?>(?:(?>[^"\\]+)|\\.)*)"/
 
+=head3 Escape sequences
+
 Because patterns are processed as double quoted strings, the following
 also work:
 X<\t> X<\n> X<\r> X<\f> X<\a> X<\l> X<\u> X<\L> X<\U> X<\E> X<\Q>
@@ -217,6 +223,8 @@ An unescaped C<$> or C<@> interpolates the corresponding variable,
 while escaping will cause the literal string C<\$> to be matched.
 You'll need to write something like C<m/\Quser\E\@\Qhost/>.
 
+=head3 Character classes
+
 In addition, Perl defines the following:
 X<metacharacter>
 X<\w> X<\W> X<\s> X<\S> X<\d> X<\D> X<\X> X<\p> X<\P> X<\C>
@@ -397,6 +405,8 @@ only supported within a character class.  The POSIX character classes
 [.cc.] and [=cc=] are recognized but B<not> supported and trying to
 use them will cause an error.
 
+=head3 Assertions
+
 Perl defines the following zero-width assertions:
 X<zero-width assertion> X<assertion> X<regex, zero-width assertion>
 X<regexp, zero-width assertion>
@@ -437,6 +447,8 @@ such uses (C</.\G/g>, for example) currently cause problems, and
 it is recommended that you avoid such usage for now.
 X<\G>
 
+=head3 Capture buffers
+
 The bracketing construct C<( ... )> creates capture buffers.  To
 refer to the digit'th buffer use \<digit> within the
 match.  Outside the match use "$" instead of "\".  (The