This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
remove trailing spaces in perlvar.pod
[perl5.git] / pod / perlvar.pod
index bcd8ecf..8068099 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ perlvar - Perl predefined variables
 
 =head2 Predefined Names
 
-The following names have special meaning to Perl.  Most 
+The following names have special meaning to Perl.  Most
 punctuation names have reasonable mnemonics, or analogs in the
 shells.  Nevertheless, if you wish to use long variable names,
 you need only say
@@ -153,7 +153,7 @@ The following functions:
 abs, alarm, chomp, chop, chr, chroot, cos, defined, eval, exp, glob,
 hex, int, lc, lcfirst, length, log, lstat, mkdir, oct, ord, pos, print,
 quotemeta, readlink, readpipe, ref, require, reverse (in scalar context only),
-rmdir, sin, split (on its second argument), sqrt, stat, study, uc, ucfirst, 
+rmdir, sin, split (on its second argument), sqrt, stat, study, uc, ucfirst,
 unlink, unpack.
 
 =item *
@@ -418,7 +418,7 @@ which handle you last accessed.
 =item $/
 X<$/> X<$RS> X<$INPUT_RECORD_SEPARATOR>
 
-The input record separator, newline by default.  This 
+The input record separator, newline by default.  This
 influences Perl's idea of what a "line" is.  Works like B<awk>'s RS
 variable, including treating empty lines as a terminator if set to
 the null string.  (An empty line cannot contain any spaces
@@ -481,7 +481,7 @@ buffered otherwise.  Setting this variable is useful primarily when
 you are outputting to a pipe or socket, such as when you are running
 a Perl program under B<rsh> and want to see the output as it's
 happening.  This has no effect on input buffering.  See L<perlfunc/getc>
-for that.  See L<perldoc/select> on how to select the output channel. 
+for that.  See L<perldoc/select> on how to select the output channel.
 See also L<IO::Handle>. (Mnemonic: when you want your pipes to be piping hot.)
 
 =item IO::Handle->output_field_separator EXPR
@@ -572,7 +572,7 @@ Used with formats.
 X<$=> X<$FORMAT_LINES_PER_PAGE>
 
 The current page length (printable lines) of the currently selected
-output channel.  Default is 60.  
+output channel.  Default is 60.
 Used with formats.
 (Mnemonic: = has horizontal lines.)
 
@@ -584,7 +584,7 @@ Used with formats.
 X<$-> X<$FORMAT_LINES_LEFT>
 
 The number of lines left on the page of the currently selected output
-channel.  
+channel.
 Used with formats.
 (Mnemonic: lines_on_page - lines_printed.)
 
@@ -622,7 +622,7 @@ After a match against some variable $var:
 
 =item C<$'> is the same as C<substr($var, $+[0])>
 
-=item C<$1> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[1], $+[1] - $-[1])>  
+=item C<$1> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[1], $+[1] - $-[1])>
 
 =item C<$2> is the same as C<substr($var, $-[2], $+[2] - $-[2])>
 
@@ -753,7 +753,7 @@ change the exit status of your program.  For example:
 
     END {
        $? = 1 if $? == 255;  # die would make it 255
-    } 
+    }
 
 Under VMS, the pragma C<use vmsish 'status'> makes C<$?> reflect the
 actual VMS exit status, instead of the default emulation of POSIX
@@ -856,7 +856,7 @@ reported by the Win32 call C<GetLastError()> which describes
 the last error from within the Win32 API.  Most Win32-specific
 code will report errors via C<$^E>.  ANSI C and Unix-like calls
 set C<errno> and so most portable Perl code will report errors
-via C<$!>. 
+via C<$!>.
 
 Caveats mentioned in the description of C<$!> generally apply to
 C<$^E>, also.  (Mnemonic: Extra error explanation.)
@@ -906,7 +906,7 @@ X<< $< >> X<$UID> X<$REAL_USER_ID>
 The real uid of this process.  (Mnemonic: it's the uid you came I<from>,
 if you're running setuid.)  You can change both the real uid and
 the effective uid at the same time by using POSIX::setuid().  Since
-changes to $< require a system call, check $! after a change attempt to 
+changes to $< require a system call, check $! after a change attempt to
 detect any possible errors.
 
 =item $EFFECTIVE_USER_ID
@@ -923,7 +923,7 @@ The effective uid of this process.  Example:
 
 You can change both the effective uid and the real uid at the same
 time by using POSIX::setuid().  Changes to $> require a check to $!
-to detect any possible errors after an attempted change. 
+to detect any possible errors after an attempted change.
 
 (Mnemonic: it's the uid you went I<to>, if you're running setuid.)
 C<< $< >> and C<< $> >> can be swapped only on machines
@@ -1569,13 +1569,13 @@ Here are some other examples:
     $SIG{"PIPE"} = Plumber();   # oops, what did Plumber() return??
 
 Be sure not to use a bareword as the name of a signal handler,
-lest you inadvertently call it. 
+lest you inadvertently call it.
 
 If your system has the sigaction() function then signal handlers are
 installed using it.  This means you get reliable signal handling.
 
-The default delivery policy of signals changed in Perl 5.8.0 from 
-immediate (also known as "unsafe") to deferred, also known as 
+The default delivery policy of signals changed in Perl 5.8.0 from
+immediate (also known as "unsafe") to deferred, also known as
 "safe signals".  See L<perlipc> for more information.
 
 Certain internal hooks can be also set using the %SIG hash.  The
@@ -1681,7 +1681,7 @@ the Perl process.  They correspond to errors detected by the Perl
 interpreter, C library, operating system, or an external program,
 respectively.
 
-To illustrate the differences between these variables, consider the 
+To illustrate the differences between these variables, consider the
 following Perl expression, which uses a single-quoted string:
 
     eval q{
@@ -1690,7 +1690,7 @@ following Perl expression, which uses a single-quoted string:
        close $pipe or die "bad pipe: $?, $!";
     };
 
-After execution of this statement all 4 variables may have been set.  
+After execution of this statement all 4 variables may have been set.
 
 C<$@> is set if the string to be C<eval>-ed did not compile (this
 may happen if C<open> or C<close> were imported with bad prototypes),
@@ -1702,7 +1702,7 @@ though.)
 When the eval() expression above is executed, open(), C<< <PIPE> >>,
 and C<close> are translated to calls in the C run-time library and
 thence to the operating system kernel.  C<$!> is set to the C library's
-C<errno> if one of these calls fails. 
+C<errno> if one of these calls fails.
 
 Under a few operating systems, C<$^E> may contain a more verbose
 error indicator, such as in this case, "CDROM tray not closed."
@@ -1767,7 +1767,7 @@ exempt in these ways:
 
 In particular, the new special C<${^_XYZ}> variables are always taken
 to be in package C<main>, regardless of any C<package> declarations
-presently in scope.  
+presently in scope.
 
 =head1 BUGS