This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
[patch] :utf8 updates
[perl5.git] / lib / open.pm
index d384b41..6415a08 100644 (file)
@@ -79,11 +79,7 @@ sub import {
                    unless defined $locale_encoding;
                (warnings::warnif("layer", "Cannot figure out an encoding to use"), last)
                    unless defined $locale_encoding;
-               if ($locale_encoding =~ /^utf-?8$/i) {
-                   $layer = "utf8";
-               } else {
-                   $layer = "encoding($locale_encoding)";
-               }
+                $layer = "encoding($locale_encoding)";
                $std = 1;
            } else {
                my $target = $layer;            # the layer name itself
@@ -151,7 +147,7 @@ open - perl pragma to set default PerlIO layers for input and output
 
     use open IO  => ':locale';
 
-    use open ':utf8';
+    use open ':encoding(utf8)';
     use open ':locale';
     use open ':encoding(iso-8859-7)';
 
@@ -193,8 +189,8 @@ For example:
 
 These are equivalent
 
-    use open ':utf8';
-    use open IO => ':utf8';
+    use open ':encoding(utf8)';
+    use open IO => ':encoding(utf8)';
 
 as are these
 
@@ -210,9 +206,6 @@ The matching of encoding names is loose: case does not matter, and
 many encodings have several aliases.  See L<Encode::Supported> for
 details and the list of supported locales.
 
-Note that C<:utf8> PerlIO layer must always be specified exactly like
-that, it is not subject to the loose matching of encoding names.
-
 When open() is given an explicit list of layers (with the three-arg
 syntax), they override the list declared using this pragma.
 
@@ -220,10 +213,10 @@ The C<:std> subpragma on its own has no effect, but if combined with
 the C<:utf8> or C<:encoding> subpragmas, it converts the standard
 filehandles (STDIN, STDOUT, STDERR) to comply with encoding selected
 for input/output handles.  For example, if both input and out are
-chosen to be C<:utf8>, a C<:std> will mean that STDIN, STDOUT, and
-STDERR are also in C<:utf8>.  On the other hand, if only output is
-chosen to be in C<< :encoding(koi8r) >>, a C<:std> will cause only the
-STDOUT and STDERR to be in C<koi8r>.  The C<:locale> subpragma
+chosen to be C<:encoding(utf8)>, a C<:std> will mean that STDIN, STDOUT,
+and STDERR are also in C<:encoding(utf8)>.  On the other hand, if only
+output is chosen to be in C<< :encoding(koi8r) >>, a C<:std> will cause
+only the STDOUT and STDERR to be in C<koi8r>.  The C<:locale> subpragma
 implicitly turns on C<:std>.
 
 The logic of C<:locale> is described in full in L<encoding>,