This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Simplify double-nextstate optimisation
authorFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Tue, 14 Oct 2014 03:37:29 +0000 (20:37 -0700)
committerFather Chrysostomos <sprout@cpan.org>
Wed, 15 Oct 2014 05:01:46 +0000 (22:01 -0700)
commitf5b5c2a37af8753575a60bff8620560576946b4a
tree0263b77426c7cb3bd28868553c7656cefe94b173
parent8818afe890a4339f1db505ea767e5150ecbd0aa6
Simplify double-nextstate optimisation

Executing two nextstate ops in a row is equivalent to executing just
the second, so the peephole optimiser eliminates one of them.

The double-nextstate optimisation seems to have been written under
the assumption that the current op cannot be elided from the op_next
change, which is untrue, as we have oldop (the previous op in
the chain).

If the current op and the one following it are both nextstate ops,
then the contents of the second are moved over to the first and the
second is nulled.  Then current_op->op_next is adjusted to skip over
the newly-nulled op.

The the next op in the chain, the one that the first nextstate op now
points to, is processed.

The result is that every other nextstate in sequence of three or more
would be elided:

1        <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v ->2
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> null v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->2
2        <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->3
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> null v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->3
3        <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->4
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> null v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->4
4        <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->5

We don’t need to go through the complication of making the first next-
state equivalent to the second.  Just null the first one and adjust
the previous op’s pointer (oldop->op_next) to point to the second one.

Now all consecutive nextstates get nulled except the last:

-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->-
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->1
-        <0> ex-const v ->-
-        <0> ex-nextstate v ->1
-        <0> ex-const v ->1
1        <;> nextstate(main 1 -e:1) v:{ ->2

The only visible difference this makes is in B::Deparse output, but
this changed in 5.14 when the optimisation was first introduced, so I
think changing it again is acceptable:

$ perl5.12.4 -MO=Deparse -e 'use strict; 0; use warnings; 0'
use strict 'refs';
'???';
use warnings;
'???';
-e syntax OK

$ perl5.14.4 -MO=Deparse -e 'use strict; 0; use warnings; 0'
use warnings;
use strict 'refs';
'???';
;
'???';
-e syntax OK

$ ./perl -Ilib -MO=Deparse -e 'use strict; 0; use warnings; 0'
;
'???';
use warnings;
use strict;
'???';
-e syntax OK
ext/B/t/optree_specials.t
lib/B/Deparse.t
op.c
t/op/opt.t