This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Move more URLs from http:// to https://
[perl5.git] / README.win32
index 9e87709..01731fa 100644 (file)
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ polling loop.
 
 A port of dmake for Windows is available from:
 
-L<http://search.cpan.org/dist/dmake/>
+L<https://search.cpan.org/dist/dmake/>
 
 Fetch and install dmake somewhere on your path.
 
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ everything necessary to build Perl, rather than requiring a separate download
 of the Windows SDK like previous versions did.
 
 These packages can be downloaded by searching in the Download Center at
-L<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.aspx?displaylang=en>.  (Providing exact
+L<https://www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.aspx?displaylang=en>.  (Providing exact
 links to these packages has proven a pointless task because the links keep on
 changing so often.)
 
@@ -220,7 +220,7 @@ Framework Redistributable" to be installed first.  This can be downloaded and
 installed separately, but is included in the "Visual C++ Toolkit 2003" anyway.
 
 These packages can all be downloaded by searching in the Download Center at
-L<http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.aspx?displaylang=en>.  (Providing exact
+L<https://www.microsoft.com/downloads/search.aspx?displaylang=en>.  (Providing exact
 links to these packages has proven a pointless task because the links keep on
 changing so often.)
 
@@ -449,7 +449,7 @@ in the May 2019 Update, as explained here: L<https://developercommunity.visualst
 
 If you build with certain versions (e.g. 4.8.1) of gcc from www.mingw.org then
 F<ext/POSIX/t/time.t> may fail test 17 due to a known bug in those gcc builds:
-see L<http://sourceforge.net/p/mingw/bugs/2152/>.
+see L<https://sourceforge.net/p/mingw/bugs/2152/>.
 
 Some test failures may occur if you use a command shell other than the
 native "cmd.exe", or if you are building from a path that contains
@@ -568,7 +568,7 @@ and other special characters in arguments.
 The Windows documentation describes the shell parsing rules here:
 L<http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/xp/all/proddocs/en-us/cmd.mspx?mfr=true>
 and the C runtime parsing rules here:
-L<http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/17w5ykft%28v=VS.100%29.aspx>.
+L<https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/17w5ykft%28v=VS.100%29.aspx>.
 
 Here are some further observations based on experiments: The C runtime
 breaks arguments at spaces and passes them to programs in argc/argv.
@@ -637,11 +637,11 @@ quoted.
 
 The Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) offers a wealth
 of extensions, some of which require a C compiler to build.
-Look in L<http://www.cpan.org/> for more information on CPAN.
+Look in L<https://www.cpan.org/> for more information on CPAN.
 
 Note that not all of the extensions available from CPAN may work
 in the Windows environment; you should check the information at
-L<http://www.cpantesters.org/> before investing too much effort into
+L<https://www.cpantesters.org/> before investing too much effort into
 porting modules that don't readily build.
 
 Most extensions (whether they require a C compiler or not) can
@@ -667,7 +667,7 @@ L<http://download.microsoft.com/download/vc15/Patch/1.52/W95/EN-US/nmake15.exe>
 Another option is to use the make written in Perl, available from
 CPAN.
 
-L<http://www.cpan.org/modules/by-module/Make/>
+L<https://www.cpan.org/modules/by-module/Make/>
 
 You may also use dmake or gmake.  See L</"Make"> above on how to get it.