This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Remove bad advice : -M doesn't work on the #! line
[perl5.git] / ext / Encode / encoding.pm
index d5b32c7..efb0187 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 package encoding;
-our $VERSION = do { my @r = (q$Revision: 1.26 $ =~ /\d+/g); sprintf "%d."."%02d" x $#r, @r };
+our $VERSION = do { my @r = (q$Revision: 1.35 $ =~ /\d+/g); sprintf "%d."."%02d" x $#r, @r };
 
 use Encode;
 use strict;
@@ -7,10 +7,16 @@ use strict;
 BEGIN {
     if (ord("A") == 193) {
        require Carp;
-       Carp::croak "encoding pragma does not support EBCDIC platforms";
+       Carp::croak("encoding pragma does not support EBCDIC platforms");
     }
 }
 
+our $HAS_PERLIO = 0;
+eval { require PerlIO::encoding };
+unless ($@){
+    $HAS_PERLIO = (PerlIO::encoding->VERSION >= 0.02);
+}
+
 sub import {
     my $class = shift;
     my $name  = shift;
@@ -20,20 +26,24 @@ sub import {
     my $enc = find_encoding($name);
     unless (defined $enc) {
        require Carp;
-       Carp::croak "Unknown encoding '$name'";
+       Carp::croak("Unknown encoding '$name'");
     }
     unless ($arg{Filter}){
        ${^ENCODING} = $enc; # this is all you need, actually.
+       $HAS_PERLIO or return 1;
        for my $h (qw(STDIN STDOUT)){
            if ($arg{$h}){
-               unless (defined find_encoding($arg{h})) {
+               unless (defined find_encoding($arg{$h})) {
                    require Carp;
-                   Carp::croak "Unknown encoding for $h, '$arg{$h}'";
+                   Carp::croak("Unknown encoding for $h, '$arg{$h}'");
                }
-               eval qq{ binmode($h, ":encoding($arg{$h})") };
+               eval { binmode($h, ":encoding($arg{$h})") };
            }else{
                unless (exists $arg{$h}){
-                   eval qq{ binmode($h, ":encoding($name)") };
+                   eval { 
+                       no warnings 'uninitialized';
+                       binmode($h, ":encoding($name)");
+                   };
                }
            }
            if ($@){
@@ -46,8 +56,8 @@ sub import {
        eval {
            require Filter::Util::Call ;
            Filter::Util::Call->import ;
-           binmode(STDIN,  ":raw");
-           binmode(STDOUT, ":raw");
+           binmode(STDIN);
+           binmode(STDOUT);
            filter_add(sub{
                           my $status;
                            if (($status = filter_read()) > 0){
@@ -65,8 +75,13 @@ sub import {
 sub unimport{
     no warnings;
     undef ${^ENCODING};
-    binmode(STDIN,  ":raw");
-    binmode(STDOUT, ":raw");
+    if ($HAS_PERLIO){
+       binmode(STDIN,  ":raw");
+       binmode(STDOUT, ":raw");
+    }else{
+    binmode(STDIN);
+    binmode(STDOUT);
+    }
     if ($INC{"Filter/Util/Call.pm"}){
        eval { filter_del() };
     }
@@ -74,28 +89,27 @@ sub unimport{
 
 1;
 __END__
+
 =pod
 
 =head1 NAME
 
-encoding -  allows you to write your script in non-asii or non-utf8
+encoding - allows you to write your script in non-ascii or non-utf8
 
 =head1 SYNOPSIS
 
+  use encoding "greek";  # Perl like Greek to you?
   use encoding "euc-jp"; # Jperl!
 
-  # or you can even do this if your shell supports euc-jp
+  # or you can even do this if your shell supports your native encoding
 
-  > perl -Mencoding=euc-jp -e '...'
-
-  # or from the shebang line
-
-  #!/your/path/to/perl -Mencoding=euc-jp
+  perl -Mencoding=latin2 -e '...' # Feeling centrally European?
+  perl -Mencoding=euc-kr -e '...' # Or Korean?
 
   # more control
 
-  # A simple euc-jp => utf-8 converter
-  use encoding "euc-jp", STDOUT => "utf8";  while(<>){print};
+  # A simple euc-cn => utf-8 converter
+  use encoding "euc-cn", STDOUT => "utf8";  while(<>){print};
 
   # "no encoding;" supported (but not scoped!)
   no encoding;
@@ -107,27 +121,29 @@ encoding -  allows you to write your script in non-asii or non-utf8
 
 =head1 ABSTRACT
 
-Perl 5.6.0 has introduced Unicode support.  You could apply
-C<substr()> and regexes even to complex CJK characters -- so long as
-the script was written in UTF-8.  But back then text editors that
-support UTF-8 was still rare and many users rather chose to writer
-scripts in legacy encodings, given up whole new feature of Perl 5.6.
+Let's start with a bit of history: Perl 5.6.0 introduced Unicode
+support.  You could apply C<substr()> and regexes even to complex CJK
+characters -- so long as the script was written in UTF-8.  But back
+then, text editors that supported UTF-8 were still rare and many users
+instead chose to write scripts in legacy encodings, giving up a whole
+new feature of Perl 5.6.
 
-With B<encoding> pragma, you can write your script in any encoding you like
-(so long as the C<Encode> module supports it) and still enjoy Unicode
-support.  You can write a code in EUC-JP as follows;
+Rewind to the future: starting from perl 5.8.0 with the B<encoding>
+pragma, you can write your script in any encoding you like (so long
+as the C<Encode> module supports it) and still enjoy Unicode support.
+You can write code in EUC-JP as follows:
 
   my $Rakuda = "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC"; # Camel in Kanji
                #<-char-><-char->   # 4 octets
   s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
 
 And with C<use encoding "euc-jp"> in effect, it is the same thing as
-the code in UTF-8 as follow.
+the code in UTF-8:
 
-  my $Rakuda = "\x{99F1}\x{99DD}"; # who Unicode Characters
+  my $Rakuda = "\x{99F1}\x{99DD}"; # two Unicode Characters
   s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
 
-The B<encoding> pragma also modifies the file handle disciplines of
+The B<encoding> pragma also modifies the filehandle disciplines of
 STDIN, STDOUT, and STDERR to the specified encoding.  Therefore,
 
   use encoding "euc-jp";
@@ -136,10 +152,10 @@ STDIN, STDOUT, and STDERR to the specified encoding.  Therefore,
   $message =~ s/\bCamel\b/$Rakuda/;
   print $message;
 
-Will print "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC is the symbol of perl.\n", not
-"\x{99F1}\x{99DD} is the symbol of perl.\n".
+Will print "\xF1\xD1\xF1\xCC is the symbol of perl.\n",
+not "\x{99F1}\x{99DD} is the symbol of perl.\n".
 
-You can override this by giving extra arguments.  See below.
+You can override this by giving extra arguments; see below.
 
 =head1 USAGE
 
@@ -147,28 +163,28 @@ You can override this by giving extra arguments.  See below.
 
 =item use encoding [I<ENCNAME>] ;
 
-Sets the script encoding to I<ENCNAME> and file handle disciplines of
-STDIN, STDOUT are set to ":encoding(I<ENCNAME>)". Note STDERR will not 
-be changed.
+Sets the script encoding to I<ENCNAME>. Filehandle disciplines of
+STDIN and STDOUT are set to ":encoding(I<ENCNAME>)".  Note that STDERR
+will not be changed.
 
 If no encoding is specified, the environment variable L<PERL_ENCODING>
-is consulted. If no  encoding can be found, C<Unknown encoding 'I<ENCNAME>'>
-error will be thrown. 
+is consulted.  If no encoding can be found, the error C<Unknown encoding
+'I<ENCNAME>'> will be thrown.
 
 Note that non-STD file handles remain unaffected.  Use C<use open> or
 C<binmode> to change disciplines of those.
 
 =item use encoding I<ENCNAME> [ STDIN =E<gt> I<ENCNAME_IN> ...] ;
 
-You can also individually set encodings of STDIN and STDOUT via
-STDI<FH> =E<gt> I<ENCNAME_FH> form.  In this case, you cannot omit the
-first I<ENCNAME>.  C<STDI<FH> =E<gt> undef> turns IO transcoding
+You can also individually set encodings of STDIN and STDOUT via the
+C<< STDIN => I<ENCNAME> >> form.  In this case, you cannot omit the
+first I<ENCNAME>.  C<< STDIN => undef >> turns the IO transcoding
 completely off.
 
 =item no encoding;
 
-Unsets the script encoding and the disciplines of STDIN, STDOUT are
-reset to ":raw".
+Unsets the script encoding. The disciplines of STDIN, STDOUT are
+reset to ":raw" (the default unprocessed raw stream of bytes).
 
 =back
 
@@ -177,10 +193,16 @@ reset to ":raw".
 =head2 NOT SCOPED
 
 The pragma is a per script, not a per block lexical.  Only the last
-C<use encoding> or C<matters, and it affects B<the whole script>.
-Though <no encoding> pragma is supported and C<use encoding> can
-appear as many times as you want in a given script, the multiple use
-of this pragma is discouraged.
+C<use encoding> or C<no encoding> matters, and it affects 
+B<the whole script>.  However, the <no encoding> pragma is supported and 
+B<use encoding> can appear as many times as you want in a given script. 
+The multiple use of this pragma is discouraged.
+
+Because of this nature, the use of this pragma inside the module is
+strongly discouraged (because the influence of this pragma lasts not
+only for the module but the script that uses).  But if you have to,
+make sure you say C<no encoding> at the end of the module so you
+contain the influence of the pragma within the module.
 
 =head2 DO NOT MIX MULTIPLE ENCODINGS
 
@@ -198,9 +220,10 @@ but this will not
 
        "\xDF\x{100}" =~ /\x{3af}\x{100}/
 
-since the C<\xDF> on the left will B<not> be upgraded to C<\x{3af}>
-because of the C<\x{100}> on the left.  You should not be mixing your
-legacy data and Unicode in the same string.
+since the C<\xDF> (ISO 8859-7 GREEK SMALL LETTER IOTA WITH TONOS) on
+the left will B<not> be upgraded to C<\x{3af}> (Unicode GREEK SMALL
+LETTER IOTA WITH TONOS) because of the C<\x{100}> on the left.  You
+should not be mixing your legacy data and Unicode in the same string.
 
 This pragma also affects encoding of the 0x80..0xFF code point range:
 normally characters in that range are left as eight-bit bytes (unless
@@ -210,49 +233,49 @@ the C<encoding> pragma is present, even the 0x80..0xFF range always
 gets UTF-8 encoded.
 
 After all, the best thing about this pragma is that you don't have to
-resort to \x... just to spell your name in native encoding.  So feel
-free to put your strings in your encoding in quotes and regexes.
+resort to \x{....} just to spell your name in a native encoding.
+So feel free to put your strings in your encoding in quotes and
+regexes.
 
-=head1 NON-ASCII Identifiers and Filter option
+=head1 Non-ASCII Identifiers and Filter option
 
-The magic of C<use encoding> is not applied to the names of identifiers.
-In order to make C<${"4eba"}++> ($man++, where man is a single ideograph)
-work, you still need to write your script in UTF-8 or use a source filter.
+The magic of C<use encoding> is not applied to the names of
+identifiers.  In order to make C<${"\x{4eba}"}++> ($human++, where human
+is a single Han ideograph) work, you still need to write your script
+in UTF-8 or use a source filter.
 
-In other words, the same restriction as Jperl applies.
+In other words, the same restriction as with Jperl applies.
 
-If you dare experiment, however, you can try Fitlter option.
+If you dare to experiment, however, you can try the Filter option.
 
 =over 4
 
 =item use encoding I<ENCNAME> Filter=E<gt>1;
 
-This turns encoding pragma into source filter.  While the default
+This turns the encoding pragma into a source filter.  While the default
 approach just decodes interpolated literals (in qq() and qr()), this
-will apply source filter to entire source code.  In this case, STDIN
-and STDOUT remain untouched.
+will apply a source filter to the entire source code.  In this case,
+STDIN and STDOUT remain untouched.
 
 =back
 
-What does this mean?  Your source code behaves as if it is written 
-in UTF-8.  So even if your editor only supports Shift_JIS, for 
-example.  You can still try examples in Chapter 15 of 
-C<Programming Perl, 3rd Ed.>  For instance, you can use UTF-8
-identifiers.
+What does this mean?  Your source code behaves as if it is written in
+UTF-8.  So even if your editor only supports Shift_JIS, for example,
+you can still try examples in Chapter 15 of C<Programming Perl, 3rd
+Ed.>.  For instance, you can use UTF-8 identifiers.
 
 This option is significantly slower and (as of this writing) non-ASCII
 identifiers are not very stable WITHOUT this option and with the
 source code written in UTF-8.
 
-To make your script in legacy encoding work with minimum effort, do
-not use Filter=E<gt>1
-
+To make your script in legacy encoding work with minimum effort,
+do not use Filter=E<gt>1.
 
 =head1 EXAMPLE - Greekperl
 
     use encoding "iso 8859-7";
 
-    # The \xDF of ISO 8859-7 (Greek) is \x{3af} in Unicode.
+    # \xDF in ISO 8859-7 (Greek) is \x{3af} in Unicode.
 
     $a = "\xDF";
     $b = "\x{100}";
@@ -277,18 +300,19 @@ not use Filter=E<gt>1
     print "exa\n"  if "\x{3af}" cmp pack("C", 0xdf) == 0;
 
     # ... but pack/unpack C are not affected, in case you still
-    # want back to your native encoding
+    # want to go back to your native encoding
 
     print "zetta\n" if unpack("C", (pack("C", 0xdf))) == 0xdf;
 
 =head1 KNOWN PROBLEMS
 
-For native multibyte encodings (either fixed or variable length)
+For native multibyte encodings (either fixed or variable length),
 the current implementation of the regular expressions may introduce
-recoding errors for longer regular expression literals than 127 bytes.
+recoding errors for regular expression literals longer than 127 bytes.
 
 The encoding pragma is not supported on EBCDIC platforms.
-(Porters wanted.)
+(Porters who are willing and able to remove this limitation are
+welcome.)
 
 =head1 SEE ALSO