This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
ee524f991e3d828999acecbe5760308fdb1492dd
[perl5.git] / pod / perlgit.pod
1 =encoding utf8
2
3 =for comment
4 Consistent formatting of this file is achieved with:
5   perl ./Porting/podtidy pod/perlgit.pod
6
7 =head1 NAME
8
9 perlgit - Detailed information about git and the Perl repository
10
11 =head1 DESCRIPTION
12
13 This document provides details on using git to develop Perl. If you are
14 just interested in working on a quick patch, see L<perlhack> first.
15 This document is intended for people who are regular contributors to
16 Perl, including those with write access to the git repository.
17
18 =head1 CLONING THE REPOSITORY
19
20 All of Perl's source code is kept centrally in a Git repository at
21 I<perl5.git.perl.org>.
22
23 You can make a read-only clone of the repository by running:
24
25   % git clone git://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git perl
26
27 This uses the git protocol (port 9418).
28
29 If you cannot use the git protocol for firewall reasons, you can also
30 clone via http, though this is much slower:
31
32   % git clone http://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git perl
33
34 =head1 WORKING WITH THE REPOSITORY
35
36 Once you have changed into the repository directory, you can inspect
37 it. After a clone the repository will contain a single local branch,
38 which will be the current branch as well, as indicated by the asterisk.
39
40   % git branch
41   * blead
42
43 Using the -a switch to C<branch> will also show the remote tracking
44 branches in the repository:
45
46   % git branch -a
47   * blead
48     origin/HEAD
49     origin/blead
50   ...
51
52 The branches that begin with "origin" correspond to the "git remote"
53 that you cloned from (which is named "origin"). Each branch on the
54 remote will be exactly tracked by these branches. You should NEVER do
55 work on these remote tracking branches. You only ever do work in a
56 local branch. Local branches can be configured to automerge (on pull)
57 from a designated remote tracking branch. This is the case with the
58 default branch C<blead> which will be configured to merge from the
59 remote tracking branch C<origin/blead>.
60
61 You can see recent commits:
62
63   % git log
64
65 And pull new changes from the repository, and update your local
66 repository (must be clean first)
67
68   % git pull
69
70 Assuming we are on the branch C<blead> immediately after a pull, this
71 command would be more or less equivalent to:
72
73   % git fetch
74   % git merge origin/blead
75
76 In fact if you want to update your local repository without touching
77 your working directory you do:
78
79   % git fetch
80
81 And if you want to update your remote-tracking branches for all defined
82 remotes simultaneously you can do
83
84   % git remote update
85
86 Neither of these last two commands will update your working directory,
87 however both will update the remote-tracking branches in your
88 repository.
89
90 To make a local branch of a remote branch:
91
92   % git checkout -b maint-5.10 origin/maint-5.10
93
94 To switch back to blead:
95
96   % git checkout blead
97
98 =head2 Finding out your status
99
100 The most common git command you will use will probably be
101
102   % git status
103
104 This command will produce as output a description of the current state
105 of the repository, including modified files and unignored untracked
106 files, and in addition it will show things like what files have been
107 staged for the next commit, and usually some useful information about
108 how to change things. For instance the following:
109
110   $ git status
111   # On branch blead
112   # Your branch is ahead of 'origin/blead' by 1 commit.
113   #
114   # Changes to be committed:
115   #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
116   #
117   #       modified:   pod/perlgit.pod
118   #
119   # Changed but not updated:
120   #   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
121   #
122   #       modified:   pod/perlgit.pod
123   #
124   # Untracked files:
125   #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
126   #
127   #       deliberate.untracked
128
129 This shows that there were changes to this document staged for commit,
130 and that there were further changes in the working directory not yet
131 staged. It also shows that there was an untracked file in the working
132 directory, and as you can see shows how to change all of this. It also
133 shows that there is one commit on the working branch C<blead> which has
134 not been pushed to the C<origin> remote yet. B<NOTE>: that this output
135 is also what you see as a template if you do not provide a message to
136 C<git commit>.
137
138 =head2 Patch workflow
139
140 First, please read L<perlhack> for details on hacking the Perl core.
141 That document covers many details on how to create a good patch.
142
143 If you already have a Perl repository, you should ensure that you're on
144 the I<blead> branch, and your repository is up to date:
145
146   % git checkout blead
147   % git pull
148
149 It's preferable to patch against the latest blead version, since this
150 is where new development occurs for all changes other than critical bug
151 fixes. Critical bug fix patches should be made against the relevant
152 maint branches, or should be submitted with a note indicating all the
153 branches where the fix should be applied.
154
155 Now that we have everything up to date, we need to create a temporary
156 new branch for these changes and switch into it:
157
158   % git checkout -b orange
159
160 which is the short form of
161
162   % git branch orange
163   % git checkout orange
164
165 Creating a topic branch makes it easier for the maintainers to rebase
166 or merge back into the master blead for a more linear history. If you
167 don't work on a topic branch the maintainer has to manually cherry pick
168 your changes onto blead before they can be applied.
169
170 That'll get you scolded on perl5-porters, so don't do that. Be Awesome.
171
172 Then make your changes. For example, if Leon Brocard changes his name
173 to Orange Brocard, we should change his name in the AUTHORS file:
174
175   % perl -pi -e 's{Leon Brocard}{Orange Brocard}' AUTHORS
176
177 You can see what files are changed:
178
179   % git status
180   # On branch orange
181   # Changes to be committed:
182   #   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
183   #
184   #    modified:   AUTHORS
185   #
186
187 And you can see the changes:
188
189   % git diff
190   diff --git a/AUTHORS b/AUTHORS
191   index 293dd70..722c93e 100644
192   --- a/AUTHORS
193   +++ b/AUTHORS
194   @@ -541,7 +541,7 @@    Lars Hecking                   <lhecking@nmrc.ucc.ie>
195    Laszlo Molnar                  <laszlo.molnar@eth.ericsson.se>
196    Leif Huhn                      <leif@hale.dkstat.com>
197    Len Johnson                    <lenjay@ibm.net>
198   -Leon Brocard                   <acme@astray.com>
199   +Orange Brocard                 <acme@astray.com>
200    Les Peters                     <lpeters@aol.net>
201    Lesley Binks                   <lesley.binks@gmail.com>
202    Lincoln D. Stein               <lstein@cshl.org>
203
204 Now commit your change locally:
205
206   % git commit -a -m 'Rename Leon Brocard to Orange Brocard'
207   Created commit 6196c1d: Rename Leon Brocard to Orange Brocard
208    1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 1 deletions(-)
209
210 The C<-a> option is used to include all files that git tracks that you
211 have changed. If at this time, you only want to commit some of the
212 files you have worked on, you can omit the C<-a> and use the command
213 C<S<git add I<FILE ...>>> before doing the commit. C<S<git add
214 --interactive>> allows you to even just commit portions of files
215 instead of all the changes in them.
216
217 The C<-m> option is used to specify the commit message. If you omit it,
218 git will open a text editor for you to compose the message
219 interactively. This is useful when the changes are more complex than
220 the sample given here, and, depending on the editor, to know that the
221 first line of the commit message doesn't exceed the 50 character legal
222 maximum.
223
224 Once you've finished writing your commit message and exited your
225 editor, git will write your change to disk and tell you something like
226 this:
227
228   Created commit daf8e63: explain git status and stuff about remotes
229    1 files changed, 83 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
230
231 If you re-run C<git status>, you should see something like this:
232
233   % git status
234   # On branch blead
235   # Your branch is ahead of 'origin/blead' by 2 commits.
236   #
237   # Untracked files:
238   #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
239   #
240   #       deliberate.untracked
241   nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)
242
243 When in doubt, before you do anything else, check your status and read
244 it carefully, many questions are answered directly by the git status
245 output.
246
247 You can examine your last commit with:
248
249   % git show HEAD
250
251 and if you are not happy with either the description or the patch
252 itself you can fix it up by editing the files once more and then issue:
253
254   % git commit -a --amend
255
256 Now you should create a patch file for all your local changes:
257
258   % git format-patch -M origin..
259   0001-Rename-Leon-Brocard-to-Orange-Brocard.patch
260
261 You should now send an email to
262 L<perlbug@perl.org|mailto:perlbug@perl.org> with a description of your
263 changes, and include this patch file as an attachment. In addition to
264 being tracked by RT, mail to perlbug will automatically be forwarded to
265 perl5-porters (with manual moderation, so please be patient). You
266 should only send patches to
267 L<perl5-porters@perl.org|mailto:perl5-porters@perl.org> directly if the
268 patch is not ready to be applied, but intended for discussion.
269
270 See the next section for how to configure and use git to send these
271 emails for you.
272
273 If you want to delete your temporary branch, you may do so with:
274
275   % git checkout blead
276   % git branch -d orange
277   error: The branch 'orange' is not an ancestor of your current HEAD.
278   If you are sure you want to delete it, run 'git branch -D orange'.
279   % git branch -D orange
280   Deleted branch orange.
281
282 =head2 Committing your changes
283
284 Assuming that you'd like to commit all the changes you've made as a
285 single atomic unit, run this command:
286
287    % git commit -a
288
289 (That C<-a> tells git to add every file you've changed to this commit.
290 New files aren't automatically added to your commit when you use
291 C<commit -a> If you want to add files or to commit some, but not all of
292 your changes, have a look at the documentation for C<git add>.)
293
294 Git will start up your favorite text editor, so that you can craft a
295 commit message for your change. See L<perlhack/Commit message> for more
296 information about what makes a good commit message.
297
298 Once you've finished writing your commit message and exited your
299 editor, git will write your change to disk and tell you something like
300 this:
301
302   Created commit daf8e63: explain git status and stuff about remotes
303    1 files changed, 83 insertions(+), 3 deletions(-)
304
305 If you re-run C<git status>, you should see something like this:
306
307   % git status
308   # On branch blead
309   # Your branch is ahead of 'origin/blead' by 2 commits.
310   #
311   # Untracked files:
312   #   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
313   #
314   #       deliberate.untracked
315   nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)
316
317 When in doubt, before you do anything else, check your status and read
318 it carefully, many questions are answered directly by the git status
319 output.
320
321 =head2 Using git to send patch emails
322
323 Please read L<perlhack> first in order to figure out where your patches
324 should be sent.
325
326 In your ~/git/perl repository, set the destination email to perl's bug
327 tracker:
328
329   $ git config sendemail.to perlbug@perl.org
330
331 Or maybe perl5-porters:
332
333   $ git config sendemail.to perl5-porters@perl.org
334
335 Then you can use git directly to send your patch emails:
336
337   $ git send-email 0001-Rename-Leon-Brocard-to-Orange-Brocard.patch
338
339 You may need to set some configuration variables for your particular
340 email service provider. For example, to set your global git config to
341 send email via a gmail account:
342
343   $ git config --global sendemail.smtpserver smtp.gmail.com
344   $ git config --global sendemail.smtpssl 1
345   $ git config --global sendemail.smtpuser YOURUSERNAME@gmail.com
346
347 With this configuration, you will be prompted for your gmail password
348 when you run 'git send-email'. You can also configure
349 C<sendemail.smtppass> with your password if you don't care about having
350 your password in the .gitconfig file.
351
352 =head2 A note on derived files
353
354 Be aware that many files in the distribution are derivative--avoid
355 patching them, because git won't see the changes to them, and the build
356 process will overwrite them. Patch the originals instead. Most
357 utilities (like perldoc) are in this category, i.e. patch
358 F<utils/perldoc.PL> rather than F<utils/perldoc>. Similarly, don't
359 create patches for files under $src_root/ext from their copies found in
360 $install_root/lib. If you are unsure about the proper location of a
361 file that may have gotten copied while building the source
362 distribution, consult the C<MANIFEST>.
363
364 =head2 Cleaning a working directory
365
366 The command C<git clean> can with varying arguments be used as a
367 replacement for C<make clean>.
368
369 To reset your working directory to a pristine condition you can do:
370
371   % git clean -dxf
372
373 However, be aware this will delete ALL untracked content. You can use
374
375   % git clean -Xf
376
377 to remove all ignored untracked files, such as build and test
378 byproduct, but leave any  manually created files alone.
379
380 If you only want to cancel some uncommitted edits, you can use C<git
381 checkout> and give it a list of files to be reverted, or C<git checkout
382 -f> to revert them all.
383
384 If you want to cancel one or several commits, you can use C<git reset>.
385
386 =head2 Bisecting
387
388 C<git> provides a built-in way to determine, with a binary search in
389 the history, which commit should be blamed for introducing a given bug.
390
391 Suppose that we have a script F<~/testcase.pl> that exits with C<0>
392 when some behaviour is correct, and with C<1> when it's faulty. You
393 need an helper script that automates building C<perl> and running the
394 testcase:
395
396   % cat ~/run
397   #!/bin/sh
398   git clean -dxf
399
400   # If you get './makedepend: 1: Syntax error: Unterminated quoted
401   # string' when bisecting versions of perl older than 5.9.5 this hack
402   # will work around the bug in makedepend.SH which was fixed in
403   # version 96a8704c. Make sure to comment out 'git checkout makedepend.SH'
404   # below too.
405   git show blead:makedepend.SH > makedepend.SH
406
407   # If you can use ccache, add -Dcc=ccache\ gcc -Dld=gcc to the Configure line
408   # if Encode is not needed for the test, you can speed up the bisect by
409   # excluding it from the runs with -Dnoextensions=Encode
410   sh Configure -des -Dusedevel -Doptimize="-g"
411   test -f config.sh || exit 125
412   # Correct makefile for newer GNU gcc
413   perl -ni -we 'print unless /<(?:built-in|command)/' makefile x2p/makefile
414   # if you just need miniperl, replace test_prep with miniperl
415   make test_prep
416   [ -x ./perl ] || exit 125
417   ./perl -Ilib ~/testcase.pl
418   ret=$?
419   [ $ret -gt 127 ] && ret=127
420   # git checkout makedepend.SH
421   git clean -dxf
422   exit $ret
423
424 This script may return C<125> to indicate that the corresponding commit
425 should be skipped. Otherwise, it returns the status of
426 F<~/testcase.pl>.
427
428 You first enter in bisect mode with:
429
430   % git bisect start
431
432 For example, if the bug is present on C<HEAD> but wasn't in 5.10.0,
433 C<git> will learn about this when you enter:
434
435   % git bisect bad
436   % git bisect good perl-5.10.0
437   Bisecting: 853 revisions left to test after this
438
439 This results in checking out the median commit between C<HEAD> and
440 C<perl-5.10.0>. You can then run the bisecting process with:
441
442   % git bisect run ~/run
443
444 When the first bad commit is isolated, C<git bisect> will tell you so:
445
446   ca4cfd28534303b82a216cfe83a1c80cbc3b9dc5 is first bad commit
447   commit ca4cfd28534303b82a216cfe83a1c80cbc3b9dc5
448   Author: Dave Mitchell <davem@fdisolutions.com>
449   Date:   Sat Feb 9 14:56:23 2008 +0000
450
451       [perl #49472] Attributes + Unknown Error
452       ...
453
454   bisect run success
455
456 You can peek into the bisecting process with C<git bisect log> and
457 C<git bisect visualize>. C<git bisect reset> will get you out of bisect
458 mode.
459
460 Please note that the first C<good> state must be an ancestor of the
461 first C<bad> state. If you want to search for the commit that I<solved>
462 some bug, you have to negate your test case (i.e. exit with C<1> if OK
463 and C<0> if not) and still mark the lower bound as C<good> and the
464 upper as C<bad>. The "first bad commit" has then to be understood as
465 the "first commit where the bug is solved".
466
467 C<git help bisect> has much more information on how you can tweak your
468 binary searches.
469
470 =head1 Topic branches and rewriting history
471
472 Individual committers should create topic branches under
473 B<yourname>/B<some_descriptive_name>. Other committers should check
474 with a topic branch's creator before making any change to it.
475
476 The simplest way to create a remote topic branch that works on all
477 versions of git is to push the current head as a new branch on the
478 remote, then check it out locally:
479
480   $ branch="$yourname/$some_descriptive_name"
481   $ git push origin HEAD:$branch
482   $ git checkout -b $branch origin/$branch
483
484 Users of git 1.7 or newer can do it in a more obvious manner:
485
486   $ branch="$yourname/$some_descriptive_name"
487   $ git checkout -b $branch
488   $ git push origin -u $branch
489
490 If you are not the creator of B<yourname>/B<some_descriptive_name>, you
491 might sometimes find that the original author has edited the branch's
492 history. There are lots of good reasons for this. Sometimes, an author
493 might simply be rebasing the branch onto a newer source point.
494 Sometimes, an author might have found an error in an early commit which
495 they wanted to fix before merging the branch to blead.
496
497 Currently the master repository is configured to forbid
498 non-fast-forward merges. This means that the branches within can not be
499 rebased and pushed as a single step.
500
501 The only way you will ever be allowed to rebase or modify the history
502 of a pushed branch is to delete it and push it as a new branch under
503 the same name. Please think carefully about doing this. It may be
504 better to sequentially rename your branches so that it is easier for
505 others working with you to cherry-pick their local changes onto the new
506 version. (XXX: needs explanation).
507
508 If you want to rebase a personal topic branch, you will have to delete
509 your existing topic branch and push as a new version of it. You can do
510 this via the following formula (see the explanation about C<refspec>'s
511 in the git push documentation for details) after you have rebased your
512 branch:
513
514    # first rebase
515    $ git checkout $user/$topic
516    $ git fetch
517    $ git rebase origin/blead
518
519    # then "delete-and-push"
520    $ git push origin :$user/$topic
521    $ git push origin $user/$topic
522
523 B<NOTE:> it is forbidden at the repository level to delete any of the
524 "primary" branches. That is any branch matching
525 C<m!^(blead|maint|perl)!>. Any attempt to do so will result in git
526 producing an error like this:
527
528     $ git push origin :blead
529     *** It is forbidden to delete blead/maint branches in this repository
530     error: hooks/update exited with error code 1
531     error: hook declined to update refs/heads/blead
532     To ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl
533      ! [remote rejected] blead (hook declined)
534      error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl'
535
536 As a matter of policy we do B<not> edit the history of the blead and
537 maint-* branches. If a typo (or worse) sneaks into a commit to blead or
538 maint-*, we'll fix it in another commit. The only types of updates
539 allowed on these branches are "fast-forward's", where all history is
540 preserved.
541
542 Annotated tags in the canonical perl.git repository will never be
543 deleted or modified. Think long and hard about whether you want to push
544 a local tag to perl.git before doing so. (Pushing unannotated tags is
545 not allowed.)
546
547 =head2 Grafts
548
549 The perl history contains one mistake which was not caught in the
550 conversion: a merge was recorded in the history between blead and
551 maint-5.10 where no merge actually occurred. Due to the nature of git,
552 this is now impossible to fix in the public repository. You can remove
553 this mis-merge locally by adding the following line to your
554 C<.git/info/grafts> file:
555
556   296f12bbbbaa06de9be9d09d3dcf8f4528898a49 434946e0cb7a32589ed92d18008aaa1d88515930
557
558 It is particularly important to have this graft line if any bisecting
559 is done in the area of the "merge" in question.
560
561 =head1 WRITE ACCESS TO THE GIT REPOSITORY
562
563 Once you have write access, you will need to modify the URL for the
564 origin remote to enable pushing. Edit F<.git/config> with the
565 git-config(1) command:
566
567   % git config remote.origin.url ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git
568
569 You can also set up your user name and e-mail address. Most people do
570 this once globally in their F<~/.gitconfig> by doing something like:
571
572   % git config --global user.name "Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason"
573   % git config --global user.email avarab@gmail.com
574
575 However if you'd like to override that just for perl then execute then
576 execute something like the following in F<perl>:
577
578   % git config user.email avar@cpan.org
579
580 It is also possible to keep C<origin> as a git remote, and add a new
581 remote for ssh access:
582
583   % git remote add camel perl5.git.perl.org:/perl.git
584
585 This allows you to update your local repository by pulling from
586 C<origin>, which is faster and doesn't require you to authenticate, and
587 to push your changes back with the C<camel> remote:
588
589   % git fetch camel
590   % git push camel
591
592 The C<fetch> command just updates the C<camel> refs, as the objects
593 themselves should have been fetched when pulling from C<origin>.
594
595 =head1 Accepting a patch
596
597 If you have received a patch file generated using the above section,
598 you should try out the patch.
599
600 First we need to create a temporary new branch for these changes and
601 switch into it:
602
603   % git checkout -b experimental
604
605 Patches that were formatted by C<git format-patch> are applied with
606 C<git am>:
607
608   % git am 0001-Rename-Leon-Brocard-to-Orange-Brocard.patch
609   Applying Rename Leon Brocard to Orange Brocard
610
611 If just a raw diff is provided, it is also possible use this two-step
612 process:
613
614   % git apply bugfix.diff
615   % git commit -a -m "Some fixing" --author="That Guy <that.guy@internets.com>"
616
617 Now we can inspect the change:
618
619   % git show HEAD
620   commit b1b3dab48344cff6de4087efca3dbd63548ab5e2
621   Author: Leon Brocard <acme@astray.com>
622   Date:   Fri Dec 19 17:02:59 2008 +0000
623
624     Rename Leon Brocard to Orange Brocard
625
626   diff --git a/AUTHORS b/AUTHORS
627   index 293dd70..722c93e 100644
628   --- a/AUTHORS
629   +++ b/AUTHORS
630   @@ -541,7 +541,7 @@ Lars Hecking                        <lhecking@nmrc.ucc.ie>
631    Laszlo Molnar                  <laszlo.molnar@eth.ericsson.se>
632    Leif Huhn                      <leif@hale.dkstat.com>
633    Len Johnson                    <lenjay@ibm.net>
634   -Leon Brocard                   <acme@astray.com>
635   +Orange Brocard                 <acme@astray.com>
636    Les Peters                     <lpeters@aol.net>
637    Lesley Binks                   <lesley.binks@gmail.com>
638    Lincoln D. Stein               <lstein@cshl.org>
639
640 If you are a committer to Perl and you think the patch is good, you can
641 then merge it into blead then push it out to the main repository:
642
643   % git checkout blead
644   % git merge experimental
645   % git push
646
647 If you want to delete your temporary branch, you may do so with:
648
649   % git checkout blead
650   % git branch -d experimental
651   error: The branch 'experimental' is not an ancestor of your current HEAD.
652   If you are sure you want to delete it, run 'git branch -D experimental'.
653   % git branch -D experimental
654   Deleted branch experimental.
655
656 =head2 Committing to blead
657
658 The 'blead' branch will become the next production release of Perl.
659
660 Before pushing I<any> local change to blead, it's incredibly important
661 that you do a few things, lest other committers come after you with
662 pitchforks and torches:
663
664 =over
665
666 =item *
667
668 Make sure you have a good commit message. See L<perlhack/Commit
669 message> for details.
670
671 =item *
672
673 Run the test suite. You might not think that one typo fix would break a
674 test file. You'd be wrong. Here's an example of where not running the
675 suite caused problems. A patch was submitted that added a couple of
676 tests to an existing .t. It couldn't possibly affect anything else, so
677 no need to test beyond the single affected .t, right?  But, the
678 submitter's email address had changed since the last of their
679 submissions, and this caused other tests to fail. Running the test
680 target given in the next item would have caught this problem.
681
682 =item *
683
684 If you don't run the full test suite, at least C<make test_porting>.
685 This will run basic sanity checks. To see which sanity checks, have a
686 look in F<t/porting>.
687
688 =item *
689
690 If you make any changes that affect miniperl or core routines that have
691 different code paths for miniperl, be sure to run C<make minitest>.
692 This will catch problems that even the full test suite will not catch
693 because it runs a subset of tests under miniperl rather than perl.
694
695 =back
696
697 =head3 On merging and rebasing
698
699 Simple, one-off commits pushed to the 'blead' branch should be simple
700 commits that apply cleanly.  In other words, you should make sure your
701 work is committed against the current position of blead, so that you can
702 push back to the master repository without merging.
703
704 Sometimes, blead will move while you're building or testing your
705 changes.  When this happens, your push will be rejected with a message
706 like this:
707
708   To ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git
709    ! [rejected]        blead -> blead (non-fast-forward)
710   error: failed to push some refs to 'ssh://perl5.git.perl.org/perl.git'
711   To prevent you from losing history, non-fast-forward updates were rejected
712   Merge the remote changes (e.g. 'git pull') before pushing again.  See the
713   'Note about fast-forwards' section of 'git push --help' for details.
714
715 When this happens, you can just I<rebase> your work against the new
716 position of blead, like this (assuming your remote for the master
717 repository is "p5p"):
718
719   $ git fetch p5p
720   $ git rebase p5p/blead
721
722 You will see your commits being re-applied, and you will then be able to
723 push safely.  More information about rebasing can be found in the
724 documentation for the git-rebase(1) command.
725
726 For larger sets of commits that only make sense together, or that would
727 benefit from a summary of the set's purpose, you should use a merge
728 commit.  You should perform your work on a L<topic branch|/Topic
729 branches and rewriting history>, which you should regularly rebase
730 against blead to ensure that your code is not broken by blead moving.
731 When you have finished your work, please perform a final rebase and
732 test.  Linear history is something that gets lost with every
733 commit on blead, but a final rebase makes the history linear
734 again, making it easier for future maintainers to see what has
735 happened.  Rebase as follows (assuming your work was on the
736 branch C<< committer/somework >>):
737
738   $ git checkout committer/somework
739   $ git rebase blead
740
741 Then you can merge it into master like this:
742
743   $ git checkout blead
744   $ git merge --no-ff --no-commit committer/somework
745   $ git commit -a
746
747 The switches above deserve explanation.  C<--no-ff> indicates that even
748 if all your work can be applied linearly against blead, a merge commit
749 should still be prepared.  This ensures that all your work will be shown
750 as a side branch, with all its commits merged into the mainstream blead
751 by the merge commit.
752
753 C<--no-commit> means that the merge commit will be I<prepared> but not
754 I<committed>.  The commit is then actually performed when you run the
755 next command, which will bring up your editor to describe the commit.
756 Without C<--no-commit>, the commit would be made with nearly no useful
757 message, which would greatly diminish the value of the merge commit as a
758 placeholder for the work's description.
759
760 When describing the merge commit, explain the purpose of the branch, and
761 keep in mind that this description will probably be used by the
762 eventual release engineer when reviewing the next perldelta document.
763
764 =head2 Committing to maintenance versions
765
766 Maintenance versions should only be altered to add critical bug fixes,
767 see L<perlpolicy>.
768
769 To commit to a maintenance version of perl, you need to create a local
770 tracking branch:
771
772   % git checkout --track -b maint-5.005 origin/maint-5.005
773
774 This creates a local branch named C<maint-5.005>, which tracks the
775 remote branch C<origin/maint-5.005>. Then you can pull, commit, merge
776 and push as before.
777
778 You can also cherry-pick commits from blead and another branch, by
779 using the C<git cherry-pick> command. It is recommended to use the
780 B<-x> option to C<git cherry-pick> in order to record the SHA1 of the
781 original commit in the new commit message.
782
783 Before pushing any change to a maint version, make sure you've
784 satisfied the steps in L</Committing to blead> above.
785
786 =head2 Merging from a branch via GitHub
787
788 While we don't encourage the submission of patches via GitHub, that
789 will still happen. Here is a guide to merging patches from a GitHub
790 repository.
791
792   % git remote add avar git://github.com/avar/perl.git
793   % git fetch avar
794
795 Now you can see the differences between the branch and blead:
796
797   % git diff avar/orange
798
799 And you can see the commits:
800
801   % git log avar/orange
802
803 If you approve of a specific commit, you can cherry pick it:
804
805   % git cherry-pick 0c24b290ae02b2ab3304f51d5e11e85eb3659eae
806
807 Or you could just merge the whole branch if you like it all:
808
809   % git merge avar/orange
810
811 And then push back to the repository:
812
813   % git push
814
815 =head2 A note on camel and dromedary
816
817 The committers have SSH access to the two servers that serve
818 C<perl5.git.perl.org>. One is C<perl5.git.perl.org> itself (I<camel>),
819 which is the 'master' repository. The second one is
820 C<users.perl5.git.perl.org> (I<dromedary>), which can be used for
821 general testing and development. Dromedary syncs the git tree from
822 camel every few minutes, you should not push there. Both machines also
823 have a full CPAN mirror in /srv/CPAN, please use this. To share files
824 with the general public, dromedary serves your ~/public_html/ as
825 C<http://users.perl5.git.perl.org/~yourlogin/>
826
827 These hosts have fairly strict firewalls to the outside. Outgoing, only
828 rsync, ssh and git are allowed. For http and ftp, you can use
829 http://webproxy:3128 as proxy. Incoming, the firewall tries to detect
830 attacks and blocks IP addresses with suspicious activity. This
831 sometimes (but very rarely) has false positives and you might get
832 blocked. The quickest way to get unblocked is to notify the admins.
833
834 These two boxes are owned, hosted, and operated by booking.com. You can
835 reach the sysadmins in #p5p on irc.perl.org or via mail to
836 C<perl5-porters@perl.org>.