This is a live mirror of the Perl 5 development currently hosted at https://github.com/perl/perl5
[perl #22236] File::Basename behavior is misleading
[perl5.git] / lib / File / Basename.pm
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 File::Basename - Parse file paths into directory, filename and suffix.
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7     use File::Basename;
8
9     ($name,$path,$suffix) = fileparse($fullname,@suffixlist);
10     $name = fileparse($fullname,@suffixlist);
11
12     $basename = basename($fullname,@suffixlist);
13     $dirname  = dirname($fullname);
14
15
16 =head1 DESCRIPTION
17
18 These routines allow you to parse file paths into their directory, filename
19 and suffix.
20
21 B<NOTE>: C<dirname()> and C<basename()> emulate the behaviours, and quirks, of
22 the shell and C functions of the same name.  See each function's documention
23 for details.
24
25 It is guaranteed that
26
27     # Where $path_separator is / for Unix, \ for Windows, etc...
28     dirname($path) . $path_separator . basename($path);
29
30 is equivalent to the original path for all systems but VMS.
31
32 =cut
33
34
35 package File::Basename;
36
37 # A bit of juggling to insure that C<use re 'taint';> always works, since
38 # File::Basename is used during the Perl build, when the re extension may
39 # not be available.
40 BEGIN {
41   unless (eval { require re; })
42     { eval ' sub re::import { $^H |= 0x00100000; } ' } # HINT_RE_TAINT
43   import re 'taint';
44 }
45
46
47 use strict;
48 use 5.006;
49 use warnings;
50 our(@ISA, @EXPORT, $VERSION, $Fileparse_fstype, $Fileparse_igncase);
51 require Exporter;
52 @ISA = qw(Exporter);
53 @EXPORT = qw(fileparse fileparse_set_fstype basename dirname);
54 $VERSION = "2.73";
55
56 fileparse_set_fstype($^O);
57
58
59 =over 4
60
61 =item C<fileparse>
62
63     my($filename, $directories, $suffix) = fileparse($path);
64     my($filename, $directories, $suffix) = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
65     my $filename                         = fileparse($path, @suffixes);
66
67 The C<fileparse()> routine divides a file path into its $directories, $filename
68 and (optionally) the filename $suffix.
69
70 $directories contains everything up to and including the last
71 directory separator in the $path including the volume (if applicable).
72 The remainder of the $path is the $filename.
73
74      # On Unix returns ("baz", "/foo/bar/", "")
75      fileparse("/foo/bar/baz");
76
77      # On Windows returns ("baz", "C:\foo\bar\", "")
78      fileparse("C:\foo\bar\baz");
79
80      # On Unix returns ("", "/foo/bar/baz/", "")
81      fileparse("/foo/bar/baz/");
82
83 If @suffixes are given each element is a pattern (either a string or a
84 C<qr//>) matched against the end of the $filename.  The matching
85 portion is removed and becomes the $suffix.
86
87      # On Unix returns ("baz", "/foo/bar", ".txt")
88      fileparse("/foo/bar/baz", qr/\.[^.]*/);
89
90 If type is non-Unix (see C<fileparse_set_fstype()>) then the pattern
91 matching for suffix removal is performed case-insensitively, since
92 those systems are not case-sensitive when opening existing files.
93
94 You are guaranteed that C<$directories . $filename . $suffix> will
95 denote the same location as the original $path.
96
97 =cut
98
99
100 sub fileparse {
101   my($fullname,@suffices) = @_;
102
103   unless (defined $fullname) {
104       require Carp;
105       Carp::croak("fileparse(): need a valid pathname");
106   }
107
108   my $orig_type = '';
109   my($type,$igncase) = ($Fileparse_fstype, $Fileparse_igncase);
110
111   my($taint) = substr($fullname,0,0);  # Is $fullname tainted?
112
113   if ($type eq "VMS" and $fullname =~ m{/} ) {
114     # We're doing Unix emulation
115     $orig_type = $type;
116     $type = 'Unix';
117   }
118
119   my($dirpath, $basename);
120
121   if (grep { $type eq $_ } qw(MSDOS DOS MSWin32 Epoc)) {
122     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^((?:.*[:\\\/])?)(.*)/s);
123     $dirpath .= '.\\' unless $dirpath =~ /[\\\/]\z/;
124   }
125   elsif ($type eq "OS2") {
126     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ m#^((?:.*[:\\/])?)(.*)#s);
127     $dirpath = './' unless $dirpath;    # Can't be 0
128     $dirpath .= '/' unless $dirpath =~ m#[\\/]\z#;
129   }
130   elsif ($type eq "MacOS") {
131     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^(.*:)?(.*)/s);
132     $dirpath = ':' unless $dirpath;
133   }
134   elsif ($type eq "AmigaOS") {
135     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /(.*[:\/])?(.*)/s);
136     $dirpath = './' unless $dirpath;
137   }
138   elsif ($type eq 'VMS' ) {
139     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ /^(.*[:>\]])?(.*)/s);
140     $dirpath ||= '';  # should always be defined
141   }
142   else { # Default to Unix semantics.
143     ($dirpath,$basename) = ($fullname =~ m#^(.*/)?(.*)#s);
144     if ($orig_type eq 'VMS' and $fullname =~ m:^(/[^/]+/000000(/|$))(.*):) {
145       # dev:[000000] is top of VMS tree, similar to Unix '/'
146       # so strip it off and treat the rest as "normal"
147       my $devspec  = $1;
148       my $remainder = $3;
149       ($dirpath,$basename) = ($remainder =~ m#^(.*/)?(.*)#s);
150       $dirpath ||= '';  # should always be defined
151       $dirpath = $devspec.$dirpath;
152     }
153     $dirpath = './' unless $dirpath;
154   }
155       
156
157   my($tail, $suffix);
158   if (@suffices) {
159     $tail = '';
160     foreach $suffix (@suffices) {
161       my $pat = ($igncase ? '(?i)' : '') . "($suffix)\$";
162       if ($basename =~ s/$pat//s) {
163         $taint .= substr($suffix,0,0);
164         $tail = $1 . $tail;
165       }
166     }
167   }
168
169   # Ensure taint is propgated from the path to its pieces.
170   $tail .= $taint if defined $tail; # avoid warning if $tail == undef
171   wantarray ? ($basename .= $taint, $dirpath .= $taint, $tail)
172             : ($basename .= $taint);
173 }
174
175
176
177 =item C<basename>
178
179     my $filename = basename($path);
180     my $filename = basename($path, @suffixes);
181
182 This function is provided for compatibility with the Unix shell command 
183 C<basename(1)>.  It does B<NOT> always return the file name portion of a
184 path as you might expect.  To be safe, if you want the file name portion of
185 a path use C<fileparse()>.
186
187 C<basename()> returns the last level of a filepath even if the last
188 level is clearly directory.  In effect, it is acting like C<pop()> for
189 paths.  This differs from C<fileparse()>'s behaviour.
190
191     # Both return "bar"
192     basename("/foo/bar");
193     basename("/foo/bar/");
194
195 @suffixes work as in C<fileparse()> except all regex metacharacters are
196 quoted.
197
198     # These two function calls are equivalent.
199     my $filename = basename("/foo/bar/baz.txt",  ".txt");
200     my $filename = fileparse("/foo/bar/baz.txt", qr/\Q.txt\E/);
201
202 =cut
203
204
205 sub basename {
206   my($name) = shift;
207   _strip_trailing_sep($name);
208   (fileparse($name, map("\Q$_\E",@_)))[0];
209 }
210
211
212
213 =item C<dirname>
214
215 This function is provided for compatibility with the Unix shell
216 command C<dirname(1)> and has inherited some of its quirks.  In spite of
217 its name it does B<NOT> always return the directory name as you might
218 expect.  To be safe, if you want the directory name of a path use
219 C<fileparse()>.
220
221 Only on VMS (where there is no ambiguity between the file and directory
222 portions of a path) and AmigaOS (possibly due to an implementation quirk in
223 this module) does C<dirname()> work like C<fileparse($path)>, returning just the
224 $directories.
225
226     # On VMS and AmigaOS
227     my $directories = dirname($path);
228
229 When using Unix or MSDOS syntax this emulates the C<dirname(1)> shell function
230 which is subtly different from how C<fileparse()> works.  It returns all but
231 the last level of a file path even if the last level is clearly a directory.
232 In effect, it is not returning the directory portion but simply the path one
233 level up acting like C<chop()> for file paths.
234
235 Also unlike C<fileparse()>, C<dirname()> does not include a trailing slash on
236 its returned path.
237
238     # returns /foo/bar.  fileparse() would return /foo/bar/
239     dirname("/foo/bar/baz");
240
241     # also returns /foo/bar despite the fact that baz is clearly a 
242     # directory.  fileparse() would return /foo/bar/baz/
243     dirname("/foo/bar/baz/");
244
245     # returns '.'.  fileparse() would return 'foo/'
246     dirname("foo/");
247
248 Under VMS, if there is no directory information in the $path, then the
249 current default device and directory is used.
250
251 =cut
252
253
254 sub dirname {
255     my $path = shift;
256
257     my($type) = $Fileparse_fstype;
258
259     if( $type eq 'VMS' and $path =~ m{/} ) {
260         # Parse as Unix
261         local($File::Basename::Fileparse_fstype) = '';
262         return dirname($path);
263     }
264
265     my($basename, $dirname) = fileparse($path);
266
267     if ($type eq 'VMS') { 
268         $dirname ||= $ENV{DEFAULT};
269     }
270     elsif ($type eq 'MacOS') {
271         if( !length($basename) && $dirname !~ /^[^:]+:\z/) {
272             _strip_trailing_sep($dirname);
273             ($basename,$dirname) = fileparse $dirname;
274         }
275         $dirname .= ":" unless $dirname =~ /:\z/;
276     }
277     elsif (grep { $type eq $_ } qw(MSDOS DOS MSWin32 OS2)) { 
278         _strip_trailing_sep($dirname);
279         unless( length($basename) ) {
280             ($basename,$dirname) = fileparse $dirname;
281             _strip_trailing_sep($dirname);
282         }
283     }
284     elsif ($type eq 'AmigaOS') {
285         if ( $dirname =~ /:\z/) { return $dirname }
286         chop $dirname;
287         $dirname =~ s#[^:/]+\z## unless length($basename);
288     }
289     else {
290         _strip_trailing_sep($dirname);
291         unless( length($basename) ) {
292             ($basename,$dirname) = fileparse $dirname;
293             _strip_trailing_sep($dirname);
294         }
295     }
296
297     $dirname;
298 }
299
300
301 # Strip the trailing path separator.
302 sub _strip_trailing_sep  {
303     my $type = $Fileparse_fstype;
304
305     if ($type eq 'MacOS') {
306         $_[0] =~ s/([^:]):\z/$1/s;
307     }
308     elsif (grep { $type eq $_ } qw(MSDOS DOS MSWin32 OS2)) { 
309         $_[0] =~ s/([^:])[\\\/]*\z/$1/;
310     }
311     else {
312         $_[0] =~ s{(.)/*\z}{$1}s;
313     }
314 }
315
316
317 =item C<fileparse_set_fstype>
318
319   my $type = fileparse_set_fstype();
320   my $previous_type = fileparse_set_fstype($type);
321
322 Normally File::Basename will assume a file path type native to your current
323 operating system (ie. /foo/bar style on Unix, \foo\bar on Windows, etc...).
324 With this function you can override that assumption.
325
326 Valid $types are "MacOS", "VMS", "AmigaOS", "OS2", "RISCOS",
327 "MSWin32", "DOS" (also "MSDOS" for backwards bug compatibility),
328 "Epoc" and "Unix" (all case-insensitive).  If an unrecognized $type is
329 given "Unix" will be assumed.
330
331 If you've selected VMS syntax, and the file specification you pass to
332 one of these routines contains a "/", they assume you are using Unix
333 emulation and apply the Unix syntax rules instead, for that function
334 call only.
335
336 =back
337
338 =cut
339
340
341 BEGIN {
342
343 my @Ignore_Case = qw(MacOS VMS AmigaOS OS2 RISCOS MSWin32 MSDOS DOS Epoc);
344 my @Types = (@Ignore_Case, qw(Unix));
345
346 sub fileparse_set_fstype {
347     my $old = $Fileparse_fstype;
348
349     if (@_) {
350         my $new_type = shift;
351
352         $Fileparse_fstype = 'Unix';  # default
353         foreach my $type (@Types) {
354             $Fileparse_fstype = $type if $new_type =~ /^$type/i;
355         }
356
357         $Fileparse_igncase = 
358           (grep $Fileparse_fstype eq $_, @Ignore_Case) ? 1 : 0;
359     }
360
361     return $old;
362 }
363
364 }
365
366
367 1;