This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
perlretut: #109408
[perl5.git] / pod / perlretut.pod
index 226b0ff..bf4ab3b 100644 (file)
@@ -869,7 +869,7 @@ with one higher than the maximum reached across all the alternatives.
 
 =head2 Position information
 
-In addition to what was matched, Perl (since 5.6.0) also provides the
+In addition to what was matched, Perl also provides the
 positions of what was matched as contents of the C<@-> and C<@+>
 arrays. C<$-[0]> is the position of the start of the entire match and
 C<$+[0]> is the position of the end. Similarly, C<$-[n]> is the
@@ -1874,8 +1874,8 @@ work if they appear in a regular expression embedded directly in a
 program, but not when contained in a string that is interpolated in a
 pattern.
 
-With the advent of 5.6.0, Perl regexps can handle more than just the
-standard ASCII character set.  Perl now supports I<Unicode>, a standard
+Perl regexps can handle more than just the
+standard ASCII character set.  Perl supports I<Unicode>, a standard
 for representing the alphabets from virtually all of the world's written
 languages, and a host of symbols.  Perl's text strings are Unicode strings, so
 they can contain characters with a value (codepoint or character number) higher
@@ -1926,13 +1926,13 @@ Consortium, L<http://www.unicode.org/charts/charindex.html>; explanatory
 material with links to other resources at
 L<http://www.unicode.org/standard/where>.
 
-The answer to requirement 2) is, as of 5.6.0, that a regexp (mostly)
-uses Unicode characters.  (The "mostly" is for messy backward
+The answer to requirement 2) is that a regexp (mostly)
+uses Unicode characters.  The "mostly" is for messy backward
 compatibility reasons, but starting in Perl 5.14, any regex compiled in
 the scope of a C<use feature 'unicode_strings'> (which is automatically
 turned on within the scope of a C<use 5.012> or higher) will turn that
 "mostly" into "always".  If you want to handle Unicode properly, you
-should ensure that C<'unicode_strings'> is turned on.)
+should ensure that C<'unicode_strings'> is turned on.
 Internally, this is encoded to bytes using either UTF-8 or a native 8
 bit encoding, depending on the history of the string, but conceptually
 it is a sequence of characters, not bytes. See L<perlunitut> for a