This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
Take a larger margin to prevent 'X' failures in smokes
[perl5.git] / t / op / rand.t
index 6031f42..eb29ff9 100755 (executable)
 #!./perl
 
 #!./perl
 
-# From: kgb@ast.cam.ac.uk (Karl Glazebrook)
+# From Tom Phoenix <rootbeer@teleport.com> 22 Feb 1997
+# Based upon a test script by kgb@ast.cam.ac.uk (Karl Glazebrook)
 
 
-print "1..6\n";
+# Looking for the hints? You're in the right place. 
+# The hints are near each test, so search for "TEST #", where
+# the pound sign is replaced by the number of the test.
 
 
-srand;
+# I'd like to include some more robust tests, but anything
+# too subtle to be detected here would require a time-consuming
+# test. Also, of course, we're here to detect only flaws in Perl;
+# if there are flaws in the underlying system rand, that's not
+# our responsibility. But if you want better tests, see
+# The Art of Computer Programming, Donald E. Knuth, volume 2,
+# chapter 3. ISBN 0-201-03822-6 (v. 2)
 
 
-$m=$max=0; 
-for(1..1000){ 
-   $n = rand(1);
-   if ($n<0) {
-       print "not ok 1\n# The value of randbits is likely too low in config.sh\n";
-       exit
-   }
-   $m += $n;
-   $max = $n if $n > $max;
+BEGIN {
+    chdir "t" if -d "t";
+    @INC = qw(. ../lib);
 }
 }
-$m=$m/1000;
-print "ok 1\n";
 
 
-$off = log($max)/log(2);
-if ($off > 0) { $off = int(.5+$off) }
-    else { $off = - int(.5-$off) }
-print "# Consider adding $off to randbits\n" if $off > 0;
-print "# Consider subtracting ", -$off, " from randbits\n" if $off < 0;
+use strict;
+use Config;
 
 
-if ($m<0.4) {
-    print "not ok 2\n# The value of randbits is likely too high in config.sh\n";
-}
-elsif ($m>0.6) {
-    print "not ok 2\n# The value of randbits is likely too low in config.sh\n";
-}else{
-    print "ok 2\n";
-}
+require "test.pl";
+plan(tests => 8);
 
 
-srand;
 
 
-$m=0; 
-for(1..1000){ 
-   $n = rand(100);
-   if ($n<0 || $n>=100) {
-       print "not ok 3\n";
-       exit
-   }
-   $m += $n;
+my $reps = 15000;      # How many times to try rand each time.
+                       # May be changed, but should be over 500.
+                       # The more the better! (But slower.)
 
 
+sub bits ($) {
+    # Takes a small integer and returns the number of one-bits in it.
+    my $total;
+    my $bits = sprintf "%o", $_[0];
+    while (length $bits) {
+       $total += (0,1,1,2,1,2,2,3)[chop $bits];        # Oct to bits
+    }
+    $total;
 }
 }
-$m=$m/1000;
-print "ok 3\n";
 
 
-if ($m<40 || $m>60) {
-    print "not ok 4\n";
-}else{
-    print "ok 4\n";
+# First, let's see whether randbits is set right
+{
+    my($max, $min, $sum);      # Characteristics of rand
+    my($off, $shouldbe);       # Problems with randbits
+    my($dev, $bits);           # Number of one bits
+    my $randbits = $Config{randbits};
+    $max = $min = rand(1);
+    for (1..$reps) {
+       my $n = rand(1);
+       if ($n < 0.0 or $n >= 1.0) {
+           print <<EOM;
+# WHOA THERE!  \$Config{drand01} is set to '$Config{drand01}',
+# but that apparently produces values < 0.0 or >= 1.0.
+# Make sure \$Config{drand01} is a valid expression in the
+# C-language, and produces values in the range [0.0,1.0).
+#
+# I give up.
+EOM
+           exit;
+       }
+       $sum += $n;
+       $bits += bits($n * 256);        # Don't be greedy; 8 is enough
+                   # It's too many if randbits is less than 8!
+                   # But that should never be the case... I hope.
+                   # Note: If you change this, you must adapt the
+                   # formula for absolute standard deviation, below.
+       $max = $n if $n > $max;
+       $min = $n if $n < $min;
+    }
+
+
+    # This test checks for one of Perl's most frequent
+    # mis-configurations. Your system's documentation
+    # for rand(2) should tell you what value you need
+    # for randbits. Usually the diagnostic message
+    # has the right value as well. Just fix it and
+    # recompile, and you'll usually be fine. (The main 
+    # reason that the diagnostic message might get the
+    # wrong value is that Config.pm is incorrect.)
+    #
+    unless (ok( !$max <= 0 or $max >= (2 ** $randbits))) {# Just in case...
+       print <<DIAG;
+# max=[$max] min=[$min]
+# This perl was compiled with randbits=$randbits
+# which is _way_ off. Or maybe your system rand is broken,
+# or your C compiler can't multiply, or maybe Martians
+# have taken over your computer. For starters, see about
+# trying a better value for randbits, probably smaller.
+DIAG
+
+       # If that isn't the problem, we'll have
+       # to put d_martians into Config.pm 
+       print "# Skipping remaining tests until randbits is fixed.\n";
+       exit;
+    }
+
+    $off = log($max) / log(2);                 # log2
+    $off = int($off) + ($off > 0);             # Next more positive int
+    unless (is( $off, 0 )) {
+       $shouldbe = $Config{randbits} + $off;
+       print "# max=[$max] min=[$min]\n";
+       print "# This perl was compiled with randbits=$randbits on $^O.\n";
+       print "# Consider using randbits=$shouldbe instead.\n";
+       # And skip the remaining tests; they would be pointless now.
+       print "# Skipping remaining tests until randbits is fixed.\n";
+       exit;
+    }
+
+
+    # This should always be true: 0 <= rand(1) < 1
+    # If this test is failing, something is seriously wrong,
+    # either in perl or your system's rand function.
+    #
+    unless (ok( !($min < 0 or $max >= 1) )) {  # Slightly redundant...
+       print "# min too low\n" if $min < 0;
+       print "# max too high\n" if $max >= 1;
+    }
+
+
+    # This is just a crude test. The average number produced
+    # by rand should be about one-half. But once in a while
+    # it will be relatively far away. Note: This test will
+    # occasionally fail on a perfectly good system!
+    # See the hints for test 4 to see why.
+    #
+    $sum /= $reps;
+    unless (ok( !($sum < 0.4 or $sum > 0.6) )) {
+       print "# Average random number is far from 0.5\n";
+    }
+
+
+    #   NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE
+    # This test will fail .1% of the time on a normal system.
+    #                          also
+    # This test asks you to see these hints 100% of the time!
+    #   NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE NOTE
+    #
+    # There is probably no reason to be alarmed that
+    # something is wrong with your rand function. But,
+    # if you're curious or if you can't help being 
+    # alarmed, keep reading.
+    #
+    # This is a less-crude test than test 3. But it has
+    # the same basic flaw: Unusually distributed random
+    # values should occasionally appear in every good
+    # random number sequence. (If you flip a fair coin
+    # twenty times every day, you'll see it land all
+    # heads about one time in a million days, on the
+    # average. That might alarm you if you saw it happen
+    # on the first day!)
+    #
+    # So, if this test failed on you once, run it a dozen
+    # times. If it keeps failing, it's likely that your
+    # rand is bogus. If it keeps passing, it's likely
+    # that the one failure was bogus. If it's a mix,
+    # read on to see about how to interpret the tests.
+    #
+    # The number printed in square brackets is the
+    # standard deviation, a statistical measure
+    # of how unusual rand's behavior seemed. It should
+    # fall in these ranges with these *approximate*
+    # probabilities:
+    #
+    #          under 1         68.26% of the time
+    #          1-2             27.18% of the time
+    #          2-3              4.30% of the time
+    #          over 3           0.26% of the time
+    #
+    # If the numbers you see are not scattered approximately
+    # (not exactly!) like that table, check with your vendor
+    # to find out what's wrong with your rand. Or with this
+    # algorithm. :-)
+    #
+    # Calculating absoulute standard deviation for number of bits set
+    # (eight bits per rep)
+    $dev = abs ($bits - $reps * 4) / sqrt($reps * 2);
+
+    ok( $dev < 3.3 );
+
+    if ($dev < 1.96) {
+       print "# Your rand seems fine. If this test failed\n";
+       print "# previously, you may want to run it again.\n";
+    } elsif ($dev < 2.575) {
+       print "# This is ok, but suspicious. But it will happen\n";
+       print "# one time out of 25, more or less.\n";
+       print "# You should run this test again to be sure.\n";
+    } elsif ($dev < 3.3) {
+       print "# This is very suspicious. It will happen only\n";
+       print "# about one time out of 100, more or less.\n";
+       print "# You should run this test again to be sure.\n";
+    } elsif ($dev < 3.9) {
+       print "# This is VERY suspicious. It will happen only\n";
+       print "# about one time out of 1000, more or less.\n";
+       print "# You should run this test again to be sure.\n";
+    } else {
+       print "# This is VERY VERY suspicious.\n";
+       print "# Your rand seems to be bogus.\n";
+    }
+    print "#\n# If you are having random number troubles,\n";
+    print "# see the hints within the test script for more\n";
+    printf "# information on why this might fail. [ %.3f ]\n", $dev;
 }
 
 }
 
-srand(3.14159);
-$r = rand;
-srand(3.14159);
-print "# srand is not consistent.\nnot " if rand != $r;
-print "ok 5\n";
 
 
-print "# rand is unchanging!\nnot " if rand == $r;
-print "ok 6\n";
+# Now, let's see whether rand accepts its argument
+{
+    my($max, $min);
+    $max = $min = rand(100);
+    for (1..$reps) {
+       my $n = rand(100);
+       $max = $n if $n > $max;
+       $min = $n if $n < $min;
+    }
+
+    # This test checks to see that rand(100) really falls 
+    # within the range 0 - 100, and that the numbers produced
+    # have a reasonably-large range among them.
+    #
+    unless ( ok( !($min < 0 or $max >= 100 or ($max - $min) < 65) ) ) {
+       print "# min too low\n" if $min < 0;
+       print "# max too high\n" if $max >= 100;
+       print "# range too narrow\n" if ($max - $min) < 65;
+    }
+
+
+    # This test checks that rand without an argument
+    # is equivalent to rand(1).
+    #
+    $_ = 12345;                # Just for fun.
+    srand 12345;
+    my $r = rand;
+    srand 12345;
+    is(rand(1),  $r,  'rand() without args is rand(1)');
+
+
+    # This checks that rand without an argument is not
+    # rand($_). (In case somebody got overzealous.)
+    # 
+    ok($r < 1,        'rand() without args is under 1');
+}