This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Integrate mainline
[perl5.git] / pod / perlthrtut.pod
index b1f29c8..10a7c39 100644 (file)
@@ -272,6 +272,17 @@ messy, it's best to isolate the thread-specific code in its own
 module.  In our example above, that's what MyMod_threaded is, and it's
 only imported if we're running on a threaded Perl.
 
+=head2 A Note about the Examples
+
+Although thread support is considered to be stable, there are still a number
+of quirks that may startle you when you try out any of the examples below.
+In a real situation, care should be taken that all threads are finished
+executing before the program exits.  That care has B<not> been taken in these
+examples in the interest of simplicity.  Running these examples "as is" will
+produce error messages, usually caused by the fact that there are still
+threads running when the program exits.  You should not be alarmed by this.
+Future versions of Perl may fix this problem.
+
 =head2 Creating Threads
 
 The L<threads> package provides the tools you need to create new
@@ -302,7 +313,7 @@ part of the C<threads::new> call, like this:
     $Param3 = "foo"; 
     $thr = threads->new(\&sub1, "Param 1", "Param 2", $Param3); 
     $thr = threads->new(\&sub1, @ParamList); 
-    $thr = threads->new(\&sub1, qw(Param1 Param2 $Param3));
+    $thr = threads->new(\&sub1, qw(Param1 Param2 Param3));
 
     sub sub1 { 
         my @InboundParameters = @_; 
@@ -331,12 +342,12 @@ Perl's threading package provides the yield() function that does
 this. yield() is pretty straightforward, and works like this:
 
     use threads; 
-       
+
     sub loop {
            my $thread = shift;
            my $foo = 50;
            while($foo--) { print "in thread $thread\n" }
-           threads->yield();
+           threads->yield;
            $foo = 50;
            while($foo--) { print "in thread $thread\n" }
     }
@@ -344,7 +355,7 @@ this. yield() is pretty straightforward, and works like this:
     my $thread1 = threads->new(\&loop, 'first');
     my $thread2 = threads->new(\&loop, 'second');
     my $thread3 = threads->new(\&loop, 'third');
-       
+
 It is important to remember that yield() is only a hint to give up the CPU,
 it depends on your hardware, OS and threading libraries what actually happens.
 Therefore it is important to note that one should not build the scheduling of 
@@ -433,7 +444,7 @@ L<threads::shared> module and the C< : shared> attribute:
     my $foo : shared = 1;
     my $bar = 1;
     threads->new(sub { $foo++; $bar++ })->join;
-    
+
     print "$foo\n";  #prints 2 since $foo is shared
     print "$bar\n";  #prints 1 since $bar is not shared
 
@@ -502,8 +513,8 @@ possibility of error:
     my $c : shared;
     my $thr1 = threads->create(sub { $b = $a; $a = $b + 1; }); 
     my $thr2 = threads->create(sub { $c = $a; $a = $c + 1; });
-    $thr1->join();
-    $thr2->join();
+    $thr1->join;
+    $thr2->join;
 
 Two threads both access $a.  Each thread can potentially be interrupted
 at any point, or be executed in any order.  At the end, $a could be 3
@@ -531,7 +542,7 @@ techniques such as queues, which remove some of the hard work involved.
 The lock() function takes a shared variable and puts a lock on it.  
 No other thread may lock the variable until the the variable is unlocked
 by the thread holding the lock. Unlocking happens automatically
-when the locking thread exists the outermost block that contains
+when the locking thread exits the outermost block that contains
 C<lock()> function.  Using lock() is straightforward: this example has
 several threads doing some calculations in parallel, and occasionally
 updating a running total:
@@ -547,7 +558,7 @@ updating a running total:
            # (... do some calculations and set $result ...)
            {
                lock($total); # block until we obtain the lock
-               $total += $result
+               $total += $result;
            } # lock implicitly released at end of scope
            last if $result == 0;
        }
@@ -587,7 +598,7 @@ lock() on the variable goes out of scope. For example:
        {
            {
                lock($x); # wait for lock
-               lock($x): # NOOP - we already have the lock
+               lock($x); # NOOP - we already have the lock
                {
                    lock($x); # NOOP
                    {
@@ -673,7 +684,7 @@ this:
     use threads; 
     use threads::shared::queue;
 
-    my $DataQueue = threads::shared::queue->new()
+    my $DataQueue = threads::shared::queue->new; 
     $thr = threads->new(sub { 
         while ($DataElement = $DataQueue->dequeue) { 
             print "Popped $DataElement off the queue\n";
@@ -685,7 +696,7 @@ this:
     $DataQueue->enqueue(\$thr); 
     sleep 10; 
     $DataQueue->enqueue(undef);
-    $thr->join();
+    $thr->join;
 
 You create the queue with C<new threads::shared::queue>.  Then you can
 add lists of scalars onto the end with enqueue(), and pop scalars off
@@ -738,9 +749,9 @@ gives a quick demonstration:
         } 
     }
 
-    $thr1->join();
-    $thr2->join();
-    $thr3->join();
+    $thr1->join;
+    $thr2->join;
+    $thr3->join;
 
 The three invocations of the subroutine all operate in sync.  The
 semaphore, though, makes sure that only one thread is accessing the
@@ -770,8 +781,8 @@ of these defaults simply by passing in different values:
         $semaphore->up(5); # Increment the counter by five
     }
 
-    $thr1->detach();
-    $thr2->detach();
+    $thr1->detach;
+    $thr2->detach;
 
 If down() attempts to decrement the counter below zero, it blocks until
 the counter is large enough.  Note that while a semaphore can be created
@@ -881,7 +892,7 @@ things we've covered.  This program finds prime numbers using threads.
     14 } 
     15
     16 $stream->enqueue(undef);
-    17 $kid->join();
+    17 $kid->join;
     18
     19 sub check_num {
     20     my ($upstream, $cur_prime) = @_;
@@ -897,7 +908,7 @@ things we've covered.  This program finds prime numbers using threads.
     30         }
     31     } 
     32     $downstream->enqueue(undef) if $kid;
-    33     $kid->join()                if $kid;
+    33     $kid->join          if $kid;
     34 }
 
 This program uses the pipeline model to generate prime numbers.  Each